PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

AN APPEAL

The purpose of the Bulletin is to help all the former members of the Field Service to keep in touch with the old home at 21, rue Raynouard and with each other. To accomplish this it is urged that contributions of verse, stories or notes should be sent in by all of the old members, whether they are aviators, artillerymen, balloonists, naval experts, tankers, or what not. If all who read the Bulletin write for it, it will achieve its purpose.

On this account we give first space this week to the suggestions in the letter which follows from one who himself has done much to make our task easy, and to make the Bulletin interesting to its readers.

 

          Dear Editor:

The Bulletin has served the admirable purpose of keeping the sections in touch with one another, in fact, fiction and poetry. And I judge it has done the same for the many old Field Service men scattered in other branches of work. However we feel that maybe the Bulletin is getting to be too much of, by, and for the sections, and not enough for the entire "old" Field Service.

Here's a suggestion --- Why not try to get some of the old men who are in aviation, artillery, tanks, etc., etc., to write and tell us what they are doing ---give us some interesting notes on other lines of work --- to parallel the "Section Notes". There are lots of old men who have had interesting experiences in new fields. Can you not induce them to write? We would like to know how it feels to pull the string on a whole battery of soixante quinzes just as an ambulance is passing in front ; or how it seems to the heavy artillery lieutenant to telephone back "Go right on firing on the road, boys --- it's only an ambulance that's passing" --- or to sit in an observation poste and register back the direct hits on the Red Cross abris. We'd like to know how it feels to handle the throttle and pull the emergency brake on a S.P.A.D., and the sensation the airmen get when they let flop the bombs at night on the towns over in Germany ; or how it feels to raise the morale of Italy in a 1.000 franc uniform.

Of course there will be a tendency for these men to be bashful about what they are doing, but can't the editor undertake to overcome that and get some of the old men to loosen up with the Waterman? There are also numerous groups of men in the various schools and camps --Fontainebleau, Saumur, Langres, etc., whom we ought to hear from.

Anyway, it's an idea, and maybe this appeal will find some response. The men who are still in the ambulance sections would appreciate it. I know, as well as literary contributions too, from the old men --- of which there ought to be many.

ROBERT A. DONALDSON.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

CORNELIUS WINANT

Cornelius Winant (S.S.U.3) has been killed in action while serving as aspirant in a French artillery regiment. Winant joined the American Field Service in May 1916 and was sent to Section 3. He volunteered later to go to the Balkans and went, to Salonique with the Section in October 1916, remaining there until August 1917. He returned to America but soon after came back to France to join the French artillery. He was a Princeton student and his home was in New York City. Winant was 23 years of age.

-------------------

ROGER SHERMAN DIX

Word has been received of the death of Roger Sherman Dix, Jr, a former member of Section 1, who died of injuries received at the front in an airplane accident on May 16th.

Dix who was twenty-two years old, was graduated from the Country Day School in Newton and was a member of this year's graduating class at Harvard. In July, 1917, he joined the American Field Service, and when the United States took over the ambulance units in October, 1917, he enlisted in the United States air service, to which organization he belonged as a flyer at the time of his death.

The -home of his parents is in Greenbush, Mass.

-------------------

CITATION and COMMENDATION

William A. Pearl, who was grievously wounded in Section 1 last year, has received the following citation, dated June 29, 1918:

Le Général Commandant en Chef, cite à l'Ordre de l'Armée :

PEARL, William, Armour, Conducteur à la S.S.U. 1.

« Conducteur d'un courage et d'un dévouement remarquables. A été grièvement blessé le 16 août 1917, dans la région de Verdun, alors qu'il procédait à la réparation d'une voiture sous un tir intense de l'artillerie ennemie. Malgré l'affaiblissement résultant d'une abondante perte de sang, a donné toutes les indications pour la continuation du travail et s'est rendu à pied au poste de secours distant de 600 à 700 mètres. »

-------------------

General Pershing has sent a letter of congratulation to First Lieutenant Sumner SEWALL (formerly of S S. U. 8, now an officer in the American Aviation Service:

"On June 3, 1918, when on patrol, and near Menil-le-Tour, encountered and attacked six enemy aeroplanes flying north in formation, and caused the highest aeroplane to crash to the ground in flames."

-------------------

SECTION NOTES

Old Four celebrated its third Fourth of July yesterday with all sorts of éclat (figuratively) and enthusiasm. Not being en repos there were twelve members missing from the party but twenty Frenchmen took their places.

The celebration did not commence until 6,30 p. m. because the General of the Corps d'Armée came to inspect the section at 6,00 p. m. The men were lined up and ready when the General stepped from his car and the band from one of our regiments started the « Marseillaise ». Standing at a rigid fixe the General made an impressive figure as he waited for the last note of the hymn. An inspection of the men followed and then a short speech in English by the General in commemoration of the day. The band played the "Star Spangled Banner", and, as he left, the General turned and said, "Goodbye---goodbye, my friends ". So personal and sincere were these words that every man in line felt that he should answer, "Goodbye, mon general ".

Dinner was served immediately with the médecin divisionnaire as the guest of honor. The tables, inclosed in a square of fresh cut branches were covered with white paper cloths and decorated with flowers. The officers and guests were seated at the head. The meal consisted of an orange cocktail, radishes and cucumbers, chicken patties and mushrooms, roast beef, new potatoes, green beans, lobster salad and strawberry short cake. There was plenty to drink and speeches, Section Four Songs and popular airs followed.

The musicians were taken back to their posts at eleven but they haven't yet finished talking of the reception the Americans gave them --- nor will they for some days. Lieutenant Iselin told us afterwards how proud he was of the way in which the fellows had worked and acted, --- so we are all happy.

The section has selected and had registered with the French Automobile Service, a convoy sign. We selected the black cat that is used as a trade mark by the Black Cat Hosiery Company and by the Black Cat Magazine. Kitty wears a little on the neck of his big white bow and is on both forward side windows of our cars. Cat means quatre.

Dick WESTWOOD.
S.S.U. 4/627.

-------------------

S.S.U. 635 (Old 17)

Herbert S. (Slats) Harvey, whose official duty is to manicure the Fords when they are suffering from ennui, has returned to the section after an extended tour of France, during which he made personal inspection of a baker's dozen hospitals. Harvey had an argument with the crank of a cranky voiture whose idiosyncrasies were aggravated by a broken drive-shaft. Net result: One broken right arm and three months in said hospitals.

*
*   *

In honor of the Glorious Fourth, the section dragged out its boiled shirts and Fox puttees and made a pilgrimage to (deleted by the censor) where John DeWitt Toll, the ravitaillement magician, had arranged a dinner that would have done credit to Les Ambassadeurs. From soup to nuts, everything was, as Shorty Hannah remarked, Ohh Kay. Indeed, there was only one fly in the ointment (and none, praise the cook! in the dinner) and that was that nine good men and true, were among those missing.. Three men, John M. (Nip) Nazel, Sidney M. (Sid) Eddy and Ethlebert D. (Dave) Warfield, are in the hospital recovering from wounds ; Robert, (Bob) Ogden is still at the Army Candidates School, and five men, Walter G. (Walt) Garritt, William P. (Bill) Church, Chester C. (Chet) McArthur, Jefferson (Infantry) Coolidge and Lewis W. (Muss) Mustard, have been on permission and evidently are having difficulties in locating the section since its last voyage.

*
*   *

Not a little disappointment was caused in the section when it was learned that the sacrifice so cheerfully made by Dave Warfield had been in vain. Dave was evacuated to a hospital and had been admitted only a few hours when he learned that a soldier was dying and the only chance of saving his life was by blood transfusion. Dave at once volunteered and so much of his blood was taken that for awhile Dave himself was in a bad way, but now is on the road to recovery. The other soldier rallied, thanks to Dave's blood, but later he suffered a relapse and died.

*
*   *

When the section, at the end of a long, hard convoy, finally pulled into the village where they were domiciled for a few days, not a little surprise was caused when the maire and some of the village fathers met the convoy on the outskirts and presented Lieut. B. K. Neftel with the keys, and freedom of what was left of the village. History repeats itself; to be trite, and it so happened that Lieut. Neftel, then just plain Nefty and a driver in old section Eight, had spent a month in the same village in 1916, and last summer spent three weeks in the adjoining village. Curiously enough, Lieut. Neftel was assigned the same room he occupied in 1916, the maire evidently having put a bug in the major de cantonment's ear. Of old Seventeen that rested in the adjoining village, only six remain in the section now : Lieut. Neftel, Sergt. 1st Cl William P. (Old Bill) Richards, Sergt. James W. D. (Alphabet) Seymour, Mechanic Slats Harvey, Fred A. (Shorty) Hannah and Ralph B. (Pete), Johnson.

*
*   *

Lulu, the German dog captured by the section last year in the Verdun sector, and who, by the way, isn't a she anyway, is inconsolable since Corporal William W. (Wild Willie) McCarthy annexed Pete. Pete is (or was once) a cat who, by the way, isn't a he anyway. Pete evidently has suffered from the war; half of her is worn away and her coat is threadbare. Wild Willie, however, insists that Pete is of a very good family and as he is a cat fancier, this may be so.

The section now is worried as to whether Wild Willie is going to try to repeat over here the experiments he made in the states. McCarthy's caterie, or whatever you call 'em, was once the pride of Evanston, and he takes great pride in forever exhibiting to the members of the section, the many baby blue rosettes won by his erstwhile championettes. The bureau is littered with pictures of his favorites posed gracefully on cushions on his knees. One of Wild Willies greatest regrets is that cats cannot write letters, as he has been without intimate news of his caterie since he has been in France, and is forever worrying that they may be indisposed or even ill.

*
*   *

How doth the little busy bee
Each shining hour improve?
Six-thirty-five is just the same,
Its always on the move! -

Anent the journeyings of 635 --- compared to which the Wandering Jew seems an "Oldest Inhabitant" --- five members of the section who departed on permission during a breathing space had worries a-plenty before they once more were welcomed into the bosom of the section.

Pvts 1st Cl Walt Garritt, Chet McArthur and "Muss" Mustard, and Pvts Infantry Coolidge and Bill Church, enjoyed the waters at Aix for the allotted seven days and then expended some thirteen days in getting back to their accumulated mail. After several false starts (that invariably landed them back in Paris for an evening!) they got set in the right direction, but a stern fate, etc. So it was that the five disconsolates reached several cantonments where the section had paused, to find nothing but the smoldering ashes of the cookies fire. At last, wearied and well-night penniless, they gave up in despair and started a weary hike for the nearest chemin de fer --and Paree. It was then the section, making a return---convois, ran into them (nearly) trudging along a dusty road,

Jack Tellier, whose flap-jacks have endeared him to all, has lost his taste for pinard. It all happened this way: Bill Richards, the genial first sergeant, and Bill Church, the only artist the section boasts, formed a partnership for developing and printing films. Business was brisk, so brisk in fact that the Bills carelessly left a bottle of hypo lying around --- at a time when the pinard supply was low. Jack wandered by at the time and pounced upon the bottle, taking a long, loving pull before his taster flashed a belated warning. After a most disagreeable two hours, during which Jack paid shameless disregard to Hoover's injunction not to waste food, he took a solemn vow never to look upon pinard more.

J. B. C.

-------------------

S.S.U. 636 (old. 18)

According to the best of rumors that float in to us thru the medium of poilus, American news-papers, etc., etc., the war is still going on. We were well aware of the fact about three weeks ago, when we made some rather unwilling altho extensive investigations regarding the explosive quality of German obus. The examination was made at close range --- too close --- and lasted the period of two weeks. The Kaiser's government furnished ample material for the research. In fact they sent it faster than we wanted it, and it was all we could do to get thru it. However it is tranquil now, and as far as we are concerned, if the German government is willing, we will consider the matter closed.

Permissions have started again by Foch's order (Foch knows what he is doing, believe us!) and Wohlford and Warren report that they managed to have a good time at Aix in spite of the Y.M.C.A.

About twenty members of the section were taken down, a short time ago with grippe, and the barracks resembled a hospital ward for about a week. All the malades pronounced themselves highly in favor of the French medical system. The Doc in attendance prescribed "either tea or champagne", for the convalescents. Lipton's sales were as usual, but Oh what a jump Moet and Chandon stock took! It took the boys a long time to convalescence. We are still wondering, however, whether the Medecin was trying to kid us when he called the malady "Trench fever !"

The section has been adopted by two dogs, "Pinard" and "Cyclops ". We have also developed a new poet, W. Roy Cornish, "At the Front" if you please. Mr. Cornish has just arrived with the Casuals. He has been contributing to the Field Service Bulletin, where his admirable verses are widely read.

Corporal Ritter Holman delighted the section the other day, when he threw his Moss's Military Manual away, hoisted the section's Bolcheviki flag, and declared that he didn't care how soon the war ended. The ensuing celebration could be heard for miles around.

The section orchestra, composed of Mr. Jas. Irwin, Sgt., Mr. Theo Chunn, "Lieut" Jackie Cregier, and M. André Brasseur, French sous-chef and violin artist, has been fiddling, and strumming away during the offensive in an attempt to reproduce Nero's musical --- career. It failed, however, as Rome refused to fall, owing largely to the machinations of the French poilu. The boys have got such a swing to "Chinatown" that one can fairly hear all the Chinks in San Francisco hitting the chop-suey and making away with the fu-gar-yuk.

Mr. Heintz Wallace has laid away the dice for the time being, put a rubber around the sheaf of fixe franc notes --- which used to be the section's pay, and has left on permission. Unfortunately he didn't get a chance to make his "date". But she is probably enjoying Nice, and is quite oblivious to the fact that Mr. Wallace is disporting himself at Aix.

Beyond that, nothing much new. We wish to extend our sympathy to the sections which have suffered losses. The deaths which have taken place prove that the service was ready when called on, and did its duty, even to the big sacrifice. The men who have fallen have sacrificed something for all of us, and we honor them, and offer our sincere sympathy to their parents, their friends and their sections. '

Section 636,
(old 18)

-------------------

FIELD SERVICE LITERATURE

A little volume of experiences and impressions of old Field Service days has just appeared under the title "An Ambulance Driver in France", the author being Philip Sidney Rice of old Field section 1. The volume contains recollections of the work of Section 1 in 1917 in the Champagne region, at Verdun and in Lorraine. It is published in Wilkes Barre, Pa.

-------------------

The Princeton Alumni Bulletin devotes a column to the volume "Ambulance 464" by Julian H. Bryan, a Princeton Freshman, who was a member of old Field Service section 12 in the volunteer ante-bellum days from January until July 1917. The following extracts are taken from this article:

"But it is no longer midnight, as I headed the first page of today's diary. My watch tells me that I have been, writing for two hours. I had intended to go to bed after I had finished this but my good friend Angeron, the brancardier, says no. There are « encore des, blessés » outside. "

There is the spirit, the manner of writing and the whole story of "Ambulance 464". Written as a deed to pen account of work at the French front with the American Field Service in the days just before and after our entrance into the war, Mr. Bryan, who is now a student in Princeton, has put before us an account of the war, as youth sees it, in an unstudied, unsophisticated way that is most appealing.

No discussion of great issues and plans of nations clog its pages. Yet there comes the account of the one great moment when news was received at the front that the United States had openly joined the righteous cause's forces.

"I don't believe I was ever prouder of America than at that moment ; and as they pointed to a faded old banner hanging from their smoke-blackened ceiling, in which one could barely distinguish the colors, and I showed them the little American flag pinned to my coat, we realized that the « bleu, blanc et rouge » and the « Red, White and Blue » were one and the same thing."

Mr. Bryan has given us a vivid picture of the day’s life and work with the American Ambulance, driving the dauntless Fords, frolicking in one way or another after the day's or night's work was at an end, frying an egg in vaseline, or in whatever sort of grease is used in an automobile, over a fire composed of the legs of a shattered mahogany table, working away in the face of cold and discomfort, with the « encore des blessés » always spurring the men on. So beautifully unconscious of all this is the story, and so matter of fact is it in its simple telling of what soon appeared the natural thing in life to its writer, that the impression given by the book is continually intensified and heightened.

"Ambulance 464" is the embodiment and account of the spirit of service, not that cant phrase that is in so many mouths, "blind mouths," one is almost tempted to write in Milton's words, but the true spirit of service, of doing a thing because it is the right thing to do, because it helps, and because, in spite of the fact that it does help others, there is a lot of fun in it.

-------------------

LETTER TO THE BULLETIN

13th Engineers, A. E. F.
July 1, 1918.

Dear Old,
American Field Service,
In France.

I have been wishing I had some sort of a little pin or emblem to wear as a memento of my service with the American Field Service.

I am proud of my short connection with it because of the name and reputation the American Field Service bears, and because it was a volunteer service conceived and opened to us in advance of the main Army of Americans coming across. Dozens of the same dirty old "hunks-a-tin" whirl past our camp every day, and they never fail to stir memories of the old days when I steered "32908" about the rough roads and dirty villages of northern France, with a bit of affection for the ambulance and fellowship for the driver.

Why don't you get out a very small pin that ex-Field Service men may wear, perhaps in. two sizes --- one to be worn under the pocket flap of the uniform, the other as a fob. Notify us and we'd all like to buy them.

With regards to as many of my old friends as may still be at Rue Raynouard.

William-Henry CUTLER,
(Old S.S.U. 9).

-------------------

NOTES

The following old American Field Service men have been commissioned 1st. Lieutenant U.S.A.A.S.

Leroy L. Harding (S.S.U.67).
Leland S. Thompson (S.S.U.69).
Oliver H. Shoup (S.S.U.28).
Robert D. McDougall (S.S.U.30).
James W. D. Seymour (S.S.U.17).
F. F. Wallace (S.S.U.33).
Archibald Dudgeon (S.S.U.14).
Myron Wick (S.S.U.15).
Walter Leighton Clark (S.S.U.12).

-------------------

Mr. Hohenzollern favored us with a carte de visite, labelled "Grusse aus der Ferne " --- at tea time the other afternoon. Merci Willy!

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Luke C. Doyle (S.S.U.3). Capt. Ambulance Co. 12, 1st. Division. U.S.A. American E.F.
James A. Gamman (S.S.U.13). 1er Regt. Légion Etrangère, 1re Compagnie.
Edward Daniel Kneass, Jr. (S.S.U.10). Serbian Relief Commission American Red Cross, Greece.
S. R. Hodges, Staff. Pvt. Royal Garrison-Artillery England.
Carroll G. Riggs (S.S.U.2). 1st. Lieut. Headquarters Co. Regt. 62 C.A.C. U.S.A.
Paul B. Watson, Jr. (S.S.U.3). 1st. Lieut. F.A.U.S.R. American E.F.
Donald G. Tarpley (T.M.U.526). 2nd. Lieut. E.N.A. C/o Direction of Construction. & Forest Hdqts. S.O.U.- S.O.S. A.E.F.
John R. Brown (S.S.U.1) Capt. Inf. U.S.R., Camp Devens, Mass.
E. H. Tilton (T.M.U.184). B.S.P.D.U. N°. 1 American E.F.
D. M. Hinrichs (T.M.U.526). Lieut. Motor Trans. Service Hdq. S.O.S. A.E.F.
J. Richard Eisenhart (T.M.U.155) Sgt. 1st. Cl., Motor Transport School N° 1, A.E.F.
James L. Thompson (S.S.U.13 & 65) 1st. Lieut. 324th F.A. Hq. Co., A.E.F.
Henry H. Houston (S.S.U.12 & T.M.U.133) Lieut. Hdq. 53rd Field Artillery. Brigade, A.E.F.
Arthur E. Ralston   2nd. Lieut. Q.M.R.C., American Mission, M.T.S.
Joseph T. Walker, Jr. (T.M.U.133) 25e Artillerie, 48 Batterie French Artillery.
L. B. Cummings (S.S.U.4). Captain Infantry, N.A., Louisville, Ky.
J. M. Janes (S.S.U.2). Pvt. U.S. Field Artillery U.S.A.
John Forbes Amory (S.S.U.4). Pvt. Organisation Hdqts. Co. 107 U.S. Infantry, A.E.F.
Sigurd Hansen (S.S.U.4). Vacuum Oil Company, Paris.
Charles Bayly, Jr. (S.S.U.26). Aspirant 3° Batterie, 38 Regt. d'Artillerie.
J P. Scott (T.M.U.537). Lieut. Q.M.R.C. Hdqts. M.T.S.
David W. Lewis (S.S.U.3). 2nd. Lieut. U.S. Air Service American E.F.
William C. Harrington (S.S.U.4). Corp. Hdq. Co. 18th FA. American E.F.
Melvin F. Talbot (S.S.U.9). Asst. Paymaster U.S.N.
Philip C. Lewis (S.S.U.1). 1st. Lieut. Co. I, 150th Inf. Camp Shelby, Miss.
Bennett Wells (T.M.U.526). 1st. Lieut. U.S. Air Service American E.F.
Joseph S. Bigelow Jr. (S.S.U.2). 2nd. Lieut. A.S.S.R.C.U.S.A.

-------------------

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

ABOUT BOOKS

The worst thing about war is its boredom. And this the ambulance men, probably more than any other Americans in France, are beginning to discover, for they have, as a group, been over here longer and have had more continuous service at the front. The newness and glamour which used to hold our interest is pretty well departed by this time. It is an undeniable fact that we are getting bored. And we are even frightened, at times, by contemplating the stretch of mental inertia ahead of us before the war ends. We have tired of writing home accounts of the obuses which fell near us. We don't want to talk about the war or think about it any more than we have to.

Arrived at this mental stage, the best thing we can do is to look around for some side line that will keep us profitably busy and enjoyably interested. There is always reading, and a good supply of interesting reading matter can easily be kept on hand if those who know something of book-lore will make lists, and either take up collections to buy books or buy them out of the company funds. Practically any books in the world may be bought or ordered thru Paris. With a little care sections can always keep in reading matter, and the most may be made of the opportunity to read a lot of good literature, that part of it, anyway, which isn't dull --- and it is a larger part than most believe. There are plenty of books you "have always meant to read " which you can get now. Good magazines are also a necessity ---something beside the absurdities of the Literary Digest, and the drivel of McClure's --- (the "Win the War" magazine!) There are plenty of interesting excursions to be made into the realm of poetry, novels, history and biography.

Also, you were probably interested in some particular studies before you came to France. Why not take them up again? Send for the books, and start your studies again. There are lots of interesting sidelights you call get now which you would never get otherwise. Also you will probably find someone in the section who is more or less interested in the same studies. Get him to take them up too. You will have more in common, and can pass away many a good hour talking things over. There are also many things which you probably have wanted to look into, but have never had the time or the opportunity. There is probably someone in your section who knows something about them. Get him to give you the "dope". Read up on them, and talk it over. You will be surprised at the remarkable variety of subjects you will find represented in the men of your section. Lots of times groups of men will find a lot of pleasure in studying together ----if they will only take the trouble to start it.

Or maybe you have some "line" ----perhaps you write, draw, or the like. It is a good thing to develop. Perhaps you were studying law, or mathematics, before you came over, or economies, history or business administration. Why not continue it? Develop your profession as well as your avocation. We are spending some of the best time in our lives here. We are inactive in our real work, and are tending to get rusty mentally. The war isn't a very interesting or a very constructive thing, and the tendency is to do nothing because one has such unparalleled opportunities for doing it, such a long endless prospect of army life ahead of him. He draws his pay, food, and what is sometimes considered lodging, and is only required to work occasionally. We can't change war and make it any more pleasant, but we can, it least, change our spare time and get something out of it. We don't want to get mentally stale during the war. It would be a calamity. Do Something! Keep the enthusiasm of your old interests burning. You'll have a better time, enjoy life more, and be able to look back on your time as more or less well spent, and at least as not entirely wasted.

*
*   *

And, speaking of books, there ought to be some medium thru which we can get book lists. Not so much the book lists of the latest popular novels --- one can always get those from the current magazines --- but lists of standard works, out-of-the-way books of interest, biography, travel, etc. Also it would be good to get lists of the best works on the various histories ---France, Germany, Russia, Italy, the Near East and Far East, the African Question, the countries of South America,. Very often it is not satisfactory to pick books of this sort at random. Lists of standard fiction, particularly more or less modern fiction of some consequence, would be very welcome. Then sections could pick out and order what books they would like. The main thing in book buying is not to waste money on trash. With a little care a section call get a good library, and keep it up. Perhaps even some medium might be established thru Rue Raynouard, or the Service Headquarters, to send in the books which have been read, and to get others --- thus passing the benefits around.

Why not have a number of people, who know them, recommend books from time to tithe? Why not get various people who know the various branches of history, law, science, economics, and literature to make out lists for us. You probably know many people so qualified. Why not write and ask them for such lists ? And send them along to be published? --- The Bulletin would be a good medium. It would be appreciated by everyone. The Bulletin might, too, be a good medium for book reviews of new books of more or less interest to men of the service. There are many worth while books coming out continually, and while no one reads all of them, yet, here and there, nearly all of the ones worth reading are read. There are many in the service competent to give good written reviews of them. Why not let these do it? It would aid in giving us pointers. And also the editors of the Bulletin and those more in touch with Paris might have reviewed any new and interesting books as they happen to learn of them.

Anyway, this book situation is one worth considering. By a little co-operation we can probably work it out to the advantage of all. How about further opinions and suggestions on the subject? -

(Contributed.)

-------------------

MALLET RESERVE IS COMPLETE AMALGAM
OF FRENCH AND AMERICANS

In a summer when, again and again, the historic phrase, "Franco-American troops", makes its appearance in the communiqués, the distinction of being the most complete amalgam of the two armies belongs to that flying squadron of emergency transportation, that trundling troop of trucks, that charging company of camions, the Mallet Reserve.

This organization consists of 700 5-ton trucks---American trucks driven over French roads, driven now by French, now by American drivers, officered by French and American officers, carrying French and American troops, French and American ammunition.

The Mallet Reserve is so named because its commanding officer is Major Mallet of the French Cavalry, and is called a Reserve because it is attached to no Army corps, but rather is held in reserve for emergency duty whenever a crisis in the war brings a crisis in transportation. This means that the interminable line of camions bearing the Mallet mark will invariably appear wherever things are hottest, that the trucks and their drivers know no rest from one year's end to the other.

Thus, you saw them along the roads up Cambrai way last fall. When French troops were rushed into the gap that opened during the German drive of March 21, Mallet trucks carried them, and they were Mallet trucks which bore northward the French soldiers who made their sudden and startling appearance among the British in Flanders during the April fighting. The American troops and ammunition that were moved with a rush to the lines of the Château-Thierry front were transported, many of them, in the home-grown camions of the Mallet Reserve.

The trucks themselves, if you examine them, tell many a story of transport under shell-fire, tell of machine gunners borne to the very rim of the battle so that the gunners need only drop from the camion, run across a field and start firing.

The personnel of the Mallet Reserve numbers 3,500. Of these 1,300 are Americans. Some of the Americans are alumni of the old American Field Service ; some of the officers began as ambulanciers with that group of volunteers who preceded the A.E.F. Some of the Americans who drive these trucks first learned their trade at the wheel of their own fast roadsters back home ; some of them learned it in that company of lower East Side taxi-drivers who were for ever appearing in the gang-fights which used to excite New York when there were no greater fights to absorb its attention.

They live in their trucks, sleep in their trucks. They move over France like gypsies. Whenever a groupement, group or company withdraws from the road into a field for a few. days rest and repair, the trucks still serve as tents.

Time was when each truck dragged its driver's quarters behind in the form of a trailer, but it was found that this wasted gas, so the trailers were abolished, and the drivers of the Mallet Reserve now move and live in their trucks as a turtle lives in its shell.

From the "Stars and Stripes"
             July 12, 1918.

-------------------

EXTRACT FROM INAUGURAL ADDRESS
OF PRESIDENT K. C. M. SILLS
Of Bowdoin College.

At a college gathering such as this we are justified in emphasizing the contribution made by our colleges in the great conflict for freedom and humanity. It is a two fold gift --- man and ideas, although perhaps it is idle to make that separation. The great service early rendered by college boys to the cause for which we are now fighting has not, I think, been sufficiently recognized. Long before our troops were in France, earlier even than the messengers of mercy from the Red Cross went in large numbers, the drivers in the American Ambulance Field Service showed France that chivalry was not dead in America, and carried to the gallant and hard pressed French people the sympathy of the United States that was never neutral. By far the large majority of those ambulance drivers were college men ; happy, care-free lads from all parts of the Country, not without the faults of youth, but high spirited, generous representatives of the American people. They anticipated Pershing's admirable phrase, "We are here, Lafayette." And while among them and in the Foreign Legion there were many athletes and many with technical training, there were also surprisingly many who were impelled to go by that idealism that is bred of literature and science and art. Some of them, like that noble Dartmouth lad who gave his life Christmas night lie there the advance guard of that goodly company.

" Who gave their merry youth away
For the Country and for God. "

-------------------

FIELD SERVICE DAYS

Oh, I sit in my tiny voiture
As I frame up a mute protest
'Gainst the long delay of that happy day
Which will see me moving west.

For I've seen my fill of the war zone
And I sometimes don't much care
If the world's made free for democracy
If it sees me safe back there.

But there was a time to my knowledge
When I loved the, life of the road
Yes, the dug-out's wall and the midnight call
With its ghastly, groaning load.

Twas a great, wide life and a free one
In a bunch that was crammed with cheer,
Just a careless lot, troubles all forgot,
Twas the life of a volunteer.

They were days when we roamed unmolested,
And on leave went far and wide,
Days of rue Raynouard and the boulevard
With no grim M. P.'s to chide.

They can take away our cherished rights
And our well made tailored coats,
Yes, forbid our boots and decree salutes
'Long with closely fastened throats.

But there's one thing that I can still keep
In spite of the ordinance.
Its the memories --- oh, so dear to me
Of my first great days in France.

B W.---S. S. U. 18 (636).

-------------------

REPORTED SEVERELY WOUNDED

Stanley Hill (S. S. U. 28) has been reported severely wounded in the latest casualty list. Hill joined the American Field Service in May 1917, going out with Section 28. He enlisted October 1st. in the U. S. A. A. S. and has continued to be a member of the same section now 640. He was a Dartmouth student, he is 21 years of age and his home is in Lexington, Massachusetts.

-------------------

REPORTED MISSING IN ACTION

Clifford W. Wolfe (S. S. U. 14) U. S. A, A. S. 632 was reported missing in action on July ,5th, 1918. Wolfe enlisted October 30th and went out to Section 14 on November 7th, 1917. He lived it Glen Cove, Maine, was an Andover graduate, twenty-five years of age.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

JOHN R. GRAHAM

John R. Graham (S. S. U. 2) Captain Infantry U. S. Army was killed in action last week in the recent advance. Graham joined the Field Service November 17, 1915, serving six months in Section 2 and was released May 1, 1916. He was from the University of Penn, and his home was in Philadelphia.

-------------------

CARLTON BURR

Carlton Burr (S. S. U. 2 and 9) 2nd. Lieutenant in the United States Marines was killed in action on July 24th. Burr joined the Field Service in February 1916, serving for five months in Section 2. In July 1916 he became chef of Section 9 which he took to the front, and remained in charge of until January 1917. Burr was twenty-six years of age --- a graduate of Harvard University. His home was in Boston, Mass.

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Louis G. Mudge T. M. U. 526 Pvt. Co. A 327 13. N 311 Centre Tank Corps A. E. F.
Frederick J. Wilson S. S. U. 1 3rd. Division, A. E. F. 2nd. Lieut.
L. Chauvenet S. S. U. 12 & 3 4th O. T. C. at Camp Beauregard, La.
Joseph K. Wells S. S. U. 70 Lieut. Q. M. R. C. A. E. F.
G. S. Sinclair S. S. U. 12 & 3 2nd Lieut. U. S. Air Service.
W. L. Harrison S. S. U. 12 & 3 2nd Lieut. IT. S. Air Service.
Walter H. Wheeler S. S. U .3 Temporary Ensign, U. S. N.
L. H. Buckler T. M U. 526 1st Lieut. Tank Corps, A.E.F.
Lyman O. Dudley T. M. U. 537 U. S. Air Service A. E. F.
G. F. Freer S. S. U. 2 Royal Flying Corps.
George M. Hollister S. S. U. 3 2nd Lieut. Infantry 61st Regt.
P. N. Rhinelander S. S. U 9 & 10 1st Lieut. IT. S. Air Service.
Paul Squibb S. S. U. 30 2nd Lieut. F. A. R. A. E. F.
George W. Spurr T. M. U. 526 U. S. Field Artillery A. E. F.
John A. Collom S. S. U. 27 Sgt. 1st cl. Medical Dept. U. S. A.
J. Richard Eisenhart T. M. U. 155 Instructor Motor Transport - School, No. 1, A. E. F.
John Crosby Platt S. S. U. 14 American Tank Service Portland, Oregon.

-------------------

SECTION NOTES

Section 636 (old 70 and 18) took a special interest in its Fourth of July celebration, it being the anniversary of the landing in France of the old Field Service men of the section. The special event of the occasion was the decoration of four of the old men with the Croix de Guerre as follows: Sgt. 1 cl Walter J. Gores (formerly Sous-Chef of S. S. U. 70), Frederick Frick (second citation), George Hall and Kenneth Harvey. Following the decoration the section adjourned to a dining-room all dolled up in French and American flags and sat down to a sumptuous feed with beaucoup de champagne to wash it down. Lance Warren, who is on such intimate terms with Miss Liberty, was called upon for a little discourse on the ideals which said Miss Liberty is supposed to personify. Needless to tell readers of the Bulletin who saw Lance's letter to the young lady in question that the remarks were more witty and humorous than serious. Bob Donaldson, equally notorious to Bulletin readers, contributed a few un-appropriate remarks, among other things telling us that it spoke well for the "morale" of the section that we could celebrate the independence (we have not got in Uncle Sam's great army) of our glorious country on this festive occasion. Lieutenant Putnam, just returned to the section after being in Paris on sick leave, told its that Paris was no place to go to for recuperation --- that he felt worse on his return than when he left --- and forthwith turned over the worries of toastmaster to Sgt. 1 cl Gores and sank into quiet for the rest of the evening. Sgt. Jimmie Irwin being down at Aix on perm, the Irwin Stringed Quartette was most conspicuous by its absence. The Victor, however, did its darnedest to make up for it. All in all, though, everybody voted the affair the winner of all the previous crack celebrations of the section. The evening was wound up with speeches from the Croix de Guerre men, followed by a response from the Médecin-Divisionnaire the honor guest of the celebration. Lastly came the conventional singing of, the Marseillaise and the Star Spangled Banner.

Yours in the Service,

W. S. S. U., 636.

-------------------

FIELD SERVICE HOME LETTERS

The Editor of the future Field Service History, who occupies a neighboring desk in the sanctum along with the Editor of the Bulletin, is busy just now licking into shape a batch of home letters written by Field Service men. He frequently meets with good passages and often interrupts the Bulletin editor by reading them aloud. "I am especially struck by the find patriotism of these boys", he remarked to us the other day, and then gave us this example, "one among a hundred. " Here it is, dated last January and written by a member of Section 12:

"I see the U. S. is beginning to understand what it has to do in this war now. Well, dig in over there, and help us finish it as soon as possible. Every little bit helps, even indirectly. I will try to write Emmett, Dick and all the rest who will be over. Of course everybody will be here before the end. But the old U. S. must not falter in its stride now that the thing has started. The Germans are not super-men, as I take great pleasure in stating; they are quite capable of messing up things once in a while. So come on. "

-------------------

NOTES

Ralph M. Barrett, Dartmouth '18, (S. S. U. 12) has just passed through Paris on his way from a French hospital where he has been for two weeks suffering from an attack of scarlet fever. He is going to pass his convalescence at Chantilly.

-------------------

Samuel Whitney Hale (T. M. U. 397) has returned to the Ministry in the U. S. A.

-------------------

W. J. Bingham (S. S. U. 30 & 2) and J. R. Greenwood ( S. U. 8 --- Vosges Det.) have been promoted Captain U. S. A. A. S. Both men have been in charge of repair echelons of the U. S. A. A. S.

-------------------

The full page cartoon contributed to the Bulletin last March by Geo. Hall, and entitled "Will it come to this" was recently reproduced in a French trench paper, "La Fourragère", a paper conceived in the trenches of Verdun and Hill 304 ", and published by the 31st. Infantry. The cartoon was entitled, "Arrivons-nous a cela ?" and the sub-titles were explained in French.. "La Fourragère" publishes a column and contributions in English, "to tighten the bonds of friendship which already exist between the poilus and the Sammies in our sector. " Apparently the regiment has or has had an American ambulance section attached to it.

-------------------

Chester N. Shaffer, former volunteer in T. M. 397, and Henry Z Persons, formerly of T. M. 155 have been commissioned as second lieutenants in the Motor Transport service of the American Army. Second Lieutenant Shaffer is still stationed with the Mallet Reserve.

-------------------

Second Lieutenant Charles Judd Farley, formerly of S. S. U. 9 & 16, and later commandant of a transport section at Jouaignes, is busily shaking hands and receiving congratulations these hot July days. The hymeneal chant was sounded July 9, at St. Sewan, Ile-et-Vilaine, when Mlle Aimee de Mossoloff, became the bride of the Lieutenant in the hospital there where she is a Russian Red Cross nurse. They became acquainted in Passy two years ago at a reception at the home of Mlle de Mossoloff's uncle who is a general in the Russian army.

Mlle De Mossoloff had been seriously ill at the hospital when Lieutenant Farley obtained leave for a few days and the marriage rite took place in the hospital. Mlle de Mossoloff was decorated with the Cross of St. Catherine by the Russian government for her work in France with the Russian Red Cross. Lieutenant Farley enlisted in the American Army October 1, 1917 and was commissioned as Second lieutenant in December.

-------------------

First Class Sergeant J Richard Eisenhart, of Elmira, New York, (T. M. U. 155), formerly chief clerk in the Quarter Master Corps of the Motor Transport Service, has just passed through Paris on his way to Decize where he will act as instructor in the A. E. F. Transport School.

"Those of the Service who attended the Meaux School", he says, "may be interested to know that it was transferred in June. The American Ambulance men in Meaux at the time were given the job to tear down the barracks of the School, which were transported to M . . . . . . . .by French camions and French drivers, and then put up by the American ambulanciers and camion drivers.

-------------------

Sergeant Fred Kurth, detached for service with the Reserve Mallet, left his onerous duties there, which, he tells his comrades in arms repeatedly, keep him occupied the greater part of a 25 hour day, to go on a mission to a small faubourg of the Most Beautiful City in the World. That is, Fred said it was a mission. He hedged the mission in great secrecy. "Important documents!", came into his comrades minds as Fred looked most awesome and serious. He came home two days later, still secretive. But as Shakespeare says "Murder will out", and it has transpired that Fred's two day mission was to visit his marraine.

-------------------

LETTERS TO THE BULLETIN

First Lieutenant C. L. Jordan, formerly of the Camion Service (T. M. U. 133) and now of the Ordonnance Department, U. S. A., writes;

I like very much, even now, to live in the days of last spring and summer in the American Field Service, for I have never known such good friends or such worth while days. I am at present in the Ammunition Service and while the handling and study of the various kinds of high explosives is interesting and absorbing, I would swap it all for my old dirty, dusty five ton truck and a chance for more Section D. fun.

-------------------

Editor of Bulletin

As you have been so good as to lend the good service of your columns to try to accommodate the Old Philadelphia Lady, I think it should be brought to your attention that she is nothing but an old busybody. She is now writing to The Radiator in order to find out some thing or other. She is never civil enough to thank any of us for the time and trouble we have wasted trying to figure out how to tell one ambulance from another.

Pardon me if. I suggest that you discontinue allowing the readers of your paper to be made the goat of.

"Harvard Ex 1917."

-------------------

VISITORS AT 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

Eugene L. Sullivan (S. S. U. 8) Trans. Div. Air Service Production Centre n° 2 ; James W. D. Seymour (S. S. U. 17) 1st. Lieut. U. S. A. A. S.; Leroy L. Harding (S. S. U. 67) U. S. A. A. S.; Paul Niesley (S. S. U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Tom. O'Connor (S. S. U. 12) U. S. Naval Aviation ; J. L. Rothwell (T. M. U.526) U. S. Naval Aviation ; Joseph M. Graffis (T. M. U. 526) U. S. Naval Aviation; C. R. Kellogg (T. M. U. 184) Q. M. C. Paris ; L. C. Ames (S. S. U. 68) 2nd. Lieut. U. S. Air Service; George W. de Forest (S. S. U. 16) U. S. A. A. S. ; J. McMorrow (T. M. U. 133 )Aspirant Arcis-sur-Aube ; E. L. Egger (S. S. U. 13) 120 Regt. R. A. L. 6e. Groupe, Raymond K. Bontz (T. M. U. 133) U. S. Navy; Charles H. Grant (T. M. U. 133) U. S. Air Service ; Joel Harris Newell (S. S. U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; John W. Ames Jr. (S. S. U. 2) Aspirant 11e Regt. d'Artillerie de Campagne; Harold G. Meissner (S. S. U. 16) U. S A. A. S.; Samuel Friedman (S. S. U. 16) U. S. A. A. S.; Benj. F. Butler, Jr. (S. S. U. 65) U. S. A. A. S.; Leland S. Thompson (S. S. U. 26) U S. A. A. S. ; Robert McDougall (S. S. U. 30) 1st. Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; Luke C. Doyle (S. S. U. 3) Captain, 1st. Division U. S. A.; Arthur Dallin (S. S. U. 1) French Artillery, Trench Mortars ; Robert J. Burroughs (S. S. U. 12) U. S. A. A. S. ; James M. Parmalee (S. S. U. 27) Eleve Aspirant at Fontainebleau ; Davis Garratt (S. S. U. 66) Eleve Aspirant at Fontainebleau ; John S. McCampbell (S. S. U. 69) Eleve Aspirant at Fontainebleau ; Rowland Dodson (T. M. U. 184) Eleve Aspirant at Fontainebleau ; Homer Gage (S. S. U. 31) U. S. A. A. S.

-------------------

NOTES

S. S. U. 621/68 defeated S. S. U. 625/1 on June 30th by a score of 9 to 7. The hitting of Kingman and Wylie and the all around work of McCague featured. Lieutenant Eno of 622 formerly of Section 1 umpired. No fatalities are reported.

K. A. W.

 

Among the members of the American Red Cross who have been awarded the Italian War Cross were the following old Field Service men:

J. H. Tedford (T. M. U. 133), Raymond T. Hanks (T. M. U. 133), Willard H. Hohl (T. M. U. 184), Malcolm G. Olson (T. M. U. 184), Robert Rieser (S. S. U. 33).

Kenneth L. Austin (S. S. U. & 8) a corporal in Field Artillery has been sent to the Officers Field Artillery School.

 

LETTER TO THE BULLETIN

Merci de m'envoyer votre Bulletin qui me rappelle ceux que j'ai connus et si grandement estimés. Je veux être de vos abonnés. Voici pour les six mois presents. Dans six mois, rappelez-moi à l'ordre pour que je paye mon abonnement.

Veuillez croire à tout mon respect et à ma sincère admiration pour vos vaillants automobilistes.

F. CLERET DE LANGAVANT,
Anc. Aumônier, 65 division et S. S. U. 2 et 19.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

UN PEU DE FRANCE --- MEUSE 1917

Came discord, of a day and Iron Wrath
Strewing Destruction vast along its path
Loud-voicéd, lewd and strong with lewd intent,
A man-made earthquake by a mad-man willed
And shattered all my Vale of Peace and Killed
Our flowers --- and still the lustful winds lament!

There was a Vale of Peace I knew and there
Where lustful breezes paid a dangerous court
To flowered beauties and kindred sort,
Where poppies bent their flaming heads and rare
Crocii seduced those wingéd loves who dare
Adore their beauty, --- did sweet dreams abound.
I've dreamed away some idle hours and found
The Peace Dame Nature predicated there.

E. M. ---S. S. U. 2

-------------------

                     TO S. L. C.

In that dim land to which you turned so soon
Too soon! --- it may be that you now can see
The destiny that shapes our little days
And fills them with the present misery;
And with your larger vision know at last
Why youth must give up youth itself and give
Even its life --- that the ideals of youth
May thus be cherished and forever live.

J. B. C. 17/635.

-------------------

 

     BEFORE THE BATTLE

Sometimes in the hush of the bivouac,
Sweet visions of home return,
As I watch on guard, 'cross the battle-scarred
Slope, where the star shells burn,
And the old familiar faces
Are framed in the faint star-glow
And the sweet perfume, the shadows, the moon,
Are dreams, but they're real I know.

And as darkness deepens around
My sleep laden eyes can see
Through vistas of yore, my home once more,
Where they're waiting and praying for me
And a voice, 'tis mother speaking,
So near, and it's soft and low.
And it seems to me I'm a child again
In the dim of the long ago.
And the gun that slants from my shoulder,
Seems her arm in a soft caress.
And I reach for her hand, --- you understand,
We attack in the morning, I guess. -

David DARRAH,
Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

THE AISNE BATTLE
(Newspaper clipping Americans are fighting
side by side with the French near Château-Thierry.)

The sky was seared with fire,
With blood the ground ran wet,
I saw the shattered ranks retire
I wept for France, her hour most dire,
Her star seemed set!

So thought I in my dread
Until my dimmed eyes met
Above her serried ranks of dead,
A screaming Eagle o'er whose head,
The star's resplendent yet!

David DARRAH,
Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

FRAGMENT
OF THE COMEDY OF NIGHTS AND DAYS

DEATH

A thin, nervous old man whose lace is lined with care and who bears unmistakable signs of dissipation.

FATE :

Wife of Death, who stands a little in awe of her. She is a large, generously formed woman with a habit of standing with her arms crossed, the while she tirades in a rasping, irritating voice.

HOPE:

Eldest child of the two, who has no affection for her father. She is shabbily dressed and bears marks of recent ill-treatment.

DESPAIR

An over-grown infant.

SATAN

Himself.

An ethereal sitting room, where Death and his family gather for occasional moments of leisure. Death is dressed in showy finery, but his clothes are awry and hear the marks of constant usage. Fate, in a faded house-dress, is confronting him. Hope is playing in the corner with some stars her father has brought her from the Milky Way. The baby is sleeping in a cradle by the window.

FATE:

Drunk! Always drunk...
Your breath is heavy with the fumes of youth
Your mouth is stained with rich, red blood
Your eyes are bleary and your step, is weak .....

DEATH

For pity, woman! Can you never speak,
Never open your mouth but that a flood
Of bitterness bursts forth ? Well, for the truth,
What matters it if I am drunk?
Time was, I know --- but that is past---
When I could take my daily toll of men
In moderation. I could pick at will
(With you to help me as I made the choice)
From old and young alike --- but that is past.
Times now are changed upon the earth, and when
I seek my dainties, and a mod'rate fill
Of warm young blood that makes my heart rejoice,
I find such quantities of youthful dead
Full of the wine I love, and clear and sweet,
That I must need consume it all. I ask
Is it a wonder that I lose my head
And drink and drink, until my careful feet
Grow mad with rapture for their daily task
And tread unheeding over countless lives?
I pay the price for all the foolish waste
My dreams are nightmares and my nerves are drawn
Like a tight band around my sick'ning heart.
My will is powerless, although it strives
To curb the passion of my sinister taste
For I, alas! am but a feeble pawn.
And when the prompter calls, I play my part.

FATE

Yes, play the part of some poor, spineless fool!
If you are honest in the wish to be
Once more the faithful husband that you were,
And bring again those happy days of yore,
Recall, and live up to, your, former rule
To be most careful of your company.
Since you have gone with that --- I call him cur!

Upon whom you would never look before,
You have gone willingly down evil ways,
Forgetting even decency to do
The evil things he urges. Look at Hope---
Her clothes are rags and tatters. When she plays
With her bright-faced companion, Memory,
Who dresses in soft clothes of every hue,
I grow ashamed.

                            Ah, no --- I cannot cope
With all the sorrow of these evil hours.
Come! Lethe. Can you not recall the time
When you and I were young, eye Hope was born,
That we made happy love among the flowers
And you would woo me with impassioned rhyme ? ...
Now even Hope, our child, is left forlorn!

DEATH (impatiently)

Yes, yes, I know. A drunkard's pain is mine.
Here in the quiet of my wretched home
I long for all the peace that used to be,
And blush for shame because my weakness leads
To a too-willing thirst for th' fair wine---
Ah, well, I'll drown my sorrow in the foam
Of effervescent youth.

                                   It seems to me
That modern thought has now outgrown the creeds
By which we moved in ages long gone by.
With my good friend --- whom surely you admire
For all his wisdom and his wealth and pow'r
I'll spend my time in that which pleases most
There, there! I had no wish to make you cry
But I am thirsty and my brain's afire,
For it is more than past my dunking hour.

FATE

Ah, shame upon you, Lethe, that you boast
Of your foul friend, or dare to say that I
Should look upon him as an envied thing
I doubt his wisdom and I scorn his wealth
And hate his power over you,

                                            To think
That once in those fair times so long gone by
Eternal Life once offered me his ring!
I might be his wife now but for the stealth
With which you lured me from the golden brink
Of all the happiness he promised me.
In the beginning of all time he seemed
So poor a figure that I heeded you,
Who were a tower of security
And all my poor and girlish heart had dreamed---
And now the woman finds the dream untrue.

Enter SATAN, his eyes twinkling over the mischief he has caused. Death, looking doubtfully at his wife, goes forward to greet the visitor. Hope throws her stars, in a passion, out of the window and leaves the room. Fate who to her horror is secretly in love with the devil, but who refuses to acknowledge her passion even to herself --- coldly greets the visitor and walks over to the window, looking out toward the world.

SATAN

Come, Death, there is a merry feast that waits
For you and I --- your wife, too, if she will.

FATE: (With heat)

No, thank you. I will stay at home and pray
That Lethe may grow weary of the friend
Who takes him always through the swinging gates
              Of some low brothel. -

SATAN : (Laughing)

              We will drink our fill!
Come, Death, 'tis late, so let us on our way.

Exit Death and Satan, arm in arm.

FATE (half to herself)

Oh, God, I ask you, will it never end?

Fate throws herself into a chair by the table and buries her face in her arms, her body shaking with sobs. Despair awaken and begins to cry fretfully.

CURTAIN.

J. B. C., 635/17.

-------------------

ODDS AND ENDS

James W D. Seymour, one of the few original Seventeen men that were left to 635, is no longer a sergeant, nor is he connected with the section. In fact, it is considered rather a social error to address Jim other than as First Lieutenant James W. D. Seymour, USAAS. The section rejoiced that Jim's ability had been fittingly recognized by the powers that be, but his departure has left a vacancy none other will be able to fill.

Lieut. Basil Knight Neftel recently received a letter from the Medecin Divisionnaire of a division to which the section was attached but a few days. The letter was an official ordre, 23, of the division, commending both Lieut. Neftel and the section for the work done with the division (which was in the lines at the time) and regretting that the section had not remained with that division. At present the section again is attached to the division with which it has worked since its formation.

John Dewitt Toll, Jr., of New-York, Philadelphia and Hot Springs, recently broke an unique record. He wrote a letter which had the distinction of being the first letter he has written to any girl since he reached France, more than a year ago.

Flapjack Tellier and Al Gandy, who reign supreme in the kitchen, have fallen out, and no longer are on speaking terms. The result is highly satisfactory to the section, for the question that started the rumpus is whether Jack is a better cook than Al, or vice versa. Of course the section is the judge, but to date it has withheld final opinion pending the introduction of new evidence that has just been discovered. In the meantime, the battle rages. If Tellier dishes up Flapjacks --- hence his name --- for breakfast, Gandy deftly parries the advantage with a mess of crullers, so delicious that just the thought of them makes the teeth float. Puddings fly --- down throats --- and the section menu boast hitherto unheard of dainties.

Eddie Gheer, who likes to mess around the insides of a Ford engine is happy at last. For weeks he has been spending his money on fishing tackle and queer looking artificial bugs and things, with never a stop close to any water except that in a pump. Now the section resides not fat from the banks of a canal, and all of Eddie's spare minutes are spent very happily. That there are no fish in the canal and therefore he never yet has had one nibble does not seem to matter in the least with Eddie, who is in the advanced stage of Isaac Waltonitis.

It is in the same canal that Slats Harvey, the demon diver of the section, has been hanging up new aquarian records. Slats --- as his name indicates - has the slim and graceful lines of an elephant, and when he hurtles himself into the canal little French children run to their homes screaming : "The Dam Has Burst!" Three times the spring board erected by the section has been discouraged and quit when Slats balanced himself on the end and prepared to leap, so that now it is défendu for Harv. This swimming, by the way, is rare stuff. The morning class is not so well attended, but about three-thirty of any sunshiny afternoon Frenchmen who are at leisure can be seen collecting on the bridge that overlooks the spot where some thirty boys who refuse to grow up are having swimming hole games again. Bunk Bridget, speed-artist de luxe, is the leader of the evening class, to which some half-dozen subscribe.

Bunk Bridget, you know, is the same Bunk who cannot understand why it is that Frenchmen give him a blank look when he earnestly asks

"Avez-voo a match, s'il voo please?"

And Al Gandy says that all cooks should receive the D. S. C.

They do their best work when the fire is hottest.

S. S. U. 17

-------------------

CIGARETTES

When I walk along the street, looking for some friend to greet, eye-ing sign's to find the nearest bar, in, a soldat edges near, and lie says in français dear, "Cigarette? ", while watching my cigar.

Then I offer him my box while he mercis me a lot. -- « Pas tabac en France, de tout, de tout », says he. « C'est la guerre. » I then reply (all my French, but that gets by) for he grins and answers. « Oui, c'est ça », to me.

Later when I'm safely planted in some buvette nook enchanted, sipping vin blanc, grenadine or Meuse beer, musing at the wondrous fragrance, of my "fag" or at the vagrance of my ways, or how much longer I'll be here, someone gently taps my shoulder, and I see a français soldier, standing by me with his face all wreathed in smiles. Not a word he says (well knows he I have cigarettes) he shows me his empty box, --- in him there is no guile.

And in darkness as I amble homeward in my drivers shamble, ere I reach my bunk I make a little bet, some benighted slave of tabac, lies in ambush, me to attack, with the smiling outworn query a « Cigarette ».

David DARRAH, Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Roy D. Lamond S.S.U. 69 Yeoman U. S. Naval Aviation.
Charles Henry Fiske S.S.U. 3 2nd Lieut. N. A.
Graeme Gardiner Whytlaw S.S.U. 2 Cadet Aviator, Royal Flying Corps.
Sidney Colford S.S.U. 13 Sgt. Interpreter U. S. Marines American 2nd Division.
Edward Howland Parry S.S.U. 66 Pvt. Aviation Sect. Signal Corps, U.S.A.
Edward Lyman Bill S.S.U. 4 Eleve Aspirant, 52e Brigade, Ecole Militaire, Fontainebleau.
Frank H. Boyd S.S.U. 18 Cadet Aviation U. S. School of Military Aeronautics, Ohio State University.
Ogden Bond Douglass T.M.U. 242 Sgt. U. S. Tank Corps Camp Colt, Gettysburg, Pa.
Robert Hill Bolling S.S.U. 12 Pvt. U. S. Signal Corps Flying Squadron, U. S. Military School.
Warren T. Kent T.M.U. 251 1st Lieut. A. S. S. R. C. A. E. F.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

ERNEST-ARMAND GIROUX

Ernest Armand Giroux, Lieutenant in U. S. Air Service was killed in action May 21st, 1918. Giroux was in the Camion branch, T. M. U. 526, of the American Field Service from May until August, 1917, when he was released to go into Aviation. Giroux was a Dartmouth man, and his home was in Worcester, Massachusetts.

-------------------

WARREN TUCKER HOBBS

Word has been received that Warren Tucker Hobbs, Lieutenant in U. S. Air Service has also been killed in action. Hobbs joined the Field Service in April, 1917, and was a member of T. M. U. 526 until August when he joined the U. S. Aviation Service. He was a Dartmouth man, and his home was in Somerville, Massachusetts.

-------------------

FROM A PRIVATE IN THE FOREIGN LEGION

The Editor of the Bulletin has received these gallant lines from James A. Gamman, formerly of Section 13

1 regret I did not drop in my old headquarters while on my recent furlough in Paris before leaving for the front, and you certainly know what "front" means to a member of the Foreign Legion. I fear my part so far in the war is a very small one, although I left New York last March determined to try and catch up with some of my friends who had gone over the top, etc. Earlier in the war I spent a few months in Section 13 with some of the best pals I have ever known and I believe the break up of the old Ambulance Service, seemed a bit harder for us than for some sections, for we were all good friends and worked together. Deaths in my family called me home last fall and when I returned to France I signed with the Foreign Legion, through the kindness of comrades, officers in America of the French army, just as soon as my private affairs permitted. I spent a glorious month in Paris with old friends of the Ambulance and new friends of the Legion, who, out of affection for me, spent much of their time in advising me against going to the front with the Legion. However, on May 13th, I left for the Legion depot at Lyons and since then have learned in a small way to be a Légionnaire. I leave for the front tomorrow and then I am sure I shall know better how to act my part. So far I have heard of no former members of the Field Service being in the Legion, although a few Americans are left. You know the casualties in the regiment have been very great of late and I fear many have "gone West". However, I know several American chaps who served for three years in the Legion, but who have now changed to our army. I still say "our" army and I trust I shall always say so.

It is needless for me to speak of my admiration for our allies, the French. My joining the Legion today speaks for itself on this score. My desire on leaving home was to be sure of reaching the trenches, feeling the adventure was an experience I could not be quite happy without trying also. I would not like, après la guerre, to meet my friends who had been there while I had not. Knowing the Legion, I came, and never, never shall I regret doing so. I am with real men, every one, some liking it while others do not. But these days a man does not come to the Legion unless he has desire to help in a big way. I have learned that a Légionnaire gives his life willingly for France or for a pal, and you will grant me, I am sure, that these are men one can feel quite sure of when the order is : "En avant, Légion Etrangère !" By the way, a story going the rounds in Paris is that an American asked if it was necessary in the Legion to speak French. "No", the reply was ; only four words of French are necessary, --- " En avant, Légion Etrangère !"

I am very proud to be a Légionnaire and I trust that I may do my bit at the front with those who know the game much better than I do. However, I trust my best friends will not come, too, simply because I say it is a wonderful experience quite worth while and that a good Légionnaire has no regrets.

-------------------

VISITORS AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

Kenneth Le Roy Austin (S..S.U. 4 et 8) Cpl. 2nd. F. A. Brigade, Laurence C. Ames (S.S.U. 68) 2nd Lieut. U. S. Air Service; R. Randolph Ball (S.S.U. 69) 61st Brigade, Fontainebleau ; Ralph N. Barrett (S.S.U. 12) U. S. A. A. S. ; John H. Boyd (Hdqts) and Lieut. Trans. Branch of Aviation; Robert L. Buell (S.S.U. 15) Eleve Aspirant, Fontainebleau; Linford E. Brown (T.M.U. 3) American Express Co; John Craig (S.S.U. 2) Fontainebleau ; W. Crane (S.S.U. 4) 2nd Lieut. U. S. Infantry; George Dock (S.S.U. 2) French Aviation; A. Dudgeon (S.S.U. 14) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; Jack Nevin (Hdqts.) French Artillery; C. J. Farley (T.M.U. .242) 2nd Lieut. Q. M. R. C. Instruction T. M. C. School No 1; Powel Fenton (S.S.U. 3) 1st U.. S. Air Service; Philip Frost (S.S.U. 28) Cas. Det. Hdqrs. U. S. A. A. S. ; E. Mack Gildea (T.M.U. 133) Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau; Robert B. Hyman (T.M.U. 242) Eleve de l'Ecole Polytechnique, Fontainebleau ; John R. Houghton (S.S.U. 16) 2nd Lieut. U. S. Air Service ; H. W. Hailey (T.M.U. 537) U. S. Air Service, James C. Hobart, Jr. (T.M.U. 397) American Express Co, Jacob A. Emery (T.M.U. 526) 1st Lieut. Instructor Camp Decize ; F. G. Hartswick (Res. Mallet) Pvt. M. T. C. School No 1; William W. McCarthy (S.S.U. 17) U. S. A. A. S.; J. Milton Nazel (S.S.U. ,17) U. S. A A. S. ; James Palmer (S.S.U. 17) U. S. A. A. S. ; Charles Wayne Walton (S.S.U. 17) U. S. A. A. S. ; A. Edward MacDougall (S.S.U. 30) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; Powel Robinson (S.S.U. 15) U. S. A. A. S.; Jack B. Smith (S.S.U. 26) 2nd Lieut. A. S. S. Corps R. C. Air Service ; Frederick L. Sexton (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A.A. S.; C. N. Shaffer (T.M.U. 397) 2nd Lieut. American Mission, Mallet Reserve; N. H. Reynolds (T.M.U. 537) Hdqrs. U. S. A. A. S. ; Frank J. Taylor (S.S.U. 10) United Press Correspondent ; William C. Sanger, Jr. (S.S.U. 9) 1st Lieut. Asst. Military Attaché, American Embassy; George Y. Young (Boston Office) Lieut. U. S. Air Service, A. E. F. ; F. V. V. Wethey (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; L. R. Wilson (T.M..U 133) 2nd Lieut. U. S. Air Service.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

MORE ABOUT BOOKS

In pursuance of the suggestion made in the contributed editorial in our number of July 28, Major Andrew has arranged with the American Library Association, 10, rue de l'Elysée, to send to each of the ambulance sections serving with the French army a selection of books for the use of the men in these sections. Mr. Burton Stevenson, the American representative of the A. L. A. whose headquarters are .at the above address, states that a large collection of books is arriving in France and that the books sent to the sections can be exchanged from time to time at their headquarters. He will also send to the officers commanding the sections request slips by means of which applications can be made for particular books which, so far as possible, will be procured and sent in exchange for books returned from the sections' collections. It is suggested that old Field Service men in the T. M. Service, or in any other formations of the American or French army, who desire to be supplied with books, direct their requests to the Field Service headquarters from which they will be transmitted to the American Library Association with appropriate recommendations.

-------------------

                                SONG

There is music where the evening breezes kiss the clover bed,
There is music where the breezes brush the blossoms overhead,
And my heart is filled with music, filled with love---though love is dead
Like some dusty sheet of music that is left unsung, unread.

There is rapture in the shading of the distant skies of night
And the stars are scorched with passion, 'til they glisten clear and white
Now my eyes reflect the splendor of your own eyes' purest light
In a flood of recollection, while I tingle with delight.

There is perfume in the gardens, that I find so dark and drear,
That is wafted as the incense from some flower-covered bier
Yet the odors of an autumn night soon fade and disappear,
Like the blossom of the rose that droops and lies abandoned here.

For the air is overburdened with a sorrow heaven-born
Mid the dew drops are the tear drops of a dream that is outworn;
All your beauty gives a longing that but leaves me more forlorn ----
And I turn away from dreaming, and I hunger for the morn'.

J. B. C., 635/17.

-------------------

              IF EVER TIME

If ever time should overtake my youth
And rob me prematurely of the zest
Of life's unending searching after truth
I know surcease of life for me were best.
If ever sloth and ease should bring content
And I should shun in plaintiveness and fear
Life's dismal objects, --- then would life be spent;
The shuddering summons I should hope to hear,
For though I squandered many a golden day
In revelry and riot unrestrained
Yet what were youth forever in the gray
Of aims though undefeated unattained.
May Death soon end my erring search for truth
If ever time should overtake my youth.

David DARRAH, Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

SAFETY IN ABBREVIATIONS

What's in a name ? Nothing perhaps, --- and the rose would smell as sweet. However, in the Reserve Mallet an address is significant. A certain camion sergeant, during the last offensive, ordered a gun crew who were blocking the road to get out of the way and in the dark unknowingly addressed harsh words to an American officer. That's all there is to that story. If you want to know how he "got that way", read on.

The sergeant on the first camion was hurrying home to add a few hours to his night's repose by his. haste in getting there. Out of the blackness ahead of him suddenly there loomed a huge field gun and men around it trying to induce it to move on, with but indifferent success.

"Get the hell out of the way", yelled the sergeant.

"Whuzzat, Whuzzat ", spluttered a voice.

"Get the hell out of the way", repeated the sergeant.

"Who are you", said the voice, "do you know you are talking to a Captain in the American army?"

"No sir, I did not recognize you", said the Sergeant.

"I had better see that you do the next time, what's your outfit", the voice asked.

"Provisional company B, Groupe Browning, Groupement Langlois, American Mission, M. T. D. A. E. F. Reserve Mallet, Convois Autos, Par B. C. M., Paris, sir."

"Aw, go to hell ", said the Captain.

D. D., Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

              YES, ONLY IF!

If I were general in this blooming war
Instead of private (of the second class)
I'd run things as they'd never gone before
And lots of changes sure would come to pass.

I'd call my men and say "Now, look here, gents,
I know darned well you're just as good as me
So cut salutes and "Sirs", there aint no sense
In that stuff when the scrap's for liberty."

When pay day came --- and I'd be sure it did,
I'd lead the gang right for the nearest town,
And tell 'em "Scouts, we're going to raise the lid
And its some man that tries to drink me down."

And if a man could sing a clever song
Or tell a yarn, or act a little skit
A quick promotion'd follow. There's no wrong
In paying talent when it does its bit.

With me permission times would be no fakes,
I'd pile the whole darn league upon the cars
And though we might not take the cure at Aix
We'd need it, after all the Paris bars,.

But this is futile, for I plainly see,
Unless queer notions rule my Colonel's brow
That no promotion 'er could come to me
As long as things are run as they're run, now,

B W., S. S. U. 18.

-------------------

 

TRANSFERS

Many a conducteur de camion, be he of the première or the deuzieme class, it matters not which, wants a transfer. Some want transfers to the infantry, some want transfers to the artillery; there are others who would be transferred to the tanks, and still others who seek admittance to aviation, and some there be who just want to be transferred, --- no matter where.

Disporting along one of the traffic crowded roads during the last offensive were several of these genus homos. Their convoy was momentarily held up and they were exchanging compliments with each other and appraising the army and; their unsung records in it.

Past them dashes a huge touring car and in it is one of those exalted personages who comprise the difference between the bonanza A. F. S. days and the present. On his shoulders were silver eagles, and he was dashing to the front.

One of the conducteurs snapped to a salute. The others merely looked hostile. The big car made raucous noises as its driver suddenly threw on the brakes and stopped it. Out stepped the man with the eagles on his shoulders.

Sternly he eyes the conducteurs who by this time decided to accord him the honors of his rank.

"Why did you not salute me" he asked the first conducteur, and he received reply, "I did, sir."

"Why did you not salute me," he said to the next man.

"I did not think it was necessary", said the culprit.

"And you, and you and you?," he asked on down the line.

"Well after this I want you to salute me and every officer you see, or," he glared at them, "I'll put you in the infantry."

Instead of blanching with terror, the face of every conducteur de camion began to glow with animation.

"Say, c'n y'u fix it up, colonel," piped a unanimous chorus in undisguised eagerness, we've been trying to transfer to the infantry for six months".

"Well how'd you like to be in the tanks, then," improvised the Colonel, resourceless, discomfitted, and defeated.

D. D., Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

         LE MISÉRABLE

Oh, when I joined the Ambulance
A gallant youth was I.
The poilus gazed, as in a trance
When fleet my Ford rushed by.
But now --- but now --- Ah, woe is me,
The glamour swift has flown
A private I --- an or'nery guy,
Ah, listen to my moan.

When I was in The Ambulance
It was a guerre de luxe,
The German thought not to advance,
My pals were comtes and ducs.
But now I brave the battle front
And hear the cannon roar,
My pay is thirty bucks a month,
The ducs I know no more.

Oh, when I joined The Ambulance
My uniform was slick
And now the Army gives me pants --
They fit me very quick.
But I shall see the Awful Hun
When hard will be his lot.
My car's been hit, I do my bit ---
Fond mem'ries be forgot!

W. P. C., S. S. U. 635 (old 17).

-------------------

 

NOTES

We have received information to the effect that Cornelius Winant, who was reported killed last month while serving as aspirant in a French artillery regiment, has written to his brother Gilbert that he is a prisoner of war, and well. No camp address is given, and the card is dated July 4th

-------------------

Pvt. 1st Class Frederick Lockwood S. S. U. 621, (old 68), was reported missing when an advanced dressing station fell into the hands of the enemy. Word has been received that one of the others with him at the time and also reported missing has been located at Limburg, Germany, and it is believed that Lockwood is also there.

-------------------

Pvt. 1st Class William J. Wright of S. S. U. 42 (old 30) has been reported through the Red Cross as being prisoner of war at a prison camp at Darmstadt, Germany. It is believed probable that Pvt. 1st Class Don C. Murphy, a member of the same section and reported missing at the same time, may be located in the Darmstadt camp. -

-------------------

Through the Red Cross at Berne, Switzerland, Americans located in German prison camps are sent a twenty pound package of food, and delicacies every week. The assortment is varied every week for a period of a month. A war prisoner's package contains about twenty-four separate necessities, including corned beef, roast beef, salmon, tomatoes, hard bread, rice, evaporated milk, butter, sugar, coffee, cocoa, jam, prunes, raisins, figs, salt, pepper, vinegar, chocolate, candy, soap and cigarettes.

In addition to the above, the Red Cross sends each American detained in an enemy camp sets of pyjamas and changes of underclothing. In its work among the war prisoners the organization is backed by the United States, which has officially designated the Red Cross to carry on this work.

-------------------

1st Lt. Sumner Sewall, A. S. Sig. R. C. (S. S. U. 8) is entered as a claimant for a portion of the prize offered by Mr. Curtis Tilton, to be divided among the first five American aviators to bring down three German planes.

Summer Sewall, of the --- Aero Squadron, has been engaged in the following mentioned combats with the enemy, the results of which have been officially confirmed by the French and American military authorities:

(a) On June 3rd, 1918, he engaged six enemy planes in combat, north of Ménil-la-Tour. Forcing one from the formation, after a spirited engagement, lasting for ten minutes, the enemy plane burst into flames and crashed to the ground near Dieulouard. (Confirmed in Operations Report, Hq. --- th Division, June 3, '18.

(b) On July 10, 1918, Lieutenant Sewall encountered two German planes, in the vicinity of Giezaney. By skilfully manœuvring he brought down one of the Germans after a fight lasting twenty minutes, in which he received a bullet in the tank and motor of his own plane. (Confirmed in Operations Report. Hq. --- st Pursuit Group, July 31-18.)

(c) On July 26, 1918, Lieutenant Sewall encountered an enemy biplace Rumpler, near Villeneuve-sur-Fère, about 7 a. m., which he forced to land in flames after a short combat. (Confirmed in Operations Report, .Hq. Air Service. --- Army, July 28-18.)

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

SCHUYLER LEE

Word has been received that Schuyler Lee was killed in action in April, 1918. Lee joined the Field Service in April, 1917, going out with the Camion Branch and was in T. M. U. 526. He left the Service in August to go into French Aviation. Lee was 19 years old, a student of Andover Academy and his home was in New London, Conn.

-------------------

CLAYTON CAREY ELLIS

Clayton Carey Ellis (S: S. U. 28) was killed on August 7th, by a shell while serving in S. S. U. 640. Ellis joined the American Field Service on May 5th, 1917 and was sent out with Section 28 in June. He enlisted in the U. S. Army September 17th, 1917. Ellis was 22 years old, a student at Dartmouth College and his home was in Boston.

-------------------

BOOKS, TOBACCO and BASEBALL

We have just received from Lieutenant William J. Losh, S.S.U. 583, a letter from which we give the following extracts:

"I should now like to reopen negociations for the tobacco which you generously offered us, and also for the box of books which you spoke of as being a possibility. We are in a sad need of both as the American troops, our erstwhile source of supply, have left. As for books, so long is it that anyone has had anything stimulating to read, that we have degenerated into intellectual animals. I realize that it is an imposition on you to ask for these things especially as I am the only Field Service man with the outfit, but the need is so crying that I have lost all sense of moral obligation.

"My section, 583, took on the baseball team of S.S.U. 622 (old 65), of which Sponagle, an old timer of Section 1 and later 6, is chef, and in spite of the German balloons, who were so interested in the proceedings that they forgot to direct fire on us, we walked off with the game, 12 to 10. It was often rather difficult to find the ball in the infield on account of the wheat, but it was a good old game anyway."

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN.

George Lyman S.S.U. 9 2nd Lieut. U. S. Infantry 101st Div.
Paul Holmes Gray T.M.U. 184 Sgt. Quarter Master Corps American E. F. A. P. O. 716.
Davis Perdriaux Kelly.   Pvt. Battery F --10th Field Artillery, American E. F.
W. Agar S.S.U. 16 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service.
W. Orr S.S.U. 12 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service,
A. McLane S.S.U. 12 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service.
G. Richardson S.S.U. 1 Capt U. S. R. Cavalry.
F. Gailor S.S.U. 2 1st. Lieut. U. S. Artillery.
P. Cate S.S.U. 3 Ensign U. S. Navy.
Howland W. Bottomley T.M.U. 184 Civil Service. Gov't Wool Valuer Q. M. C. U. S. A.
George R. Young (Boston Office). 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service.

-------------------

VISITORS AT 21 RUE RAYNOU4BD

William I. Honens (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S. ; David Van Alstyne, Jr. (S.S.U. 15) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. A. G. Carey (S.S.U. 3) 2nd Lieut. U. S. F. A. ; Powel Fenton (S.S.U. 3) 1st Lieut. U. S. Air, Service; F. D. Ogilvie (S.S.U. 2) S. S. A. 18; E. A. Weeks (S.S.U. 32) U. S. A. A. S.; H. M. Hamilton (S.S.U. 69) Elève Aspirant Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; E. R. Kellogg (T.M.U. 184) Q. M. C. Paris. ; Brooke Edwards (S.S.U. 1) U. S. Air Service ; John S. Woodbridge (S.S.U. 66) (U. S. A. A. S. ; Carl W. Vail (S.S.U. 19) U. S. A. A. S. ; Robert Whitney (S. S. U. 68) 1st Lieut. Air Service ; Ralph Neylon Barrett (S.S.U. 12) U. S. A. A. S. ; August A. Rubel (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S. ; Joel H. Newell (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S. ; Travis P. Lane (T.M.U. 133) Aspirant French Artillery ; E. C. Beall (T.M.U. 133) French Artillery ; Paul D, Woodman (T.M.U. 526) Reserve Mallet ; B. P. Eldred (S. S. U. 66) Ecole Militaire, Fontainebleau ; William D. Crane (S.S.U. 4) 165th Infantry Co. K; O. B. Salinger (S.S.U. 32) U. S. A. A. S. ; W. G. Rice, Jr. (S.S.U. 66) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; R. R. Ball (S.S.U. 69) 61st Brigade, Fontaineblean ; John H. Boyd (Hdqs.) 2nd Lieut. Trans. Branch of Aviation; Robert L. Buell (S.S.U. 15) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; E. Mack Gildea (T.M.U. 133) Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; C. N. Shaffer (T.M.U. 397) 2nd Lieut. American Mission, Mallet Reserve ; John W. Ames, Jr. (S.S.U. 2), Aspirant 11e Regt. d'Artillerie de Campagne ; James M. Parmalee (S.S.U. 27) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; David L. Garratt (S.S.U. 66) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; John S. McCampbell (S.S.U. 69) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; N. H. Reynolds (T.M.U. 397) Hdqs. U. S. A. A. S. ; M. H. Roblee (T.M.U. 526) Elève Aspirant ; Harry B. Harter (S.S.U. 70) Elève Aspirant; William J. Bingham (S.S.U. 2) Capt. U. S. A. A. S. Robert J. W. Moss (Parc) American Red Cross ; T. L. Preble (T.M.U. 397) 2nd Lieut. Hdqrs. M. T. Corps ; F. J. Wakem (T.M.U. 133) 2nd Lieut. Reserve Mallet ; Lawrence J. Moran (S.S.U. .32) Hdqrs. U. S. A. A. S. ; Johnston G. Craig (T.M.U. 133) Batt. C. 6th F. A. Frederick E. Wallace (T.M.U. 133) 1st Lieut. U. S. A, A. S. ; Cyrus C. Clark (T.M.U. 133) M. T. S. A. P. O. 705 ; J. W. Storrs (T.M.U. 526) 2nd Lieut. Base Sect. 4.

-------------------

THE FIELD SERVICE HISTORY

In the appendix of the future History of the Field Service will be found a Bibliography composed of the titles of books and articles in periodicals bearing on the Field Service. The Editor of the History will he glad to have his attention called to any such books or articles.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

           SPIRIT OF FRANCE

Spirit of France, immortal, hail to thee!
Symbol of hope throughout these darkened years
When tyranny and might on land and sea
           Bring pain and tears.

Thou and thy valiant allies, bronzed and brave,
Battle unceasingly against the foe,
Forward across the land and on the wave
           Thy legions go.

.

Forward, and hark the magic of each name
That leads thine armies in the great world war
The Marne, Verdun and Reims --- eternal fame
           For evermore.

Spirit of France, give ever to the world
The faith and sunshine of thy joyous heart
Wherever freedom's flag shall be unfurled
           Thy strength impart:

Strength in the hour of trial and of pain
Bravely to bear the agony and night
Trusting that dawn will bring to all again
           Its glorious light.

France
August 4, 1918.

Wm. Cary SANGER Jr.,
1st Lieut. Inf. R. C.
(Formerly S. S. U. 9)

-------------------

NO MAN'S LAND

The grey clay stares to heaven's blue
     The wistful aspect shown.
With shattered branches, trees stare, too,
     While sin and sorrow is sown.

Of Laughing Life is not a sign
     All seems in sadness blent
The trailing wires theirselves entwine
     The ground is torn and rent.

Each while with screams there comes a shell
     To stir the hallowed ground
Where, of a night, the Heroes fell
     Where divers deaths abound

‘Tis felt, this stern and ruthless hand
     That grasps and crushes all.
Its clutch is felt in No Man's Land
     Where Heroes fell --- and fall.

E. M., S. S. U. 2.

-------------------

APOLOGIA

The editor's humblest apology is due to R. A. Donaldson, S.S.U. 636 (old 18) to whom credit was not given for the two fine poems "For France Today" in No. 51, and "On Passing Thru Amiens, May 1918" in No. 53 of the Bulletin. Also the printer's and proof-reader's, as well as the editor's apologies are tendered for the omission of a line from the latter poem which should have read:

ON PASSING THRU AMIENS, MAY, 1918

A bit of ivy clambers o'er the wall
Of this forsaken house in Amiens;
Its crumbling shell-torn stones about it fall,
Its street is lonely and devoid of men...
Deserted is this city of the dead,
Unseeing, cold, its shutters blind stare down,
Unheeding of the lonely sentry's tread,
Insensate to the sadness of the town...
Gone, gone the folk of all these pleasant streets,
Gone all the colors, all the swirl of life,
Gone all the sounds, save where the cannon beats,
And adds, each hour, new sadness to the strife ;
And yet, here where the ruins hourly fall,
This bit of ivy clambers o'er the wall.

R. A. D., S.S.U. 636 (old 18).

-------------------

NIGHT ON THE FRONT

Around me roars the fury of a night
Whose erstwhile tranquil summer skies are overborne
And crimsoned by the ravage of the fight
From whose nocturnal distances are torn
The myst'ries once so pregnant in the womb
Of its ethereal darkness. High and higher
Flare the star-shells, by whose light the tomb
Of this last butchered day is bathed in fire.

Before me, outlined on the trembling hill,
The trench line lies like some huge, endless snake
Whose serpentine convulsions now are still
But who abides a crafty time to make
The sudden move that spreads his poison far.
The rockets' glares are but his million eyes
His hiss is in the speeding shells that mar
The green turf where his uncouth body lies.

The star-shells flare; night gapes another wound
For each gun fired and each new signal light;
These multiply ; ere long the night has swooned
Before the fair, false dazzle of the fight.

Brighter and yet brighter still it glows,
And night is day, but day made red with strife,
While drunk with his achievement, on man goes
Upon the mission that makes death of life...

And then, his puny fury spent, he calls
His legions into silence, and the fight
Fades into distance, and a quiet falls,
And man-made day is vanquished by a night
As calm, unruffled as before the hour
When first a star shell flared or first a gun
Belched forth the venom of its evil pow'r
To summon mates to action, one by one.

And thus about me falls the tranquil night
While, rich in mystery, the summer skies
Bring forth the clear, inimitable light
Of God's own stars --- that are the patient eyes
Of those we knew and loved once long ago,
And who are dead (or so we say) yet see
How little we poor humans live to know,
Since death is but life in Eternity.

J. B. C. (S.S.U. 635, old 17).

-------------------

 

ABOUT BOOKS AGAIN

Mr. ERNEST POOLE'S "HIS FAMILY",

Following the suggestion contained in one of your recent issues, which suggestion had been made on a previous occasion by Emerson, when he said that "private readers would serve us by leaving each the shortest note of what he found ", I shall proceed to voice my opinion of Mr. Ernest Poole's recent work "His Family".

Is not our family, both present and to come, the topic in which everyone of us is most vitally interested? --- and anything that can make our understanding of the intimate personal relations more clear --- is not that a very oasis in the desert?

Mr. Poole deals with a very ordinary family, even as yours or mine. There are no violent thrills, no overpowering emotions--- because these things have no place in the lives of ordinary people.

The story deals with an elderly Father and his three grown daughters, following their gradual development, in marriage, in public life, in motherhood, in high society; --- and the entire action is seen through the brain of the old gentleman, with stress laid upon the joys and sorrows, the perplexities and convictions of the life that he leads in the lives his children.

Mr. Poole has a glorious control of the language, his observation and description of color, form, sound and silence are so simple as to seem almost obvious ; --- and he has a splendid idea of the modern American character, ever, pushing itself free of the sinuous tentacles of Mid-Victorian culture, and struggling for something more in keeping with this new age of airplane post and electric incubators.

Further, and still better, there is none of your flinching from true sentiment ; every family has its moments of clear thinking and plain speaking, especially in these times of crisis, and there is nothing gained by avoiding them. You will find all those moments faithfully portrayed, together with all the little jokes, the little quarrels, the mild deceits that combine to form the very essence of life in a modern family. ,

Paul A. RIE.
S. S. U. 637 (old 19)

-------------------

MILITARY FRANCE THEN AND NOW

In continuation of the recently inaugurated custom of sending literary notices to the Bulletin, let me call the readers' attention to an excellent little reprint brought out by that very active new Paris publishing house Bossard, 43, rue Madame.

" Traité de la Guerre en Général" was first printed at The Hague in 1742, by "An Officer of Distinction", and is now republished just as it appeared in the original edition, the quaint spelling and vocabulary of the eighteenth century giving an additional charm to the book. The price is 2 f r. 50.

Every old Field Service man who is still doing his bit in this war, and especially the young officers, should read this "Treatise", for besides furnishing much curious information about the military system of the old régime, it suggests many thoughts concerning the present conflict. When you close the covers, you will have a still deeper admiration for France, for you will perceive that even a century and three-quarters ago, the war spirit of this nation was lofty and that the abominable Prussian ways would have been as severely condemned then as now.

An ex-orderly of the old
Ambulance Américaine de Neuilly.

(Editor's note. The Editor of the Bulletin hopes that other Bulletin readers will follow the lead of the two above contributors, and send in brief commentaries upon books which they have found worth while.)

-------------------

 

WAR

Marcel Lafitte was packing his kit to go back to Paris on "perme"
Leaving his place in the fetid trench to the cooties, the totos and worms.
As his comrades watched with envious eyes while he donned his new issue of clothes
He sagely smiled at all their jests like a man who a secret knows.

Marcel was vain in his Gallic way he dressed with scrupulous care
He posed with his cap for a rakish tilt, and he wasted an age on his hair.
Then into the top of his pack he thrust, a bayonet, sharp as a knife
German it was, he had picked it up as a souvenir for his wife

The, dull drab skies and the barren ground seemed merry and gay to Marcel,
And the seven days about to be spent were a change to heaven from hell.
It was joy to live, as he pictured there, the wife he had left alone
And softly. he hummed as he waited the train the strains of the" Madelone".

But never before had seemed so slow the march of the laboring train
Though much as he hated the life he had left, he would go through it all again,
All and worse for the deep content that showed in his shining eyes
As he hurried along through the crowed gare, --- he could see her happy surprise.

The time seemed long ere he reached the house in the outskirts of Montmartre
It was there in tears when the war began she had watched him gayly depart
To fight for la France, --- it was long since then, - how weary he was of the war.
He wished that his "perme" was his last return as loudly he rapped on the door.

He rapped again more stoutly when there was no, response within
And then as he paced the icy street there suddenly came to him
A fearful thought which much as he fought came surging back for belief,
Till he sought a neighbor to know the worst or the best either would be relief.

Did you ever feel the despair that must reign in. the bottom abyss of hell?
If you did you may know a trace of the black that tinged the soul of Marcel.
Did you ever feel that life was wrong and wish for a speedy death
That you'd drunk the bitterness to the dregs and you cursed your very breath.

Did you ever know what it is to think you had lived all your days in vain
Like a yellowed leaf on an Autumn tree that rots in the Autumn rain?
Not a stage in all the gamut of griefs had failed to fall to his lot
Lafitte believed as he listened, crushed, and wished to deny but could not.

She was tired of he life, so lonesome, he heard, and wearied of waiting and all,
So had broken her pledge, deceived and misled, the mistress of old Duval!
Marcel was crazed in a silent maze then a rage burst out in his heart
For a life of ease and luxury she had sold her soul in the mart.

She had thrown aside the love he gave as a thing to be thrown away
But worse that all her damning deceit was the thought of her harlots pay!
Naught but fury and thirst to kill held place in his maddened brain
And he sought the house where the neighbor said she had sold herself for gain.

And he found them there in all their guilt where the dotard had lavishly spent,
His wealth in garnished surroundings in pursuit of his passionate bent
Then a moment he paused in the door of the room like a figure of ruthless fate
While his eyes were narrowed with passion and they gleamed and burned with hate.

In silence he thus surveyed them, unheeding her pleading and tears,
Then he pulled from his pack the bayonet he had meant as a souvenir.
When the servants found it later, it was gory and dripping with red
And there half dressed on the floor of the room a woman and [man lay dead.

David DARRAH,
Reserve Mallet..

-------------------

NOTES

Along about the first of April three old American Field Service men passed thru Paris on their way to the Saumur Artillery School. They left old section 18, or section 636. They were, Kenneth Bailey, Elmer Elmore and M. E. Tedford.

All three have passed the course and are now 2nd Lieutenants in the Artillery. Bailey and Elmore were sent to the front. Tedford is being held at the Saumur School in the capacity of an instructor.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

STANLEY HILL

Stanley Hill, S. S U. 28 (now 640) died August 14th, 1918 at the hospital in La Veuve as a. result of wounds received July 16th, while on service in Reims. Hill was a Dartmouth student. He joined the American Field Service May 10th, 1917, and went to the front with Section 28, which was known as the Dartmouth section. He is the third Dartmouth man in that section to give his life for France, Paul Osborn having been killed in July 1917 during the first week of the section's existence, and Clayton Ellis having been killed during July 1918. Hill's home was in Lexington, Massachusetts.

-------------------

LIEUTENANT BOLLAERT

Lieutenant Bollaert, of S. S. U. 628 (old Section 8) was killed by a shell at the front on August 11th. Lieutenant Bollaert was one of the veterans of the Field Service, --- having been attached to old Section 8 as French officer in February 1917. He had been in the section for a year and a half. Since the recent withdrawal of Lieutenant de Turckheim from old Section 4, after two and a half years of service with it, and the withdrawal of Lieutenant Rodocanachi from old section 2, after more than two years of service with it, Lieutenant Bollaert was « le plus ancien de tous nos officiers français. »

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

John Valle Janes S.S.U. 2 Corporal 128th Field Artillery A. E. F.
Marvin Hughitt Frost T.M.U. 184 Train Master Troop Transportation, U. S. A.
Blake Leigh Lawrence S.S.U. 64 Cadet, Infantry, British Army.
Lewis C. Pounds S.S.U. 66 Ensign, Naval Aviation U.S.A.
Hugh Gallaher T.M.U. 184 2nd Lieut. Railroad Trans. Corps, A. E. F.
Thomas Avery Dain T.M.U. 184 Pvt. Q. M. Dept. Provisional Co. D.
Bernard Paul Schroeder S.S.U. 2 Sous/L. French Aviation.
Samuel Cabot Almy S.S.U. 4 2nd Lieut. 4th U. S. F. A. U.S.A.
Elmer Jacques Bloom T.M.U. 537 Seaman, Navy, Coxswain School U. S. A.
P. D. Allison S.S.U. 18 Pvt. S. S. U. 630, U. S. A. A. S.
John Bennett Carrington Jr. S.S.U. 67 Flying Cadet, Army Aviation U. S. A.
Merrill Denison S.S.U. 4 2nd Lieut. 14 Machine Gun Battalion, A. E. F.
N. Wainwright S.S.U. 9 Pvt. Battery A, 102 F. A. A. E. F.
T. S. Holt S.S.U. 2 1st Lieut. U. S. Field Artillery A. E. F.
George P. Kreider T.M.U. 526 2nd Lieut. Tractor Artillery School at Vincennes.
Thomas C. Jones T.M.U. 526 Lieut. 147th Regt. Infantry Inf. N. A.
George Seelye T.M.U. 526 2nd Lieut. Field Artillery at Saumur.
Horace Huey T.M.U. 526 2nd Lieut. Q. M. D. In charge of convoys of auto trucks across the States.
Winthrop Wilcox T.M.U. 526 Lieut. in Tank Corps.
Francis Joseph Beatty S.S.U. 4 Capt. Co. F. 118th Infantry 30th Division, A. E. F.
Wilfred Dillon S.S.U. 4 Pvt. Co. G, 310th Infantry A.E.F.
Eustace Lane Adams S.S.U. 3 Ensign U. S. Naval Reserve Force U. S. Naval Aviation,
Frederick D. Adams, Jr. S.S.U. 67 Sgt. 519th B'n Service Engineers.
Gordon Herves Allen T.M.U. 397 Sgt. Light Tank Corps Camp Colt, U. S. A.
George K. Denison T.M.U. 189 Flying Cadet, Aviation U.S.A.
William Dock S.S.U. 2 Medical Student, U. S. A.

-------------------

 

VISITORS AT 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

R. A. Donaldson (S.S.U. 18) U. S. A. A. S.; L: A. MacPherson (S.S.U. 19) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; George P. Kreider (T.M.U. 526) 2nd Lieut. Tractor Artillery School, A. E. F.; Ralph A. Woodend (T.M.U. 397) Motor Transport Corp Hdqs. Advance Sect. ; J. B. Hendricks Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; Lawrence J. Moran (S.S.U. 32) Hdqs U. S. A. A. S.; A. J. Putnam (S.S.U. 18) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; W. G. Rice (S.S.U. 1 et 66) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S.; E. C. Beall (T.M.U. 133) EIève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; R. R. Ball (S.S.U. 69) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; Edward Mack Gildea (T.M.U. 133) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; J. B. Watkins (S.S.U. 15) A. R. C. Military Hospital No. 1 ; Charles U. Caesar (T.M.U. 184) 2nd Lieut. Office Director M. T. C. Mallet Reserve ; James W. Harle, Jr. (S.S.U. 2 and 10) Sgt. Q. Dept. U. S. A. A. S.; H. W. Patterson (T.M.U. 133 and 526) Artillery School ; H. B. Harter (S.S.U. 70) Aspirant, French Artillerie ; F. P. Nash (T.M.U. 397) Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; Travis P. Lane (T.M.U. 133) Aspirant, French Artillery; B. P. Eldred (S.S.U. 66) Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; Homer Dixon (S.S.U. 68) U. S. A. A. S.; John Savoy (S.S.U. 68) U. S. A. A. S.; Frederick L. Sexton (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S. Vernon McClelland (S.S.U. 68) U. S. A. A. S.; Homer Gage (S.S.U. 31) U. S. A. A. S.; Russell Leavitt (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; James W. Shaw (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; Charles E. Dougherty (S.S.U. 19) U. S. A. A. S. ; Charles C. Hoskins S.S.U. 19) U. S. A. A. S.; William Rodgers (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S.; Donald K. Miller (T.M.U. 37) Q. M. C. Mallet Réserve ; Everett Stanley (S.S.U. 12) Hdqts 26th Div. A. E. F. George R. Fearing (S.S.U. 29) Pvt. 1st cl. U. S. A. A. S. accompanied by Sherlock "the police dog mascot" of the Section; William J. Bingham (S. S. U. 2) Capt. U. S. A. A. S. ;B. K. Neftel (S.S.U. 17) Lieut. U. S. A A. S. ; M. S. Owens (S.S.U. 8) Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; W. D. Swan, Jr. (S.S.U. 10) 151st Brigade F. A., A. E F. ; George G. Haven (S.S.U. 12) 2nd Lieut. U. S. F. A. ; Edward S. Ingham (T.M.U. 397) Aspirant 15e R. A C.; Scott Russel (S.S.U. 3 and 8) Italian Service; Lawrence Fisher (S.S.U. 65 and 3) Italian Service ; Douglas M. Smith (T.M.U. 397) 21e Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie ; John Craig, Jr. (SSU. 2) 21e Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie ; Robert Whitney (S.S.U. 68) 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service'; Harry D. Wood (S.S.U. 69) 21e Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie ; Jos. Desloge (S.S.U. 10) Aspirant 11e R. A. C. ; Kenneth Wesley (S.S.U. 69) 21e Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie ; Harry B. Harter (S.S.U. 70) Aspirant 268° R. A. C. ; Henry M. Hamilton (S.S.U. 69) 21° Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie ; R. R. Ball (S.S.U. 69) 52e Brigade Ecole d'Artillerie ; Jos. C. MacDonald (S.S.U. 16) 2nd Lieut. U. S. Aviation ; Arthur O. Phinney (Vosges Det. S.S.U. 4 and 33) Directeur Regional Adjoint des Foyers des Soldats ; H. S. Bates (T.M.U. 526) 52e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; H. W. Patterson (T.M.U. 526) 52° Brigade, Fontainebleau ; U. E. Boulanger (P.O.) British Army A. S. C. ; Edward Mack Gildea (T.M.U. 133) 520 Brigade, Fontainebleau ; Alan S. Brown (T.M.U. 397) 52° Brigade, Fontainebleau ; John S. McCampbell. (S.S.U. 69) 52e Brigade Fontainebleau ; R. R. Ball (S.S.U. 69) 52° Brigade, Fontainebleau ; J. H. Chipman (T.M.U. 184) 52, Brigade, Fontainebleau; Hosmer A. Johnson (T.M.U. 397) ; James M. White (S.S.U. 1) 1st Lieut. Gas Service ; W. de F. Bigelow (S.S.U. 4) Capt. U. S. A. A. S.; W. H. Rubinkam (S.S.U. 13 and 3) Cadet Naval Aviation; W. C. Gilmore (S.S.U. 1) Cadet Naval Aviation; B. F. Butler (S.S.U. 13) Sgt. U.S.A.A.S. ; L. C. Doyle (S.S.U. 3) Capt. Sanitary Corps ; Richard H. Stout (S.S.U. 1) U. S. Air Service ; M: H. Roblee (T.M.U. 526) Aspirant 265° R. A. C. ; J. M. Parmalee (S.S.U. 27) Aspirant 275° R. A. C.; Emerson Low (S.S.U. 27 and 8) U. S. A. A. S. Vernon Caughell (S.S.U. 14) A. S. S. C. ; Thomas Tarrant (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Air Service, A. E. F. ; H. H. Houston (S.S.U. 12 and T.M.U. 133) 1st Lieut U. S. A. F. E. Wallace (S.S.U. 33) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; Julian Burton (S.S.U. 18) U. S. A. A. S.; Paul D. Woodman (T.M.U. 526) M. T. D. Reserve Mallet; Charles L. Goodwill (S.S.U. 12 and ) U. S. A. A. S. ; J. I. Bliss (S.S.U. 71) A. R. C. Evian-les-Bains; T. S. Bosworth (P. O.) Top Sgt. U. S. A. A. S.; John H. Boyd (hdqts.) and Lieut. U. S. A.


AFS Bulletin Number Fifty-Nine

Index