PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

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THE FIELD SERVICE PARC AT BILLANCOURT

The parc at Billancourt is closed and another landmark of the old Field Service has passed into tradition. It rightly claims to have been the oldest landmark, for long before "21" had been thought of, the cars for Section 8 were delivered, and soon after, Section 9, one early morning, rolled out from its gates to Alsace via Versailles. From then on, its business was to meet the demands of rue Raynouard and car after car was delivered to be sent to the front or formed into new sections. At the same time spare parts were received, sorted and sent out to meet the incessant orders from the front.

For those --- and there are many of us --- who came into close contact with the parc, there are remembrances which go deeper than the 980 cars repaired and set up or than the many thousands of dollars worth of spare parts issued. What original member of Section 8 will ever forget those days at the newly established parc where he worked as a carpenter, mechanic and painter! ----A good training for the work that was ahead. How many of those who volunteered later to help in the equipping will forget that the French army insists that tires must be numbered and recorded accurately! Some of them were section leaders later, and perhaps the training helped them. What section leader and mechanic has not felt the parc was an intimate part of his daily work, looking on it either as a friend or as an enemy, depending on the way his cars were running that day. The parc stood for him as something to be telegraphed to or telegraphed at, always something which he knew the success of his section depended upon.

To a few of us ---those to whom all of its details were in the day's work --- there are many incidents which made that part of the work alive with remembrances. There was the first summer when things were easy, when chassis were driven from the ports on wonderful summer days, and spare parts for the few sections were easy to obtain. Then quickly the change when transportation was tied up, and parts which foresight had ordered from America, were lost among the millions of cases in Bordeaux and picked out months later among those cases and brought. up. Then came the period when chassis for which no gasoline could be spared had to be brought by rail in space which could not be gotten, but which was gotten. Then came the triumph of being able to supply Section 3 on forty eight hour notice with the huge new equipment which its adventure to the Orient required. Then again the routine of the winter, broken by the unexpected early frost which froze the radiators of all the reserve cars showing that the parc was human after all. Then finally the days of the next spring, days of terrific pressure when section after section must leave and at the same time parts and cars must be sent to the old ones. Pressure which reached its height during the month of May when five new sections of cars were delivered at rue Raynouard!

The parc's two years was a full page in the history of the service, a fuller page than most members of the service could realize because its work like its founding, and like its close last week, was done without fuss but with always the day's work accomplished. Perhaps in reading this the men of the old service will look back again on their days at the front and recall that good days and bad days were judged by how their cars were running and perhaps they will find that the good days were more frequent than the bad days and that the latter were often due to their own negligence. If they do they will realize what part of their success they owed to the parc and what was accomplished by Robert Moss and those who helped him in those two years of work which had no excitement or adventure but which had their reward in work well done.

S. G.

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       OLD F. S. COAT

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
Thou art not so unkind
As man's ingratitude...
                                        SHAKESPEARE.

Au revoir, old F. S. uniform
   That encased my shape of yore
They've put the kibosh on you,
   And you'll be seen no more.

Yet I somehow hate to part with you
   For this handsome U. S. coat
Which is cut so short up in the rear
   And bulges at my throat.

I paid a goodly sum for you
   After many efforts blind
To get the full equipment that
   They promised when I signed.

So you've done your duty ever since
   I signed away my name
As a member of the army seeking
   Thirty dollar Fame.

All winter you did stoutly keep
   The bitter cold away
While the government sent me numbers
   And delayed to send the pay.

Yet somehow I can't figure why
   You make the Service sore
You're really quite as handsome as
   The one the Captain wore.

Au revoir --- and yet in parting
   I'll remember one thing, coat
While I wore you you sure gathered
   More than one lieutenant's goat

R. A. D.
S. S. U. 18

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       O TEMPORA ! O MORES!

The shades of night were falling fast
   As thru our Argonne village passed
One bitter cold December night
   An Ambulance without a light. Excelerator.

Around the corner madly dashed
   A camion --- Bang ! The two had crashed.
In French and English both did curse,
   Mille Dios! and a whole lot worse.

The camion, dented, wheel and hood
   The shock of contact well withstood
The Ford, distorted, twisted, bent,
   Barely reached the cantonnement.

"This must be stopped", declared the boss,
    "The rules I strictly must enfo'ce."
The driver, broken, to the brig was led,
   And the faithful Ford, with a sigh dropped dead.

The Big Blat, Feb. 1918.

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                       MIRAGE

My pain of wandering and these lonely days
Will have an ending in some quiet form
     Whose certitude I feel.
Of home and springtide and of tender ways,
Of fireside havens when December flays
My homeland fields with sleety stinging storm
     Over an icy seal.

How oft beyond the roaring and the fire
I see beyond a beckoning of bliss
     In quiet tender eyes.
Beyond the stenches of this carnal pyre,
I scent the honey of a blossomed briar.
I feel the courage of a promised kiss
     Out of my heart arise,

The loss of comrades and the weary nights
And all this seeming endlessness of time
     Were hard to bear
Except I see my labor in the light
Of other comrades suffering this plight
Who wait as I those moments of a clime
     Where love and peace shall fare.

Ray G. Gauger.
S. S. U. 622

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SECTION 17 CITATION

Old Section 17 (now S. S. U. 635) received the following Corps d'Armee citation on April 24th, 1918.

« La Section Sanitaire Automobile Américaine 635, sous les ordres du lieutenant De Joly et du lieutenant Neftel:

« Pendant tout le cours des opérations, et plus particulièrement pendant les journées des quatre et cinq avril 1918 a, de nuit et de jour, assuré sous le feu, avec un dévouement infatigable et un mépris absolu du danger, le transport et l'évacuation des blessés des premières lignes. »

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FINE WORK OF U.S. "ACE ".
New Record for Sgt. Frank L. Baylies (S.S.U. 1 & 3.)

Huit Victoires en trois mois.

« Guynemer disait autrefois qu'un chasseur aérien ne se forme pas. D'après lui on naît avec les qualités d'un as et l'aviateur qui n'abat pas un Boche après un mois d'escadrille de chasse devait céder la place à un autre.

« Cette théorie tout d'une tranche s'applique du bon côté pour l'as américain, le sergent Baylies, dont les exploits remarquables valent une mention spéciale.

« Il vient de détruire son 8e avion ennemi.

« Sa première victoire remonte au 10 février.»

Le Matin, 14 Mai 1918.

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Nine for Sgt. Baylies.

Sergeant Baylies the United States pilot, has scored another victory, says the Matin, thus bringing his total up to nine, of which four have been scored this month.

Daily Mail, May 15 1918.

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NOTES

Lieut. W. J. Losh (S. S.U. 10) has received the Croix de Guerre.

-------------------

Will Hood (T.M.U. 184) has received a commission as 2nd. Lieut in Q. M. C.

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VISITORS AT 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

Arthur C. Kimber (S.S.U. 14) 1st lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; Andrew K. Henry (T.M.U. 397) American Records Office ; Vernon McClellan (S.S.U. 68) Ord. Dept. N. A. ; William A. Lowrie (S.S.U. 67) U. S. A. A. S. ; W. R. Hees, Jr. (S.S.U. 67) U. S. A. A. S.; Dalton V. Garsten (S.S.U. 67) U. S. A. A. S.; E. C. Lawrence (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S. : Carl W. Vail (S.S. U. 19) U. S. A. A. S. ; Robert A. Cunningham (S.S.U. 66) A. R. C. Rome, Italy; Philip T. Sprague (S.S.U. 8) Gas Service Laboratory; Lansing Warren (S.S.U. 70 and 18) U. S. A. A. S.; Burnet Wohlford (S.S.U. 10 and 18) U. S. A. A. S. ; Jos. T. Walker, Jr. (T.M.U. 133 and 526) 5 bis, Brigade Ecole Militaire, Fontainebleau ; Larry Walsh (S.S.U. 68) A. P. O. 735 A. E. F. ; Louis G. Caldwell (S. S. U. 65) 90e Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; Edmund R. Purves (S.S.U. 4) U. S. A. A. S. C. A. Whitbeck (S.S.U. 9) U. S. A. A. S. ; Charles W. Love (S.S.U. 30) U. S. A. A. S. ; Edward L. Pelham (T.M.U. 184) Y. M. C. A. ; J. G. Crafts (T.M.U. 133) Aviation ; Walter Emory Powers (S.S.U. 16) U. S. A. A. S. Richard B. Varnum (S.S.U. 3) U. S. Aviation ; Charles A. Amsdem (S.S.U. 3) U. S. Aviation ; H. W. Patterson (T.M.U. 133) 90e brigade Ecole Militaire Fontainebleau ; T. F. McAllister (S.S.U. 69) 5e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; Parker K. Ellis (S.S.U. 9) 90e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; James M. White (S.S.U. 1) Gas Service; William Ford Moreland (T.M.U. 526) 97e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; John F. Howe (T.M.U. 133), 5e Brigade Ecole Militaire, Fontainebleau ; J. M. Parmelee (S.S.U. 27) 90e Brigade Ecole Militaire, Fontainebleau ; Edward J. M. Diemer (S.S.U. 2) U. S A. A. S. ; Andrew Jack (S.S.U. 70) U. S. A. A. S. ; Alton C. Ingraham (S.S.U. 70 and 16) U. S. A. A. S. ; Russell Davy Greene (S. S.U. 68) Air Service ; J. R. Van Cleve (S.S.U. 29) ; J. R. Steers Jr. (S.S.U. 29) ; Fenton G. Elwell (S.S.U. 66) 5e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; John W. Ames, Jr. (S.S.U. 2) 45e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; William M. Barber (S.S.U. 3) 5e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; Robert Buell (S.S.U. 15), Fontainebleau.

 

LOCAL NOTES

During the past week many of the old A. F. S. men who joined the Red Cross Ambulance service in Italy have dropped in at "21" their six months engagement there being terminated.

The Whitsuntide holiday caused an overflow at meal hours at rue Raynouard which brought back memories of olden days.

There was a large sprinkling of blue uniforms.

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PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

SPECIAL FOURTH OF JULY NUMBER

Contributions are invited from all of the "littérateurs" and artistic geniuses of the old Field Service for the Special Fourth of July Number which will be made up of poems, drawings and articles appropriate to the great American holiday.

For the Best Poem, embodying the spirit of the day, a prize of Frs. 25.

For the Best Reminiscence of any previous Fourth of July celebration in any Field Service section a prize of Frs 25.

For the Best Design for a cover for this special number, a prize of Frs. 25.

All contributions should be in the hands o[ the Editor on or before Julie 20th.

 

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

F. Darius Benham T.M.U. 397 45e Brigade, Ecole Militaire, Fontainebleau.
Roger Terry Bacon S.S.U. 9 Pvt. Fifth Field Artillery, A.E.F.
Blake Everett Clark S.S.U. 12 Pvt. 301st F. A. D. Battery Camp Devens.
Henry Howard Houston S.S.U. 12, T.M.U. 133 1st Lieut. 53rd F. A Brigade Camp Hancock.
Clarence William Lindeman T.M.U. 133 Pvt. Battery E, 15th F. A. A. E. F.
Charles Bernard Nordhoff Vosges Det. 2nd Lieut. Aviation Escadrille N. 99, S. P. 185.
Roger Nutt S.S.U. 17 Cadet Aviation, U. S. A.
Warren Lee Pierson T.M.U. 133 1st Lieut. Air Service, A. S. S. C. U. S. R.
Thomas B. Pope S.S.U. 26 Pvt. Artillery, Camp Grant.
James Key Saunders S.S.U. 8 1st Lieut. 29th Machine Gun Brigade.
Gustave B. Schurmeier T.M.U. 133 Student Officer Aviation, U.S.A.
George W. Scribner S.S.U. 26 Expediting Dept. Construction Div. U. S. Government.
John S. Spaulding T.M.U. 526 U. S. Air Service A. E. F.
Edward La Nauze Strater S.S.U. 1 Field Artillery 3rd G. T. S.
Alan McEwen Thompson S.S.U. 66 Applied for Naval Aviation U.S.A.
Norman William Van Ausdall T.M.U. 184 Cadet, Aviation U. S. A.
Howard True Wheeler T.M.U. 133 Flying Cadet, Aviation U.S.A.
Lester Clark Whitten S.S.U. 26 Pvt. 1st cl. Aviation Section S. E. R. C. U. S. A.
Harold B. Whipp S.S.U. 13 1st Lieut. R. O. T. C. U. S. A.
Charles Oscar Wilson S.S.U. 69 Buck private---rear rank R. O. T. C. U. S. A.
Harold Curtis Wiswall S.S.U. 30 2nd Lieut. Ordonnance Reserve, Motor Section, U. S. A.
Charles Fitch McQuistor T.M.U. 133 Artillery, U. S. A. Dobbs Ferry.
H. Weir Cook S.S.U. 16 1st Lieut. Aviation Section Signal R. C.
Archie Perry Wilks T.M.U. 526 Driver, American Red Cross.
Robert Ridenour Lester S.S..U. 10 Student Flight Officer U. S. and Naval Air Service, U.S.A.

-------------------

 

     THE BOYS WHO NEVER GREW UP
                To the Foreign Legion

If the bowl be of gold and the liquor of flame,
          What if poison lie in the cup?
If the maiden be fair--- our soul's in the game,
If her kisses be death---we'll kiss just the same
Sang the Legion of Boys Who Never Grew Up.

Blind with the blindness of Youth, but with all of it
          Clearer of vision than seers! The refrain
"France is beset " smote their ears, and the call of it
          Woke the boy dreamers from Nippon to Spain,
Boers from the Veldt and Hidalgoes from Aragon,
          Cowmen from Argentine, Yankees from Maine,
Race of the Caesars from Venice to Taragon
          Rallied to France, to play soldier again.

Under the Tri-color, long khaki files of them,
          Through the Etoile, down the Champs-Elysées
Marched, while grisettes blew their kisses to miles of them,
          And only the old brushed the tear stains away,
Out where the crows spread their ominous pinions
          Shadowing France from Nancy to Fay,
Singing, they marched 'gainst the Kaiser's grey minions
          Singing the song. of Boyhood at play.

If the bowl be of gold and the liquor of flame,
          What if poison lie in the cup?
If the maiden he fair ---our soul's in the game
If her kisses he death --- we'll kiss just the same,
Sang the legion of boys who will never grow up!

Charles LAW WATKINS. -
(Formerly of S. S. U. 8).

-------------------

 

           A SUMMER CONVOI

The last brancard is shoved into its place
     As salmon turns to yellow in the sky.
The rosy tints of early summer dawn
     Give way before the sun as it climbs high.

A hasty cup of jus, a piece of bread,
     A hand-clasp to the girl in yonder house
(For she's been mighty nice while we've been here,
     Sewing on buttons, mending my torn blouse,

Trying to teach me French, a hard job that!
     Gave me her picture, too, and said she'd write)
And now we're off, a whistle blows, we crank,
     Then down the road we wind, soon out of sight.

But just before we turned the corner there,
     Where shells come whistling in 'most every night.
I looked, and she was standing by the door
     A-waving to me. She's been nice, all right.

The country here is rolling, and the road
     Lies white and winding, almost like a snake.
No rain has fallen for two weeks or more,
     And Lordy what a dust those camions make!

And wasn't I a fool to choose the rear?
     My eyes, my nose, my ears, my clothes are filled
With fine white powder. Far ahead of me
     Stretches a line of cars. On each side tilled

And verdant fields, and now a shaded road
     'Mid tall and stately trees in serried ranks,
A breath o' cool, and far below a town
     Nestled along a twisting river's banks.

A military band blares as we turn
     The corner, twenty strong, and come to rest.
Drivers descend, and wipe their dusty eyes
     They seem like white-clad ghosts. Who would have guessed

That once those cars were blue? Well, now we're through.
     A cold meal (it's too late to start the fire),
A wash, down in the brook, and then to bed
     A well-earned sleep ; what more could one desire?

Arthur U. CROSBY.
S.S.U. 13 (631)

-------------------------------

 

DEATH OF TWO FORMER FIELD SERVICE SECTION LEADERS

Paul-B. Kurtz, aged 24, who in 1915-1916 served for many months as a driver in section 1 and who in 1917 was for a few months the commanding officer of Section 18 and subsequently entered the American aviation service was killed in action on May 16th. While flying over the German lines his machine came down in flames. Mr. Kurtz was a graduate of Harvard University and his home was in Philadelphia. He was a popular member of this service and will be deeply regretted by all of his old comrades.

Roger-Marie-Louis Balbiani who was a member of section 1 during the first year of its history and served during the latter months of 1915 as commanding officer of that section, has also been killed in action in the aviation service. Mr. Balbiani was the first member of the American Field Service to he decorated with the Croix de guerre with palm, having received a citation à l'ordre de l'armée in November 1915.

-------------------

FELICITATIONS

Au P. C., le 17 mai 1918.

ORDRE GÉNÉRAL N° 594

Dans les durs combats qui livrent en ce moment, le Personnel Américain de la S.S.U. 65 fait, comme par le passé, l'admiration des officiers et soldats de la 121e D.I.)

Toujours prêts à se porter d'eux-mêmes en avant dans les zones les plus battues par le feu ennemi, les Américains s'exposent volontairement pour sauver et évacuer nos blessés.

Dignes Fils dc leur grande Patrie, ils montrent l'initiative, l'audace, le calme courage de leur Race.

Au nom de leurs frères d'Armes français, le Général Commandant la Division, les remercie et les félicite.

Le Général de Division TARGE
Commandant la 121e Division d'Infanterie.
A. TARGE.

-------------------

CITATIONS

The Commanding Officier of S.S.U. 628 (old Section 8) states that the following Field Service men have received the Croix de guerre

Emerson Low, Pvt.
John M. Keogh, Pvt. 1 cl.
Arthur J. Bennett, Sgt.
Ellis H. Denny, Pvt. 1 cl.
Archibald E. Lewine, Pvt. 1 cl.
William H. McNaughton, Pvt. i cl.

-------------------

NOTES
Gaston-Pire

At the American Church, rue de Berri, the marriage of Mr. Kenneth Gaston (S.S.U. 30) and Mlle Germaine Pire was solemnized yesterday morning, the pastor, Dr. Goodrich, officiating. Mr. Gaston is under instruction at the artillery school at Fontainebleau and will shortly complete his stage there.

-------------------

News has been received that Thomas B. Buffum (S.S.U. 8 and 3) who was reported as missing since May 9th is a prisoner of war and unhurt. Buffum joined the American Field Service in May 1916 and left for the front with Section 8 the same month. He was transferred to Section 3 on the departure of that Section for the Orient in October 1916 where he served until June first, 1917, returning to join the French aviation.

-------------------

F. A. Ogilvie former Chef of S.S.U. 2 has just called at the Bulletin office which he styled the Clearing House of Information on the A.F.S. members, and is on the way to England to spend a month's leave of convalescence, having been gassed. He had recently met le Père Cleret, formerly aumonier of S.S.U. 2, now a réformé at Poitiers, who was very much interested to get news from the old section.

-------------------

Word has been received from Hilton W. Long (S.S.U. 18) who entered American Aviation stating that he has received his brevet as Pilote with the American Expeditionary Forces in Italy.

-------------------

A. C. Philipps (S.S.U. 13) called in to leave his new address, so as to have the Bulletin sent to him "Somewhere in America ".

-------------------

Fifty of the non-coms and twenty officers finished the training at the Officers School at Meaux on May 23rd. Among the old Field Service men who attended were :

1st. Serg. James W. D. Seymour (S.S.U. 17) ; W. G. Rice, 1st. Lt. (S.S.U. 66) ; Robert J. McClintock (T.M.U. 133) ; Bertrand E. Tremblay (T.M.U. 526) ; Harwood B. Day (S.S.U. 1) ; Russell des Cognets Cpl. (S.S.U. 30).

-------------------

FROM CENTIGRADE TO FAHRENHEIT

To the Editor of the "Bulletin" ;

I am anxious to find out the way to figure out the A. F. S number from the U. S. A. A. S. section number and vice-versa. In other words, I want to know, whenever I see the U. S. A. A. S. number designated on an ambulance how to find out what was the former Field Service number.

Paris, December 24th, 1899.                   Old Philadelphia Lady.

-------------------

To the Old Philadelphia Lady

            Dear Old Lady,

Why the last old number of the Ambulance Sections should have been taken for the first new number goodness knows, but such is the case, making 68 No. 621. There was probably some good reason for that as well as skipping back to 6 for the next making it No. 622. Then 66 and 67 come along making 623 and 624. Next from 1 we get number 625, from 2 we get 626, from 4 we get, 627, from S we get 628 and from 9 we get 629.

Beginning with Section 12 there is a method in these changes and by adding to 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19, six hundred and eighteen, we get respectively 630, 631, 632, 633, 634, 635, 636 and 637.

However, it is necessary to add six hundred and twelve to numbers 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 in order to get the new numbers for these sections which are 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 643, 644, and 645.

Observant Citizen.

-------------------

To the Old Philadelphia Lady

For conversion to actual, section number at present time, use any one of the several excellent formulas already published in the "Bulletin".

Arthur U. CROSBY,
S.S.U. 13/631.

 

Ambulance Service ; William H. H. Childs (S.S.U. 67) U. S. A. A. S. ; William Rudkin (S.S.U. 26) American Red Cross ;.J. M. Grierson (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S. ; L. E. Ball (T.M.U. 184) Lieut. Aviation Headquarters ; J. O. Beebe (S.S.U. 30) U. S. A. A. S. ; Charles G. Curtiss (T.M.U. 526) Lieut. Q. M. R. C. ; John Craig, Jr. (S.S.U. 2) 45e brigade d'artillerie, Fontainebleau ; Samuel Chamberlain (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S. ; Russell des Cognets (S.S.U. 30) U. S. A. A. S.; J. H. Lewis (S.S.U. 16) U. S. A. A. S. ; R. G. Young (S.S.U. 15) U. S. A. A. S.; W. D. Clark (S.S.U. 15) U. S. A. A. S. ; J. M. Nazel (S.S.U. 17) U. S. A.A. S.; Duncan O. Welty Jr. (T.M.U. 526) Italian Ambulance ; Bartlett E. Wicks (S.S.U. 67) U. S. A. A. S. ; J. E. Stiles, Red Cross San Francisco ; Hugh J. Kelleher (S.S.U. 4) U. S. A. A. S. Lansing Warren (S.S.U. 18) U. S. A. A. S. ; Burnet C. Wohlford (S.S.U. 18) U. S. A. A. S. ; Arthur J. Mason (T.M.U. 526) 5th F. A. ; A. Victor Lyman (S.S.U. 9) U. S. Air Service; H. K. Sturdy Jr. (T.M.U. Ambulance Service Italy ; Bennett Wells (T.M.U. 526) 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service ; T. J. Bollmeyer (T.M.U. 526) A. R. C. Italian Service ; A. L. G. Jansen (T.M.U. 133) A. R. C. Italian Service ; Albert E. Flamand (S.S.U. 9) U. S. Naval Forces, France.

-------------------

Don't forget to contribute something for the Fourth of July number and in the words of the prophet --- DO IT NOW.

-------------------

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

A LETTER TO THE STATUE OF LIBERTY

Statue of Liberty,
Goat's Island, N. Y., U.S.A.

Dear Liberty

I am writing to ask if I can get a date with you some time in the near future. It would do me worlds of good just to get one look at you again. Don't misunderstand me --- my intentions are entirely honorable.

Perhaps you have forgotten me --- I hope not. But you'll recall that I was standing near the stern, and you waved your blowtorch at me and I winked back --- 'member? I said not to worry, that I'd get matters straightened out, and that I'd be right back. And you stood very still and watched me out of sight. How brave you were, dear lady!

Well, I've been over in your native land for some time now, and let me say I like it fine. I can see now where you get your liberal notions ---about dress and things. And they have not forgotten about you. Ask any Frenchman --- he knows what Liberty is.

Ï saw Sisters Equality and Fraternity while I was in Paris. They send regards. Also I looked up Humanity, but I haven't been able to do much for her yet. But we Americans haven't seen as much of your relatives as we should have liked. They are kind of shy of our officers, and there are too many orders floating around to allow much chance to go calling.

Perhaps after all the notoriety you've been getting lately you won't want to be going around with a common fellow like me. We've been hearing a lot about you and your enterprises and we've seen your photo pretty often. Hope your motor is coming along o.k. and your Loans. I was one of your first creditors when I subscribed (remember?) 'lest you perish. Trust your investments are proving satisfactory, but anyway, don't you worry --- it will be all right about that fifty bucks.

There's one thing you do want to be careful about, though, little girl ; and that's how you let strangers use your name. It's been flying around pretty promiscuous of late, it seems to me. Of course, it's all right for President Wilson and old friends like that, but, honestly, it looks kind of cheap to see your name on pickle jars and rubber tires. And your army beans are rotten. I think they must be some of the crimes committed in your name that Madame What-you-call-it once referred to. If I was you I wouldn't authorize 'em, but you know best.

And another thing. They tell us America is going dry, but you won't let that happen, will you, because all of us have planned a blow-out when we get back home.

Well, I hear the bugle blowing for assembly, and so you and I have got to part company. Don't forget our date, because there are several thousand other fellows here who'll want to cut me out. But I'm like Patrick Henry and I say give me you or give me death.

   P-S. --- Regards to Uncle Sam.

Faithfully, Lance
                                     S.S.U. 636 (old 18).

-------------------

 

                       WAR ANNOYANCES

The annoyances of soldiers are supposed, in civil life,
To be the shells and the bullets and the sounds of endless strife ;
They think he gets quite weary of the trenches and the guns ;
And the water and the trench raids, and the sniping of the Huns ;
But were truth known, it isn't so --- the front's a peaceful place,
And the soldier's real annoyance is the back home populace!

It's good old men who send him books of firm and helpful hints,
And tracts on keeping well and strong, and how to do up splints
It's pastors who will pray for him, and send trench Bibles, too,
And silly girls he never met who write him billets-doux
It's men who've not enlisted who always wish that he,
If he runs across a German, "Would give him hell for me ".
The romantic ladies pleading, " O, you will be such, a dear,
Now get a Boche spiked hat for me, just as a souvenir ".
The man who writes, " Be sure and 'Kan the Kaiser' while you're there",

(He sends this warlike message from his office swivel chair!)
It's people safely back at home who always sternly write;
The country hasn't wakened to the fact we're in the fight!

They're nothing new, these pesterers of honest soldier folk,
But just the same ones, now transformed, who always will provoke
Here's just the same old pastor, with his droning parish call,
And the gossiping old neighbor with her tales beneath her shawl ;
The doctor and the lawyer, and the man who wanted war
(Who pleaded his exemption so that he could run his store!)
Here's the meddler and the loafer, the boring family friend,
The silly debutante who chatters nothing hours on end ;
The gusher of the tea room now is hunting souvenirs -
The "Ladies Temperance Circle " is still down on wines and beers.

All, all are here --- they're mobilized "to help to win the war",
They'll do their bit back there at home", though heaven knows what for!

The soldier has two enemies --- one front of him, one rear
And the latter's most annoying, say the soldier men out here!

R. A. D.
                               S. S. U. 636 (old 18).

-------------------

LETTERS TO THE BULLETIN

May 31, 1918.

          Dear Editor

I want to thank some body for having sent to me two copies of the Field Service Bulletin, also the letter inviting all of us old men back to 21, rue Raynouard --- to make it our home when we 're in Paris. But I don't know now to whom to write unless it be to you.

I did n't realize how much the " Bulletin " meant to me until I read these two copies after having left the Service some months ago. I'm now in Heavy Artillery but I shall never love any work more than that which I did with my ambulance, and it did me a world of good to receive a word from "21, rue Raynouard" and know that we're not entirely forgotten and that there is still a connection between us and the Old Service.

The Bulletins are great. I'm enclosing five francs hoping your new issues will follow me around until they find me.

May I thank you again for news from "Twenty-one" and may the Service ever continue as it was before we entered the struggle.

Sincerely,

Harry C. ROTH.
(Formerly S. S. U. 14).

-------------------

S. S. U. 627 (Erstwhile 4).

          Dear Ed :---

Never had the pleasure of meeting you, Old Man, but I'm going to ask you a favor. In several of the recent issues of the Bulletin you've had contributions from one P. C. Doolittle, S. S. U. 627. There is no such name on our muster roll, and there's no one in the section who will admit the pseudonym. Because I locked a journalistic skeleton up in the closet a year ago and became a "Friend of France" I am getting the blame --- or credit, depending on one's literary taste --- for Friend Doolittle's genius. Therefore, Ed, the favor I ask is that you re-establish my reputation for me ; and, if P. C. has another name, let its know what latent l. l. (literary light) burns among us and we will do homage to his flickerings.

As to Section Once-was 4, Now is 627, we are alive and kicking in the customary way. There are a few châteaux as yet unvisited but we expect to remedy that soon. Seeing so many men in uniform about we are convinced that the war is still having a successful run up here, but they seem to have the S. R. O. sign out ; --- and did you ever hear of an ambulancier who would stand up when he might be able to sit down elsewhere? We do a bit of evacuation work now and then.

We had a baseball game yesterday between the Stay-at-Homes and the Gad-abouts. N, B. The Gad-abouts did the rolling of yesterday. The Gad-abouts won 16 to 7, mainly because the Stay-at-Homes couldn't field or hit --- a very good reason. The game was called at the end of the seventh on account of dinner. Otherwise there's nothing to report except progress.

Once again, Ed. please let me implore you to clear up the mystery because when I write anything I always sign myself,

Dick WESTWOOD.

Editor's foot-note. We have just received a letter from the author of "The Death Fires" in Bulletin No 43'and of "A lost Art" in No 44 who has very just cause for complaint as he states that we have given him a nom-de-plume and concealed his section number. Kindly note the correct signature is S. C. Doolittle, S.S.U. 621/68, and we will not do it again.

-------------------

          To the Editor of the Bulletin

I am sending you a line about the Field Service detachment in the Boston Liberty Loan Parade.

There were just fifty nine old Field Service men in line. Many of them belonged to the Harvard R. O. T. C., Naval Reserve, or other branches of service, but were only too eager to be released from marching with their respective organizations in order to join the Field Service group. Although all applications for positions in the parade had closed the previous Saturday, our boys were given a place in the first division. They were led by Mr. Richard Lawrence, one of the older men in the Service (S.S.U 3)

From where we started in upper Back Bay, all the way down Arlington Street and Beacon Street and back to Park Square, the biggest crowd that Boston ever saw was lined ten deep along the curb. We came right behind the British tank and the ambulance section of the Home Guard ; right in the heart of things, as it were. We got an enthusiastic reception --- only the Civil War veterans, they told us, got a better. But I believe that the crowd hardly realized what a queer set of paraders they were seeing.

To begin with, we didn't know how to march. Many knew the Infantry Drill Regulations ; but some were quite ignorant of them. We lined up, fifty-nine of us. Every time the column turned a corner, we thought it would get mixed up in the crowd. If our fashion of marching wasn't individual enough, our uniforms were. There were the early nondescripts of 1915, the English officers' outfits of 1916, and the plain American tunics of last summer. Some had helmets, some fatigue caps, some plain caps, some French kepis. There were gas masks and canes and musettes---and a number of Croix de Guerre. One fellow annexed a French flag and carried it as proudly as if he were the standard bearer of a division of chasseurs.

The day was much too hot for comfort, and the longlegged men in the front ranks marched too quickly for the shorter heroes in the rear. However, after an hour's strain we reached the end in safety. The other eighty thousand in the parade --- the unimportant part of it --- were still marching at nine o'clock that night. We didn't stay to watch them, however. About half of the fellows went back to 40 State Street. The rest split up into little groups and held miniature reunions all over the city. Almost anywhere in Boston that night you could hear talk about pinard and marmites and briquets and how to get back over.

Yours very truly,

Malcolm COWLEY,
(T.M.U. 526).

A. F. S. Men in the Liberty Loan Parade.

Gordon Allen T.M.U. 397
Stanley Birch T.M.U. 184
Claflin Davis S.S.U. 4
Malcolm Cowley T.M.U. 526
Robert Cunningham S.S.U. 66
Harry Cox T.M.U. 526
Charles Conway S.S.U. 19
Charles Eaton T.M.U. 397
Guernsey Frost T.M.U. 184
A. B. Frenning S.S.U. 30
Harold Alberts T.M.U. 184
Rev. E. G. Guthrie A.F.S. Headquarters
Oliver Hagan S.S.U. 18
Stephen Hall S.S.U. 8
Chester Hull T.M.U 184
Cedric Haskell T.M.U. 526
Thomas Hinchliffe S.S.U. 19
Ray Higgins T.M.U. 397
Leo Hayes T.M.U. 184
J. B. Hitchins T.M.U. 537
J. Holmes T.M.U. 537
Robert T. Knowles S.S.U. 13.
Frederic Perkins S.S.U. 13
Harold Whipp S.S.U. 13
Lester King T.M.U. 397
Francis P. Kendall S.S.U. 10 and 12
Richard Lawrence S.S.U. 3
Francis Lord S.S.U. 29
J. B. Mabon Jr. S.S.U. 65
J. R. Milne S.S.U. 28
Sumner B MacDonald S.S.U. 10 and 12
Herbert Miller T.M.U. 184
Edward O'Connell S.S.U. 1
Herbert Pollock T.M.U. 184
Harry Pierce S.S.U. 18
C. H. Rogers T.M.U. 23
C. U. Shreve S.S.U. 4
Philip D. Orcutt S.S.U. 31
Theodore Stewart S.S.U. 18
Robert Savory S.S.U. 18
H. W. Shepard S.S.U. 30
William T. Thompson (Boston Office)
Frank M. Wendell Jr. S,S.U. 20
Durbin Rowland S.S.U. 66
Percy Wanamaker S.S.U. 27
Harvey Williams S.S.U. 26
Ira J. Williams T.M.U. 184
Sherman Whipple, Jr T.M.U. 184
W. H. C. Walker S.S.U. 2
Berkeley Wheeler S.S.U. 27
Joseph Weeks T.M.U. 133

-------------------

FRANK BAYLIES IS CITED FOR LEGION

Frank L. Baylies, formerly of S. S. U. 1 and S. S. U. 3, now the "ace" of American "aces" since Lufbery is gone, has been cited for a first-lieutenancy in the French army and for the Legion of Honor. He is officially credited with having shot down eleven enemy machines, in addition to which he has scored several "unofficial " victories.

Frank Baylies already wears the Médaille Militaire and the Croix de Guerre with two palms and is at present in Paris on short leave.

Trained at the Avord Camp, on a Blériot, he went to the front in November, 1917. He bagged his first enemy aeroplane last February.

-------------------

VISITORS AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

A. E. Bluethenthal (S.S.U. 3), French Aviation ; Paul Tison (S.S.U. 1 and T. M. U. 526) A. R. C. Italian Service ; Robert H. Roland (T.M.U. 184), A. R. C., Italian Service ; John H. Chipman (T.M.U. 184), A. R. C. Italian Service ; L. H. Tenney (S.S.U. 12 and 3) Cpl. 5th F. A. ; George E. Dresser (T.M.U. 526), A. R. C. Italian Service ; Rowland W. Dodson (T.M.U. 184) A. R. C. Italian Service ; Frank I. Cary (T.M.U. 526), Aviation; G. H. Condell (S.S.U. 66), French Army Y. M. C. A. ; Don Asa Bigelow (S.S.U. 17) 1st Lieut. American Air Service ; W. F. Anderson (S.S.U. 8) Cpl. U. S. A. A. S. ; Kenneth C. Wesley (S.S.U. 69) American Red Cross ; Harry D. Wood (S.S.U. 69) Pvt. American Red Cross ; Lloyd E. Walsh (S.S.U. 68) Sgt. American Red Cross ; Joseph Bixby (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S. ; James C. Prosser (T.M.U. 397) ; B. Emmet Hartnett (T.M.U. 397) A. R. C. [...]

 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

SONG

Rose-white the dreamy days of spring burst, forth
        But still there sometimes blows
A dreary, chilling wind from out the North
        That blights the rose.

At night the young delighted crescent moon
        Sings, starlit, through the sky---
Yet often clouds reach out and still too soon
        Its melody.

But wind and cloud, you cannot touch the spirit
        Of rose-white youth, who fling
Their blossoming lives away, for they inherit
        Eternal spring.

Paul M. FULCHER,
S.S. U. 631 (né 13).

-------------------

 

                                   THE POILUS

They aren't so much to look at in their clothes of faded blue,
And with all their kits and traps they wouldn't pass a stiff review;
They look at rules and regulations with only half an eye,
And the gendarmes set to watch them turn, their backs and let them by;
They're a slender, moustached bunch of men, and little every one,
But for all of their appearance they're a match for any Hun!

Oh the Poilus, the Poilus, with their guns upon their back.
Every time they've met the Hun they've given him the sack;
When hell is popping on the front, no matter how or where,
You will find that it's the Poilus who are sticking it, out there.

When Joffre said, " We'll hold the Marne, " they. gave the Germans hell,
Then they knocked the spots from Fritzy down along the Somme as well ;
Along the Aisne they set to rout the Kaiser's Prussian Guard,
And they broke up his return attacks and whipped him yard by yard;
When Pétain said, " They shall not pass, " before that hell, Verdun,
They stuck it and they proved to be a match for any Hun!

Oh the Poilus, the Poilus, with their guns upon their back,
They've done the job up thoroughly, defending or attack;
It makes no difference what the work, it makes no matter where,
You will find that it's the Poilus who are sticking it, out there.

In Belgium or in Alsace, or down along the Aisne,
At Verdun, or at Craonne, or down in the Champagne,
Take them in artillery, or take them in the tanks,
Or take them in the aeroplanes, or take them in the ranks,
Anywhere along the line, they're scrappers every one,
And they've fought it out and proved it, for they've cleaned up on the Hun!

Oh the Poilus, the Poilus, with their guns upon their back,
They aren't so very showy, but they've got the soldier's knack ;
In summer heat or winter snow, or in the star shell's flare,
It will always be the Poilus who will stick it out, out there!

R. A. DONALDSON
S. S. U. 636 (old 18).

-------------------

 

AMERICAN NEGRO AND SENEGALESE

They stare at one another, have forgot
The common tongue they spoke once long ago ;
Yet by some instinct unexplained, they know
That in a bygone age, their common lot
Perhaps lay in a feverish jungle spot.
They see again the sullen rivers flow,
They feel the plague-winds, poison-laden, blow
And scent some prisoner seething in the pot.

Their race speaks for them, black replies to black.
They grin with friendships inarticulate,
Old memories strive in vain again to track
Those pathless centuries, before the Great
Tormentor cast the world upon the rack
And tied again the ravelings of their fate.

Paul M. FULCHER,
S. S. U. 631 (né 13).

-------------------

 

DEATHS

WILLIAM B. HAGAN

News has been received that William B. Hagen has recently died from scarlet fever at Toronto, where he was serving in the Royal Flying Corps. Hagan was 22 years old. He entered the American Field Service in May 26, 1917, was a member of S. S. U. 12 until October 31, 1917. His home was at Brookline, Massachusetts.

PERCY L. AVARD

We have just learned that Percy L. Avard died of pneumonia at the Naval Hospital, Charleston, S. C.

Avard, whose home was in New York City, was thirty two years old. He entered the Field Service on July 31st, 1915, and was at one time in 5. S. U. 12 but spent the most of his service in the Paris Squad. He left the Field Service on July 15th, 1916.

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F, S. MEN

Herbert Knapp Sturdy, Jr. T. M.U. 397 Pvt. American Rd Cross Italian Ambulance Service.
Robert Randolph Ball S.S.U. 69 Eleve Aspirant, 52e Brigade, Ecole militaire d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau,
Louis G. Caldwell S.S.U. 65 Eleve Aspirant, Ecole militaire d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.
George E. Dresser T.M.U. 526 U. S. Tank Service.
Raymond A. Neynaber S.S.U. 69 U. S. Tank Service.
John Nichols S.S.U. 10 U. S. Tank Service.
Alfred. P. Crease S.S.U. 27 1st. Light Tank Corps, A. E. F.
Beecher H. Fonda S.S.U. 27 1st. Light Tank Corps, A. E. F.
Samuel A. Clark S.S.U. 27 1st. Light Tank Corps, A.E.F.
William E. Phelps S.S.U. 27 1st. Light Tank Corps, A.E.F.
Robert W. Scott S.S.U. 27 1st. Light Tank Corps, A. E. F.
Robert R. Jewett S.S.U. 27 French Auto. School at Meaux.
William P. Smith, Jr. S.S.U. 27 Field Artillery School.
Carl A. Randau S.S.U. 10 Officers School at Meaux.
Albert Magnus S.S.U. 31 Officers School at Meaux.
T. S. Bosworth Post Office Officers School at Meaux.
Edward H. Page S.S.U. 2 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
Benj. F. Etter S.S.U. 2 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
Edward L. Hicks S.S.U. 26 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
William D. Swan S.S.U. 10 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
Milton G. Silver S.S.U. 65 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
G. R. Perkins (1915) S.S.U. 3 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
T. W. Patterson T.M.U. 526 Course in Field Artillery at Army Candidate's School for Officers.
George Cheney Seeley T.M.U. 526 Artillery School, A. E. F.
Clarence Bates French T.M.U. 184 Naval Reserve Flying Corps U. S. A.
Thomas P. Hinchliffe S.S.U. 19 In the draft.
Francis P. Kendall S.S.U. 2 Aviation Section, S. E. R. C. U.S.A.
Percy Weston Wanamaker S.S.U. 27 Pvt. Coast Artillery Corps U. S. A.
William Wallace White S.S.U. 65 Cadet, U. S. Aviation Ohio State University.

-------------------

VISITORS AT 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

John D. Sanford (S. S. U. 68) U. S. A. A. S. ; Arthur E. Hazeldine (S. S. U. 68) U. S. A. A. S.; N. H. Reynolds (T. M. U. 537) U. S. A. A. S. ; Roger H. Lutz (Headquarters) American Red Cross; Edwin R. Baldridge (S. S. U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; Joseph Bixby (S. S. U. 2) U. S. A. A. S. ; Richard G. Spencer (S. S. U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Theodore B: Brumback (S. S. U 66) Italian Ambulance Service, A. R. C. ; H. G. Iselin (S. S. U. 4) 1st. Lieut; U. S. A. A. S. ; Sidney B. Ashmore (S. S. U. 13) U. S. A. A. S. ; Albert Mayoh (T. M. U. 397) Air Service Headquarters ; Frank E. Coaly (S. S. U. 68) U. S. A: A. S. ; Donald K. Miller (T. M. U. 397) Q. M. Corps; Paul Niesley (S. S. U. 13) U. S. A. A. S. ; Edward S. Storer (S. S. U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; John Nichols (S. S. U. 10) U. S. Tanks Service ; J. Marquand Walker (S. S. U. 3) Field Artillery ; Richard G. Spencer (S. S. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Robert H. Roland (T. M. U. 184) ; George E. Dresser (T. M. U. 526) U. S. Tank Service; Raymond A. Neynaber (S. S. U. 69) U. S. Tank Service; Albert Magnus (S. S. U. 31) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; T. S. Bosworth (S. S. U. et Post Office) Top-Sgt. U. S. A. A. S.; Norman S. Buck (T. M. U. 133) Construction Dept. Aviation Service ; D. J. Post, Jr. (S. S. U. 9) American Red Cross, Transportation ; Albert L. G. Jansen (T: M. U. 133) ; Paul Tyson (S. S. U. 3) ; Fred J. Bollmeyer (T. M. U. 526) International News ; Earl A. Haas (S. S. U. 19) U. S. A. A. S. ; C. E. Dougherty (S. S. U. 19) Sgt U. S. A. A. S.; William Phibel (S. S. U. 65) U. S. A. A. S.; John H. Boyd (Headquarters) 2nd. Lieut. Transportation Branch of Aviation. John H. Lundquist (S. S. U. 12) ; W. M. Barber (S. S. U. 3) Eleve Aspirant French Artillery; Jack Craig (S. S. U. 2) French Artillery.

-------------------

NOTES

Robert H. Roland (T. M. U. 184) is leaving for America.

-------------------

The following members of S. S. U. 630 (formerly 12) have been cited to the Ordre de Regiment:

Corporal Charles S. Wright.
Pvt. 1st. cl.. Wilfrid Douglas Bull.
Pvt. 1st. cl. Alfred Bradford Weller.
Pvt. 1st. cl. George A. Thatcher, Jr. and.
Pvt. C. B. Smith.


AFS Bulletin Number Fifty

Index