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-------------------

THE. FIELD SERVICE HONOR ROLL

The following comrades of the old Field Service have given their lives in the course of their duty with the French or American armies. The list is doubtless incomplete and the information presented concerning these fifty six men is not as full as we should like to make it, nor is it probably in all respects accurate. We shall welcome any additions or corrections which our readers may be good enough to send us, which will make our records of old Field Service men more adequate. We appeal especially for your cooperation in this regard.

AVARD, Percy L., (S.S.U. 1) Died Naval Hospital, Charleston, S. C. Mch. 25, 1918.
BALBIANI, Roger M. L. (S.S.U. 1) French Aviation. Killed in action June 1918.
BAER, Carlos W. (T.M.U. 184) Died in Barracks, Columbus, Ohio. Apr. 6, 1918.
BARCLAY, Norman L. (S.S.U. 2) French Aviation. Killed in service. 1917.
BAYLIES, Frank L., (S.S.U. 1 and 3) French Aviation. Killed in air battle June 1918.
BENNEY, Philip P., (S.S.U. 12) French Aviation. Killed in air battle February 1918.
BENTLEY, Paul C., (S.S.U. 65) Ambulance driver. Died of wounds September 15, 1917.
BIGELOW, Donald A. (S.S.U. 17) U. S. Aviation. Killed ii aviation accident. July 1918.
BLODGETT, Richard, (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Aviation. Killed May 22, 1918.
BLUETHENTHAL, Arthur, (S.S.U. 3) French Aviation. Killed in action. July 1918.
BURR Carlton, (S.S.U. 2 and 9) U. S. Marines. Killed in action July 24, 1918.
CLARK, Coleman T., (S.S.U. 3) French Artillery. Died of wounds May 29, 1918.
CLOVER, Greayer, (T.M.U. 133) U. S. Aviation. Killed in accident Aug. 31, 1918.
CONOVER, Richard, (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Infantry. Killed in. action, June 1918.
CRAIG, Harmon B., (S.S.U. 2) Ambulance driver. Killed by shell, July 15, 1917.
CUMMINGS, H. H., (T.M.U. 526) Drowned on transport Antilles October 17, 1917.
DAVISON, Alden, (S.S.U. 8) U. S. Aviation. Killed while training Dec. 20, 1917.
DIX, Roger S., (S.S.U. I) U. S. Aviation. Killed in aeroplane accident May 16, 1918.
DUBOUCHET, Vivian, (S.S.U. 2 et Vosges Det.) U S. Infantry. Killed in action May 10, 1918.
ELLIS, Clayton C.. (S S.U. 28) U. S. Army Ambulance Service. Killed by shell. August 7, 1918.
EMERSON, W. K. Bond, (S.S.U. 3) U. S. Artillery observer. Killed in action May 14, 1918.
FOWLER, Eric A., (S.S.U. 4) French Aviation. Killed while training. May 1918.
GAlLEY, James W., (S.S.U. 66) Ambulance driver. Killed in service July 29, 19x7.
GIROUX, Ernest A., (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Aviation. Killed May 21, 1918.
GRAHAM, John R., (S.S.U.2) U. S. Infantry. Killed in action July 1918.
HAGAN; W. B. (S.S.U. 12) British aviation. Died while training. July 1918.
HALL Richard N., (S.S.U. 3) Ambulance driver. Killed in service December 24, 1915.
HAMILTON, Perley R., . (S.S.U. 66) Ambulance driver. Killed in Service July 29, 1917.
HATHAWAY, Edward T. (S.S.U. 17, U. S. Aviation. Killed in action August 1918.
HILL, Stanley. (S.S.U. 28) U. S. Army Ambulance Service. Died of wounds August 14, 1918.
HOBBS, Warren, (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Aviation. Killed in air battle June 26, 1918.
HOPKINS, Charles A., (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Aviation. Killed while training Feb. 1918.
HOUSTON, Henry H., (S.S.U. 12 and T.M.U. 133) U. S. Artillery. Killed by shell, August 18, 1918.
KELLEY, Edward J., (S.S.U. 4) Ambulance driver. Killed in service September 23, 1916.
KING, Gerald C., (S.S.U. 8) Died of pneumonia March 1918.
KURTZ, Paul, (S.S.U. 1 et 18) French Aviation. Killed in action. June 1918.
LEACH, Ernest H., (S.S.U. 18) Aviation. Killed in training, Feb. 1918.
LEE, Schuyler (T.M.U. 526) French Aviation. Killed in action, April 1918.
LINES, Howard, (S.S.U. 1 and 8) Ambulance driver. Died of pneumonia December 24th 1916.
MACKENZIE, Gordon S. (S.S.U. 10 and 2) U. S. Army Ambulance Service. Died of wounds received in action June 22, 1918.
McCONNELL, James R. (S.S.U. 2.) French Aviation. Killed in air battle March 1917.
MEACHAM, Robert D. (S.S.U. 16) U. S. Aviation. Died of pneumonia Dec. 14, 1917.
MYERS, Arthur (S.S.U. 15) Ambulance driver. Died of shell shock July 1917.
NEWLIN, John V., (S.S.U. 29) Ambulance driver. Killed in service August 19x7.
NICHOLS, Alan H., (S.S.U. 14) U. S. Aviation. Died of wounds June 1918.
NORTON, G. Frederick, (S.S.U. I) Ambulance driver. Killed in Service June 1917.
OSBORN, Paul, (S.S.U. 28) Ambulance driver. Killed in service June 21, 1917.
PALMER, Henry B., (S.S.U. 3) French Aviation. Died of pneumonia, January 1918.
SARGEANT, G. LeM., (S.S..U. 16) U. S. Aviation. Died of pneumonia, Apr. 16, 1918.
SORTWELL, Edward C. (S.S.U. 8 and 3) Ambulance driver. Killed at Salonique, Nov. 1916.
STEWART, Gordon, (S.S.U. 18). U. S. Aviation. Died of meningitis, 1918.
SUCKLEY, Henry M., (S.S.U. 3 and 10) Ambulance officer. Killed in service March, 1917.
WARNER, Goodwin (T.M.U. 397) U. S. Motor Transport. Corps. Died of pneumonia June 28, 1918.
WOODWARD, Houston. (S.S.U. 13) French Aviation. Killed, 1918.
WOODWORTH, Benj. R., (S.S.U. 1) Ambulance driver. Killed in accident June 1917.
WHYTE, William J., (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Aviation. Killed in 4 aeroplane accident March 20, 1918.
WRIGHT, Jack Morris, (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Aviation. Killed in training Feb. 1, 1918.

-------------------

   MOONLIGHT AND THE RUINS

A ruined village and the pale moon's light
On shattered wall and broken gate and tower
Stillness of dreams in the star-haunted night,
Stillness of death through each uncounted hour,
For empty church and vacant home now sleep
In crumbled quietness, and over all,
The silver slanting rays and shadows deep
Across the broken stone and plaster fall.

Wm. Cary SANGER, Jr,
1st. Lieut. Inf. R. C.
(Formerly member of S. S. U. 9)

France, August 28th, 1918.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

GRANDVILLE LeMOYNE SARGEANT

Grandville Le Moyne Sargeant died of pneumonia on April 16th, 1918. He had been accepted for aviation and was studying while waiting to be called for service when he was taken ill and died. Sargeant joined the American Field Service in March 1917 and served five months with Section 16, returning then to America.

-------------------

ODDS AND ENDS

Infantry Coolidge --- Edmund Jefferson Coolidge to be exact and formal --- has realized his long cherished ambition and obtained a transfer to the doughboys with whom he hopes soon to scale the top and enjoy a little pig-sticking. The entire section mourns the loss of "Infantry", but rejoices that he was able to at last achieve the sphere in which he believes, he can best help to take the helm away from Wilhelm.

"Ignatz" Garritt, who used to dazzle the girls back in the States when he twirled for Harvard, but now dazzles their French sisters by twirling his natty moustache, inherited "Mais Non". Maybe you remember, "Mais Non" was a frisky fox owned by our late lamented Infantry Coolidge. Garritt, who knows all the intricacies of the "fox trot", felt unqualified for fox culture, so he took Mais Non " far into some famous woods near ....... There he turned "Mais Non" loose. The little led chap gave one look of surprised delight and disappeared with a waving of bushy tail.

Lewis W. Mustard Jr., better known as the father of Lewis W. Mustard 3rd (who will reach; draft age in just 15 years) ; Lewis W. Mustard, Jr. is going to write a book. It will be entitled "20.000 La Gales over me". As you may have guessed, it will bare the secrets of how to track down the hungry La Gale in your own clothes, and how to know him when you see him. "Muss", to grow familiar, spent two sessions in a French hospital, not convalescing but, more properly, fumigating from the effects of la gale and knows whereof he speaks.

The American M. P.s grow more careless as they grow more accustomed to their jobs. F'instance, Slats Harvey, Marty Muldoon, Stud Poker Bernstein and Bunk Bridget spent an entire permission including a time in naughty Paree, without once getting arrested.

"Chet" McArthur is getting to be a terrible boy. When some American Engineers took him to the Pink Turtle, in......., he became so enamoured of the beer that he loaded a 55 litre keg into his car before starting home. Them was the happy days in the section! Ignatz Garritt almost had heart failure, however, as he was on poste two days after the beer arrived and was afraid the keg would be dry before he reached home again. However there was glory enough for all.

"Nip" Nazel claims the distinction of being the first member of the section to see and salute General Pershing.

The world is coming to an end! Charlie Richardson admitted in a rash moment that Paris in some respects is a more attractive place than Bernville, Pennsylvania.

Wild Willie McCarthy, once a lowly corporal, today sports the dignity of a sergeancy, and John DeWitt Toll, Jr., is a corporal. "Dave" Warfield is now a lance corporal. These changes were due to the departure of Sgt. Jim Seymour, now Lieutenant of 580.

By the way --- do your Christmas shopping early!

J. B. C. 17/635.

-------------------

EIGHTEEN HOURS IN A SHELL HOLE

This was over a month ago when I was in the line on detached service with the English and had the opportunity to go out on a patrol with them. I was especially glad of this chance as it is part of our work to be ready to go out on patrols in the Regimental Intelligence Section.

We went "over the top" at twelve midnight with all intentions of getting back by two --- our objective being about eight hundred yards out. However we were cut short within a few yards of our destination where we met with a patrol of Jerry's and had to put up a fight which we were ready for. This was about in the middle of the famous "No Man's Land" and by a skilful trick on the part of two of Jerry's men (even if I do have to admit it) they managed to get me separated. This gave me more than I had planned on, for it left me one to at least five or more of their men. From here, I then dodged through some brush and after first getting tangled up in some of their wire --- took refuge by camouflaging myself, in the nearest shell hole. I could hear them in pursuit on all sides, to say nothing of the rapid firing, so that it would have been suicide to move before the following night. I took my bearings the next afternoon by building a kind of parapet to occasionally look over and laid out a course to come back on the following night which was difficult, as I had little idea of the location of the gaps in the wire which would have proved itself if you had seen my uniform --- or at least what remained of it when I finally did get back about midnight or later the following night ; having crawled back the larger half of the way under and over some barbed-wire in an old evacuated communicating trench.

The Germans we encountered were apparently wearing English uniforms (probably taken from prisoners) so that it was next to impossible to distinguish the Hun in the dark from one of our own patrol, unless you were close enough to recognize the face which was a predicament on my part as I was the only American and had only seen the men I went out with for about five minutes before "going over the top". Besides this I was also led astray by one of them (a Hun as it turned out) appearing to be wounded and I was going to make mighty certain (regardless of the risk) that it wasn't one of our own men and in doing so it also helped toward getting me separated.

No, we didn't bring back any prisoners nor did we reach our objective but we did locate a listening-post and on my way back the next night I found another. I also had a chance to examine their wire and their system used --- found where they were digging a tunnel and while in the shell-hole had heard them tapping-wire.

It was well worth the experience (now that I am back) and it certainly gives one a certain amount of confidence for the next time.

John F. AMORY,
107 U. S. Infantry,
(Formerly S.S.U. 4).

-------------------

LETTERS TO THE BULLETIN

Editor of the Field Service Bulletin.

Dear Editor

It is long since I have seen a Bulletin and I miss it. Wherefore I enclose a scrap of francs to cover a little subscription time If you could gather back numbers for August and the latter part of July I should much appreciate their being sent to me.

Thank you --- and all success.

Sincerely,

James W. D. SEYMOUR,
S.S.U. 580,
(Formerly of S.S.U. 17).

To the Editor,

I wish to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of copies of the Bulletin. It certainly should not be necessary to appeal and urge that this increasingly valuable source of information --- this bellows by the old Foyer--- be more extensively read and contributed to by those who have shared that mingled spirit of service and adventure that moved and had its being in the old ambulance.

This Field Service spirit is worth being transfused from the old body into the mighty organization of the A. E. F. It is splendid to see that the old spirit lives and that its outline appears in the Bulletin.

As one looks back over just a short space of time to the days of the "Croix de guerre hunting, duty dodgers and outcasts", such features of our way at rue Lekain, Dombasle, Meaux, Dommiers, the lovely valley of the Aisne and that most splendid of Frenchmen, Captain Mallet, stirs a sort of tender emotion. The Bulletin renders us an inestimable service in keeping alive and warm, this sentiment.

You ask for notes from former members of the Field Service, as a matter of record. After considerable peculation as to the best way to get into the big game, I did the obvious thing and decided to give myself a thorough tryout with the Regulars. So on February 7th, 1918 I enlisted in Paris as a Buck Private in the Field Artillery of the Regular Army. I was shipped immediately to the 1st Division and assigned to "C" Battery of the 7th. In less than a week from the day I enlisted I was at the front with the battery in action. I suspect that this is a record time for that particular course. The first month was spent in penetrating the mysteries of the Picket Line and acquiring the art of pick and shovel. Then I advanced to a gun squad and had a little experience in liaison work. On May 7th, after we came over to the Picardy front, I was made Sergeant Major of the 1st Battalion.

July 1st I commenced the course at the C. D. S. at Saumur. By October 1st I am hoping to return to the front on leave.

Sincerely yours,

H. B. BARTON.

-------------------

NOTES

All old members of the Field Service will be happy to learn of the arrival in France of Mr. Henry D. Sleeper, the American representative of the service. To his indefatigable efforts in America during the first-three years of the war the growth and success of the organization was very largely due. His untiring devotion to the organization and his personal interest in its members have won for him innumerable friends, who, though scattered through all branches of the American and French armies, still cherish the recollection of his kindness to them in old Field Service days.- Mr. Sleeper will remain at 21 rue Raynouard, and continue actively to look after Field Service interests.

Corp. S. L. Hicks, S. S. U. 638 (old 69) who enlisted in U. S. A. A. S. and was sent to Artillery School has received commission of 2nd Lieut. U. S. F. A.

In our issue for August we printed, a gallant letter from James A. Gamman, formerly of Section 13, and now of the French Foreign Legion. In its number for Sunday. August 25th, the New-York Times gives the letter in full under a "display head". It was worthy of this recognition.

-------------------

FIELD SERVICE LITERATURE

Second Lieutenant H. C. Roth, of the Artillery and formerly o Section 14, writes us from the front:

« Are there any books about the old Field Service since 'Friends of France' appeared? If so, I would like to secure them. Has the 'Field Service History' come out yet?

In answer to the above inquiry, we print herewith a list of some of the books. written by old Field Service men and which give their experiences:

"Camion Letters. " Edited by Professor Martin W. Sampson, of Cornell University. New-York : Henry Holt. 1918.

"An Ambulance Driver in France. " By Philip Sidney Rice. Wilkes Barre, Penn. 1918.

"Trucking to the Trenches." By John Iden Kautz. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. 1917.

"Ambulance 464." By Julien H. Bryan. New-York : The Macmillan Co. 1918.

"At the Front in a Flivver. " By William Yorke Stevenson. Boston : Houghton Mifflin Company. 1917.

"A Volunteer Poilu." By Henry Sheahan. Boston Houghton Mifflin Company. 1916.

"The White Road of Mystery. " By Philip Dana Orcutt. New-York : John Lane Company. 1918.

"Ambulance No. 10." By Leslie Buswell. Boston : Houghton Mifflin Company.

These books can be obtained free of cost, as a loan, through the American Library Association, 10, rue de l'Elysée, Paris.

As regards Lieutenant Roth's question concerning the Field Service History, we may repeat that the work is well under way but it will be some time yet before it can be published, as it will be in two large volumes, with illustrations, tables and maps made especially for it. The preparation of all these things occasions considerable delay, especially in war times and with an ocean between editor and publisher.

-------------------

SOME LITERARY NOTES

That books and periodicals play an important part in the life of our soldiers has always been a belief of the Bulletin. We have had many evidences of this. Here is a fresh one. One of our old Transport Drivers writes us from the front:

"Do you think you could be able to secure me a copy of Julien Bryan's "Ambulance 464"? I have tried everywhere to get a copy but have failed. Naturally I was quite interested in the book since Bryan was in my own section No. 12.

« My letter to the N. Y. Herald anent reading matter has produced wonders. I have received books from titled English women and French engineers, from some Belgian refugee; and unknown French girls, -- enough material to last quite a time. I always have such a wonderful feeling of security if I have books around me."

Apropos of that excellent book "At the Front in a Flivver", its author, First Lieutenant W. Yorke Stevenson, formerly of old Field Service Section 1, and now of S.S.U. 625, writes us:

"My first book dwelt the Section up to the end of 1916, and my new volume is composed of a set of diaries which carries the Section's history up to the time it was taken over by the U. S. army in September 1917. It will be out this autumn."

We have received this inquiry from a former Field Service man now at the front:

"I'd like some sort of History of the War, if you have time to look one up, --- something not awfully long, and yet one that has a pretty good line on big efforts and how they were carried out."

In a general way, we would suggest that such requests be addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Burton E. Stevenson both experienced librarians, now in charge of that fine A. E. F. book depository of the American Library Association, 10, rue de l'Elysée, Paris. They can say not only what is the right book in the right place, but are ready to send it out free of charge even as regards carriage.

In the meanwhile we venture to suggest as "filling the bill" in this instance, especially as we know that our correspondent reads French, the work of that veteran French journalist, M. Gaston Jollivet, issued by Hachette et Ct 79, boulevard Saint-Germain, Paris. So far six paper-cover volumes have been published, each volume costing 3 fr. 50, and bringing the narrative down to the summer of 1916. A new volume is now in press.

These little books contain a mass of information concerning every phase of the war on all the fronts, presented in the clear, orderly way peculiar to French histories. We know of no work in the field chosen by the author, which compares with these volumes.

Some of the visitors to No. 21 have been in the habit of taking back with them to the front books from the Club Library. The club librarian wishes us to point out that this action is as unnecessary as it is irregular. The books at the club are a loan and should be eventually returned to the American Library Association and the Red Cross, and the club is responsible for their return. Hence the request that members do not take books from the premises, especially as they themselves can obtain these same books in a regular manner, by borrowing them directly from the American Library Association, 10, rue de l'Elysée, Paris.

This same remark applies to members of the Club residing in Paris and only taking their meals at No. 21. They should not take club books home with them, but obtain books for home use from the dépôt in the rue de l'Elysée.

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Carlyle H. Holt S.S.U. 2 Cpl. Co. A, 101st. U. S. Engineers 26th Division, A.E.F.
Dewey Muscott Campbell S.S.U. 65 Pvt. U. S. A. A. S. Sec. 530 U. S. Army.
Edmund Graves Brown T.M.U. 133 With U. S. Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corps, U.S.A.
William Palmer Smith, Jr. S.S.U. 27 2nd Lieut. Field Artillery American E F.
Charles H. Fabens T.M.U. 526 Elève Aspirant, 21e Brigade, école d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.
F. P. Goodrich S.S.U. 12 Elève Aspirant, 21e Brigade, école d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.
D. M. Wesson S.S.U. 70 Elève Aspirant, 21e Brigade, école d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.
R. H. Fussell T.M.U. 397 Elève Aspirant, 21e Brigade, école d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.
Douglas M. Smith T.M.U. 397 Elève Aspirant, 21e Brigade, école d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.
James L. Carson S.S.U. 1 Sgt. Major, 11th Engineers (Railways) A. E. F.
John Sharpe Chafee T.M.U. 526 2nd Lieut. 30th Class School of Fire, Fort Sill, Okla.
William R. Pentz T.M.U. 526 U. S. Aviation, Chemical Dept. A. E. F.
George M. Hollister S.S.U. 3 2nd Lieut. 1st Bn. 61st Infantry, A. E. F.
Walter Amos Huston S.S.U 67 Pvt. 51 Co. 13 Pro. Rect Bn. Camp Lee, Va.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

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Three Months

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Civilians by post

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"      "       "

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-------------------

                THE VANQUISHED

What is this Self that now proclaims, I-am?
That dreams new dreams or none at all, forsooth?
Somewhere along the scarred Chemin des Dames,
         I lost my Youth.

Something has dimmed the old ideals I sought;
A sterner sadder Self is left instead
Of that which saw such sorrow, death hell-wrought,
         A part is dead.

Youth lies beneath the Deathwind blowing there,
The ring lost in its laugh, its fervor gone,
This Self, newborn, sees greater duties, fares
         Upward and on.

D. D. Réserve Mallet

August 29, 1918.

-------------------

               A NIGHT IN WINTER

Darkness and cold,
And the squeak and scuffle of rats
About time old deserted house and hayloft.
Now and again we hear ---
Somewhere far out in the frozen night ---
The distant thunder of the guns,
And, from the cobweb-covered glass of a little window,
We can see
The weird and troubled flashes along the dim horizon.
Minutes seem like hours --- before we get to sleep ---
But we draw the army blankets tighter around oar chins
And try to forget
The cold and the darkness
And the rats in the old deserted house and hayloft.

Wm. Cary Sanger, Jr.
1st. Lieut. Inf.
(Formerly member of S. S. U. )

France, August 29 th, 1918.

-------------------

TRANSLATIONS OF FRENCH ROADSIGNS

Défense d'entrer.

----
Come on in, the water 's fine.
Défense de Doubler.

----
Get by as fast as you can.
Défense de fumer.

----
Who's got a smoke ?
Convois Interdit.

----
Look out for camion trains.
Attention an Train.

----
Wait twenty minutes while the man conies out and opens the gate.
Route très mauvaise pour Autos.

----
Ambulances this way.
Route Bombardée, Dangereuse pour stationnement,

----
Stick around awhile, --- the brancardiers will be along pretty soon.
Consigné par l'autorité militaire.

----
Use rear entrance.

L. W.

-------------------

NOTES FROM MALLET RESERVE

The trundling troops of trucks and the charging companies of cannons of the Mallet Réserve as we were euphoniously dubbed some time ago in the mouthpiece of the A. E. F; have certainly been trundling and charging during the past two or three weeks. Some of the speed demons who used to go down hills with the clutch out during the old A.F.S. days but who now are compelled to submit to governors are complaining of rolling so much and so far that they can't keep up with the retreating Germans with the incumbrance of a governor. As Tubby Fales, T. M. 397, sergeant in one of the companies remarked the other night, the Germans are sure goin' to get hell, if the French shot at them, all this stuff we have been hauling up. Tubby declares that war isn't what it used to be in the days when he and "General" Means, old T. M. 397, did a mile in a minute flat, trying to get away from a bombed munitions parc. Tubby who is spite of his avoirdupois outdistanced five or six Frenchmen, still tells how after the parc had quieted down and they all returned, one of the Frenchmen came up and in congratulation of his sprinting ability, patted hint on the back and said "très bien". "General" Means, by the way, is going to write to the adjutant general to find out if he is entitled to wear a wound stripe because a machine gun bullet grazed the back of his neck. He wasn't wounded but claims he lost some hair and is entitled to the stripe. The argument however that is raised among the men in the "General's" company is that if he had had a haircut he would not have lost any of his anatomy. However the question has not been decided definitely yet.

In addition to the long hours and hard work which the drivers of the trundling truck have had to contend with is the fact that everything seems to be going wrong. The other night for instance, Neville Thompson, T. M. U. 526 formerly, went out to Groupe Robinson and told the boys he was going to give a picture show. The boys hadn't had anything to remind them they lived in a civilized world for about five weeks, and imagine how they crowded around when it was rumored a picture show was about to be. They picked out the only place left in the village that had a roof on it, and then after everyone had waited about an hour, Lieut. Robinson got up and made a short speech in which he said the cinema ne marche pas ed and everyone must go to bed.

Then another thing that has been cantankerous has been the bombs. Lee Estabrook, T. M, 210, for instance, got in awful Dutch the other night because of avions. Lee it seems has been late getting around to roll call lately and has been complaining he could not cover the ground as fast as the rest of the company. However when a few bombs fell the other night he did the distance to the abri in nothing flat, and the lieutenant who lived closer to the cave and who was already there saw, and made note that there was no hindrance in Lee's running gears, whatever. However that does not compare to the 'faux pas' that Dummy Taylor, T. M. 184, made while he was down in Marseillaise on leave, along with Tom Paterson. Dummy, or-perhaps it was Tom, who is notorious for losing things, especially in the files of the American Mission, could not find the key to the room they were occupying at the hotel. Across the way was a man who Dummy figured was sure a bell-hop. He had on all the embellishments of the bellhops to which Dummy had been accustomed at home. SO :

"Dis donc," yells Dummy. No response.

"Dis donc," yells Dummy again, and then failing to get a response he goes up and slaps the individual on shoulder. "Où est la, la, la... " and Dummy stopped and made a motion like turning a key in a door.

"I do not know, I am sure", replied the man he addressed ; in English with a clear British accent.

Dummy found out after he had discovered the key that the man he yelled "dis donc" at, was an English admiral, or a naval officer of a little lower rank.

Sgt. Lawson M. Watts, and J. H. Wilkinson formerly T. M. 210 are in Aix-les-Bains on permission. Jimmy Glann, T. M. U. 133 just got back. Lt. Ray Urban, formerly T. M. 184 is also absent from his company for a few days vacation.

D. D., Réserve Mallet.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

HARRY WORTHINGTON GRAIG

Report has reached the American Field Service that Harry W. Craig was killed in action last month during an air battle. Craig joined the American Field Service in January 1917, serving six months in Section 12. He received the croix de guerre in April 1917. He returned to America and later enlisted in the U. S. Air Service and received a commission as 2nd. Lieutenant. His home was in Cleveland. Ohio and he was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin.

-------------------

NEWS FROM SECTION 626

Malcolm M. Dennison, who was in the Harvard Architectural Graduate School when he entered the Field Service in February 1917, being assigned to Section 2, has been spending a few hours in Paris and brings the latest news from 626. He was accompanied by First Lieutenant Henry W. Johnston Yale '16, who commands the Section. Among other things Mr. Dennison said:

"There are 21 of the old Field Service men still in this section. We did have 23, but two of them E. Horton Page, Harvard '18, and Benjamin F. Etter, Princeton' 17. --- have entered the artillery and are now lieutenants at the front. We have received several croix de guerre, eleven having been awarded to former Field Service men. We recently lost our excellent maréchal des logis Roger, who has gone to the French officers' training school. We have been in four attacks this summer, one man, Mackenzie, being killed and others being wounded, --- Corporal James W. Shaw, and E. D. Kendall, all formerly in the Field Service, being among the number, while J. P. Iselin was gassed. The latter was sent back to a hospital some 60 kilom. away, but asked to return and when refused by the attendant doctor, simply left of his own accord. Notwithstanding this gallant disobedience, I understand he is also to be given the croix de guerre. I may add that the Bulletins, which Lieutenant Johnstone receives regularly, are much appreciated by the men, several of whom send their numbers home."

-------------------

NEW FROM SECTION 622

Paul A. Redmond, Syracuse '14 and Section 65, now 622, is in Paris on a brief furlough. Among other things he said the other day:

"There, are over a score of old Field Service men still in this Section, including a dozen of the former Syracuse 'bunch' which originally formed one half of Section 65. Our Lieutenant, J. M. Sponagle (old Section 1) and all the 'non-coms', are former Field Service men. During the recent drive two of our men --- Leo W. Smith, Syracuse University, Raymond W. Gauger, University of Illinois --- were wounded, the first casualties since we came out here a year ago. The first named was slightly wounded and has been convalescing at Tours ; the second, who was more severely shot up, is still at the American hospital at Neuilly. Millard Upson, Syracuse '17, brought back with him from his last congé a package of books furnished by the American Library Association, which are much appreciated. We haven't as much tobacco as books, however. The Knights of Columbus sent us out recently a highly appreciated package of chocolate, etc. The American mail is coming in well, in fact it is more promptly delivered while we are 'in advance' than when we are en repos. Our food is good of course, for we have four cooks in all, --- two American and two French. Consequently we are in good health, notwithstanding the mud and the destruction around us. As regards the latter, the retreating Huns leave nothing to be desired. For instance, the other night we saw three villages burning up."

-------------------

NOTE OF THE AIR SERVICE

First Lieutenant George M. Kyle, formerly of Section 14, has been passing a few days at No. 21 before starting for America en mission.

"I was trained during three months at Avord, Cher", he remarked "by the French. There were a great many Americans there at that time, most of whom are now in the American army, and perhaps about forty at the front with the French. I myself have been a year in the French service, eight months of which were passed at the front where I did bombarding, ‘reprisal work.' I have also been doing some ‘infantry strafing' as the British say, that is flying low and shelling marching columns of troops. One day five of us suddenly pounced, for instance, on au artillery regiment camped in a field and scattered it to the four winds, killing men and horses or causing them to rush off in all directions."

Second Lieutenant George R. Young, Harvard '19, formerly of the Boston office of the Field Service, who has just finished the course at the Avord French Flying School, passed through Paris recently en route for one of the American aviation centers in France, where he will undergo further instruction. He reports that there are about fifty other former Field Service men who have finished their course at this same school during the last few months. "We American boys have only words of praise for our Avord instructors", Lieutenant Young says, "and perhaps it does not show a lack of modesty on my part to add that the instructors seemed to be pleased with us."

-------------------

AMERICANS AT FONTAINEBLEAU

Aspirant Edward S. Ingham, Rutgers, '16, formerly in T. M. U. 397 of the Camion Service then stationed in the Soissons region, has been spending a few days in Paris on the way to the front from his regimental dépôt. He graduated from the Fontainebleau Artillery School last August and has been assigned to the 15th regiment of the field artillery, which regiment received its croix de guerre fourragère some two years ago. So Mr. Ingham, left shoulder is decorated with this honorable distinction. He says:

"The school is still taking Americans. They first began to arrive about a year ago but the large rush commenced at the end of last winter. Since the beginning of this summer the school has been graduating about a score of Americans each month. At present two brigades of Americans are still there. We leave the school in French uniforms as French Aspirants, and about a month after graduation we are sent to the front and attached to a French battery, where we eventually become French second lieutenants. To attain this grade might take six months. A certain number of Americans are already lieutenants, commanding Frenchmen. Most of us remain in the French army, though there are cases of Americans being transferred to our own army. The main advantage of the transfer is higher pay. When we entered the school we were given, like our French comrades, the regular poilu pay, that is five sous a day. On graduating you get two francs a day and when you go to the front, between three and four francs. So there is more glory than cash in this career, for we get at best, only about half as much money as a 'doughboy'. The majority of the men go into the 75's, others become aerial observers and a few enter the 155's, while the tanks and the trenchmortars have also secured some of our graduates, which is largely to their credit. Perhaps I may be permitted to say to the boys who are thinking of entering the school, --- at least you should have some knowledge of French and the elements of trigonometry. These are the essentials. But no one who is really willing to work need be afraid of the course, especially as the French instructor-officers are animated with a most friendly spirit for us Americans,. The course is very thorough and the school has a wonderful equipment, while of course the historic surroundings are very inspiring and the beautiful forest offers a most healthful atmosphere to live and study in."

-------------------

NOTES

Mr. Wells Gilbert, the Northwestern representative of the American Field Service In America, was recently the guest of Mr. Henry D. Sleeper at 21 rue Raynouard. Mr. Gilbert who is now connected with the American Red Cross, was largely instrumental in providing the ambulances known as the Portland, Oregon, Unit that went out with S. S. U. 68 when the change was made from Fiats to Fords.

John R. Ellingston of old S. S. U. 10 is now a 2nd. Lieutenant in a Machine Gun Corps in the British Army.

Among the visitors at No. 21 on Sunday were the following Aspirants who have just graduated from the Ecole d'Artillerie at Fontainebleau.

R. R. Ball (S. S. U. 69)
Charles A. Blackwell (S. S. U. 64)
J. H. Chipman (T. M. U. 184)
Frank Caldwell (S. S. U. 66)
Bailey Emery (A. R. C.)
H. H. Harter (S. S. U. 70)
E. Mack Gildea (T. M. U. 133)
Edward S. Ingham (T. M. U. 397)
J. S. McCampbell (S. S. U. 69)
Henry W. Patterson (T. M. U. 133)
J. M. Parmelee (S. S. U. 27)
R. Simons (T. M. U. 184)

-------------------

SOME LITERARY NOTES

Mr. H. H. B. Meyer, Chief Bibliographer of the Library of Congress, has, at the request of the Librarian, Mr. Herbert Putnam, furnished us several fresh items for the Bibliography of the future Field Service History.

Mr. Putnam in a recent letter from Washington to us says: "The American Library Association, acting at the invitation of the War Department through its Commission on Training Camp Activities, has a library field service which is under my direction, with headquarters here at the Library of Congress. The first operations were in the training camps throughout the United States ; but we have now in operation and service in France, under the immediate conduct of Mr. Burton E Stevenson, the librarian and author, and an engaging person. This library service is a unique incident of this particular war."

For the issue of War Books, the Harvard and Yale Presses have united under the name of the University Press Association, with headquarters at 280 Madison Avenue, New York. Among the volumes issued by them, which may appeal to old Field. Service men, we would call attention to the following:

"The War of Positions." By Lieutenant-Colonel Paul Azan, the distinguished French officer who, at the Harvard Camp, trained so many of our young officers now in France. The book tells "how to win without waste." Price $ 2.25

"Handbook of Northern France." By W. M. Davis, Professor of Geography, Emeritus, in Harvard University. It describes the geographical features of France and is well supplied with maps and figures. $1.00

"French for Soldiers. " By Drs. A. F. Whitten and P. W. Long. This manual was made with the collaboration of officers of the French Army. It is thoroughly practical. 75 cents.

"Notes on Training : Field Artillery Details". By Lieutenant-Colonel Robert M. Danford and Major Onorio Moretti. This is the Campaign Edition, revised and enlarged, containing a new chapter on the corrections of Range and Deflection for variations due to atmospherical conditions and to the different temperatures of powder. It is bound in flexible khaki covers with rounded corners, to fit the coat pocket. $ 2.00

"The Diplomatic Background of the War, 1870-1914". By Charles Seymour, Professor of History in Yale College. The title sufficiently explains the nature of the book, and its success is evidenced by the fact that it is now in its seventh printing. $ 2.00

"Seven Hundred French Terms for American Field Artillerymen". By Edward Bliss Reed, Major, Yale R. O. T. C. This is a revised and enlarged edition, bound in flexible cloth with rounded corners, to fit the tunic pocket. 50 cents.

-------------------

RAPERE IN JUS

James P. Gagen, room clerk at the Waldorf, lost his French War Cross yesterday between the 125th Street and Thirty-third Street stations of the Sixth Avenue elevated.

Gagen enlisted, in the American Ambulance section in 1914, and at the defense of Verdun he and eight other members of Section 12 were cited for the French War Cross. He was wounded when a German bomb struck his ambulance, killing the three occupants of the car. He was gassed, later and lost the sight of both eyes. This was recovered by an operation in the American Hospital in Paris.

The decoration has a red and green ribbon, with gold star in the centre of the ribbon. On the reverse side of the medal are the dates, "1914-1917" in a circle, with crossed swords engraved through the circle.

The above except from the New-York Times of August 4th, is of interest. The gentleman in question spent about two months in 1917 (not 1914) in the post-office in Paris, at 21 rue Raynouard (not at the front). He was never a member of Section 12, never served in this or any other section of the Field Service at Verdun, or anywhere else on the French front. His case is not altogether unique, and we shall be glad to bring others like it to our reader's attention from time to time.

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PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. E. F. MEN.

Chauncey Richard Hood T.M.U. 133 2nd Lieut. N. A. Commanding Co. C. 10th Amm. Train 10th Div. Camp Funston, Kansas.
Jerry Thomas Illich S.S.U. 3 1st Lieut. Aviation Section S. R. C. U. S. A.
Robert Whitney Imbrie S.S.U. 14-3 American Vice-Consul, Petrograd, Russia.
Leslie P. Jacobs S.S.U. 8 Lieut. U. S. Naval Air Service, U. S. A.
Howe Burr S.S.U. 69 Seaman 2nd class, Navy U. S. Great Lakes Naval Training Station.
Gilbert R. Glorieux S.S.U. 9 Pvt. F. A. C. T. O. S. Camp Jackson, Ky.
Tom Keck S.S.U. 67 2nd Lieut. Field Artillery, U.S.A.
Lester J. King T.M.U. 397 Pvt. 1st cl. Air Service, U. S. Army, U. S. A.
William Knight, Jr. S.S.U 64 Flying Cadet, U. S. Air Service, U. S. A.
Jerome Hill Kuhn S.S.U. 29 Flying Corps, Gunnery Sergeant, Student Marine Reserve, U. S. A.
John Dutton Little S.S.U. 1 Cpl. 301st Field Sig. Battalion, A. E. F.
J. H. Loomis S.S.U. 29 2nd Lieut. 42nd F. A. Camp Custer, Mich.
Edmund T. H. Lowry S.S.U. 3 Candidate 6th Training Co. Artillery C. A. C., Fort Monroe, Va.
Charles Pinckney Luckey S.S.U. 64 Pvt. Battery F, 12 Field Artillery American E. F.
Samuel H. Paul S.S.U: 1 1st Lieut. U. S. Sig. R. C. U. S. School of Aviation, Gerstner Field, La.
Ross Henrig Penz T.M.U. 133 U. S. Receiving Ship, Naval Aviation, U. S. A.
Frederic P. Perkins S.S.U. 13 Pvt. 77th F. A. U. S. Army, American E. F.
William Prickett S.S.U. 4 2nd Lieut. 1st Aero Squadron American Field Artillery, A. E. F.
Benjamin Hay Putnam T.M.U. 184 Lieut. Aviation, U. S. Air Service, A. E. F.
Guy Huntington Richards S.S.U. 67 Pvt. Battery A, 306 F. A. American E. F.
Thomas Arnold Robinson S.S.U. 64 Cadet in Aviation, San Antonio, Texas.
William Patton Russell S.S.U. 4 A. P. O. 766. A. E. F. 2nd Lieut. Infantry,

-------------------

VISITORS AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

John R. Fisher (S.S.U 20) 1st. Lieut. U. S. A. .A. S.; A M. Hyde (S.S.U. 16 and 26) 1st. Lieut. F. A.; Powel Fenton (S.S.U. 3); 1st. Lieut. U. S. Aviation; E. English (S.S.U. 9 and 3) U. S. A. A. S.; H. Kelleher (S.S.U. 12 and 3) U. S. A. A. S.; Norman S. Buck (T.M.U. 133) U. S. Air Service; M. M. Knight (S.S.U. 27) A. R. C.; Anthony Manley (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Air Service; Walter B. Crane (S.S.U. I) U. S. A. A. S. ; Malcolm M. Dennison (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; Henry W.. Johnston 1st. Lieut. U. S. A.. A. S. ; George M. Kyle (S.S.U. 14) 1st. Lieut. U. S. Air Service ; Mack Gildea (T.M.U. 133) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie Fontainebleau ; Bennett Wells (T.M.U. 526) 1st. Lieut. U. S. Air Service; John Craig, Jr. (S.S.U. 2) Eleve Aspirant 21 brigade, Fontainebleau; William D. Swan (S.S.U. 10) 2nd. Lieut. F. A. ; Henry W. Patterson (T.M.U. 133) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; R. R. Ball (S.S.U. 69) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; J. S. McCampbell (S.S.U. 69) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie Fontainebleau ; Frank Caldwell (S.S.U. 66) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; R. Simmons (T.M.U. 184) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; Edward S. Ingham (T.M.U. 97) Aspirant, 15e R. A. C. ; Charles D. Blackwell (S.S.U. 64) Aspirant Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau ; Ray Fox (T.M.U. 133) U. S. Air Service ; Roland W. Dodson (T.M.U. 184) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; D. M. Wesson (S.S.U. 70) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau; B. P. Eldred. Jr. (S.S.U. 66) 115e brigade, Fontainebleau; Robert R. Rieser (S.S.U. 33) Italian Service A. R. C. ; Robert L. Buell (S.S.U. 15) Elève Aspirant 126e Brigade, Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontaineblean ; H. B. Harter (S.S.U. 70) Aspirant 268e R. A. C. S. P. 134 ; H. M. Hamilton (S.S.U. 69) 21e Brigade, Ecole d'Artillerie; Raymond Harper (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; Arthur Meyer (S.S.U. 14) American Ex. Co. ; Edgar J. Hearle Jr. (S.S.U. 12) U. S. A. A. S.; Harry J. Williams (S.S.U. 19) U. S. A. A. S.; J. Maxwell Smith (S.S.U. 19) U. S. A. A. S. ; A. D. McLeish (S.S.U. 10) Canadian Air Service ; J. H. Chipman (T.M.U. 184) 232e Regt. Artillerie; Jean P. Iselin (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; C. D. Bowers (T.M.U. 184) Y. M. C. A. ; Robert F. W. Moss (Chef de Parc) American Red Cross ; Roger H. Lutz (Headquarters) American Red Cross; William Howard Renfrew (T.M.U. 526) ; J. M. Parmelee (S.S.U. 27) Aspirant, Ecole d'Artillerie, Fontainebleau.

-------------------

ERRATUM In the poem "DAWN" published in our issue of September 7th, line seven should have been line nine.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

            RIVER MARNE

River Marne!
Here after four distracting years I rest
Beside thy banks, a pilgrim as it were
In penitence, remorseful for those years
I might have spent here battling by the side
Of these thy sons, whose gravemarks point at me.
Once more doth peace reign o'er these fertile fields
Which hedge thy sluggish waters, through the might
And valor of these noble sons of thine.
Spirits they are that haunt thy banks with those
Who years before them stemmed the rising tide
Of Attila in these same verdant fields.
I cannot think the thoughts that rise to me
As silenced here I stand and gaze across
Thy rural wonders, those low, castled hills,
Those fields of waving grain, those arbored nooks,
That once perhaps ensconced thy warrior sons,
And see thy placid surface rippled by
This cooling breeze that carries on its breath
The pealing chimes of yon cathedral bell,
Calling as it has called through storied years
These dwellers on thy green demesne to prayers.
Then as I watch thy green and sluggish depths
As one who gazes in some mystic crystal sphere,
The past glides by me with thy murmuring ripples.
Four years ago how little did I dream,
When all the world was startled at the roar
Of Vandal guns with which thy woods resounded,
That I one day would stand upon thy banks
And play a little part in this great cause.
And, ah, how could my wildest dreams encompass
The thought of my own country drawn within
The awful strife of this embattled world.
From this high vantage point of years I now
Can view those futile days, the life I led,
And feel no pride of action, no content,
No satisfaction as of something done.
I and my world of petty circumstance
Lay deep in that great slough of sordidness.
Half-knowing, we were blinded by the gloss
Of little honors, and material things
So that our eyes saw not the gleam of truth
The visionary glimpse of your defenders.
Now all is changed. We were not dead, thank God,
But sleeping, and our young men now have dreamed
Those dreams, and our old men have seen at last
Those visions. Here upon thy very banks
They spill their blood for that same cause so long
Sustained alone in silent heroism ---
Yes, on thy banks and in the shadow of
That ancient pile erected years ago
By Charles Martel against that age's Huns.
So may it be, may our strong sons take up
The gage of battle, pay youths' sacrifice
And if the final test of strength be on
Thy bloodstained banks or on some other stream,
So may they fight with France's veterans,
Till France and all the world at last be free,
The Hun be vanquished, and a lasting peace
Be here ordained. And may these smiling fields
So battle scarred, hear nevermore the crash
Of guns, nor bear the step of hostile arms,
And war be vanquished from the world for aye.

D. D. --- Réserve Mallet.

-------------------

       THE ENEMY RETREATS

In the weird night the lurid smoke drifts high ;
The flare of burning towns along the lines
Of the retreat illumines the dark sky,
Dreary and desolate, the river winds
Its haunted way, along its banks forlorn
A few grotesque and shattered trunks of trees
Like ghosts are standing, stark and gray and torn;
There is no sign of life, no stirring breeze,
Only the distant battle's dull refrain :
The ever-rolling rumble from afar
Of cannonading, and across the plain
The restless flashes of the guns of war.

Wm.. Cary SANGER, Jr.
1st Lieut. Inf.
(Formerly member of S.S.U. 9).

France, September 8th, 1918.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

FRED ARTHUR HANNAH

Word has just been received that Fred Arthur Hannah was killed on the 21st of September by an aeroplane bomb while serving with the United States Army Ambulance Service (Section 635). Hannah joined the American Field Service in July 1917 and served in S.S.U. 17. later enlisting in the U. S. A. A. S. Hannah was 33 years of age. His home was in Scranton, Pa.

LEON HAMLINK BUCKLER

Sgt. Leon H. Buckler died from pneumonia in a front hospital on September 23rd. Buckler joined the American Field Service in December 1916 and was a member of Section 4 until he enlisted in the United States Army Ambulance Service (Section 627) in October 1917. Buckler was 24 years of age. His home was in Rochester, New-York and he was a graduate of the University of Rochester.

-------------------

SOME LITERARY NOTES

In a recent issue we mentioned the new War Book by an old Field Service man, "An Ambulance Driver in France", by Philip Sidney Rice, formerly of Section I, but we did not give the following extract from the Preface by Major General C. B. Dougherty, of the Pennsylvania National Guard:

"As a youngster, the spirit of adventure was strong in Mr. Rice. He tried his best to break into the war with Spain in 1898 ; but his weight and heart action compelled the surgeons to reject him. Later, however, he served with credit under my command, as an enlisted man and as an officer of the Ninth Infantry, National Guard of Pennsylvania. The croix de guerre is given by France only to those who deserve it. Those who commended and recommended Phil Rice for the distinguished honor knew that in every day of his service he deserved what the French Government gave him. "

The book is written in a very pleasant style and is conspicuous for its American humor. Take this paragraph, for example:

"A thunder storm was coming on. The sound of the thunder drowned the sound of the artillery, and the rain came down in torrents. And as we lay there trying to sleep, one of my friends spoke up in the darkness and said : 'Phil, it sounds as if God in heaven is still omnipotent'. And I said 'Yes, I am glad that God in heaven is omnipotent in spite of the fact that the tent is leaking right over my face.' Then I pulled the blankets over my head and dozed off to sleep."

We feel sure that former members of Section I will approve of this paragraph, also from Mr. Rice's book :

"The men had all been wonderful. Lieutenant Reymond had been magnificent; but I am sure, but for the brainy, watchful, sympathetic leadership of William Yorke Stevenson, the Section would never have held together during those long days and nights in that seething, shrieking, blood-stained hell in front of Verdun, 'the valley of the shadow of death'."

Mr. Philip Dana Orcutt, formerly of Section 31, closes his new book, "The White Road of Mystery", with this envoi:

"The old volunteer Ambulance Service is dead, but the days we have lived with it are golden, and nothing can ever take them away from us, or bring them back again. The spirit of bonne camaraderie and intimacy which each member felt for the others; the time when, members of no army, we served with the French, on equal terms with the poilus in the trenches and the officers on the staff; when responsible to no one, we served the cause and the god Adventure, content with the past and with no thought for the morrow, --- has passed. With the coming of army discipline and system, with governmental organization and routine, the old days are gone. We are sorry, selfishly, to see them go but we cannot and would not have it otherwise. The Ambulance Service is now proudly enrolled under Old Glory, and is broader and greater than it ever could have been as a volunteer organization. We rejoice that it is so, and are proud that we have been a part of it. So, hail to the new United States Army Ambulance Corps! The men of the Ambulance salute you!"

In "Trucking to the Trenches ", by John Iden Kautz, occurs this passage in one of his home letters written from France a year ago:

"I think what we most crave are sweets and books. As for books, of course there are some here, but not the kind I like best. I've been hungry for a little touch of poetry, too. So when sometimes you feel inclined to send something, may it be one of these, please?"

Fortunately, it is no longer necessary for the American soldier at the front "craving for books " to have to write home for them, with the long delay which that means.

Among new books of interest to Field Service men, we may mention "The Russian Revolution", the Harvard University Press, one dollar ; "Army French" and "Le Soldat Américain en France", each fifty cents, the Chicago University Press, and "Vade Mecum", seventy-five cents, Brentano.

The first of these books is perhaps the best brief account of "the true inwardness " of the upheaval in Russia in which we are becoming more and interested now that we are sending an American army to this new "over there".

The three other little volumes aim to give the American soldier in France, as quickly as possible, a reading and conversational knowledge of the French language. There are a dozen or more small books of this kind. We have mentioned in the Bulletin at least a half dozen of them. As they cost but little and each presents the subject in a somewhat different way, a soldier bent on learning practical French could not do better than run through them all.

-------------------

             TO ENGLAND

Upholding, in the stormy battle-tide;
The sacred cause of Right and Liberty,
In the grim war that rages far and wide
Your forces fight to save humanity.

With your heroic allies Belgium, France,
America and Italy --- you stand
Against the tyrant's armies, and advance
In the great battles on the sea and land.

From regions near and far your men come forth,
From overseas and distant tropic shore,
From east and west and from the south and north
They come to aid you in the battle's roar:

Your British Armies fighting in the field,
Your British Navy guarding the wide path
Of the deep seas --- until the foe shall yield
Will fight to save the world from storm and wrath.

Great Britain and your allies --- side by side
You battle for the cause of Liberty,
And, at the last, upon the land and tide
To that great cause will come the Victory.

Win. Cary SANGER, Jr.
1st Lieut. Inf.
(Formerly S.S.U. ).

France. September 1st, 1918.

-------------------

NOTES

J. W. Clark (S.S.U. 3) aspirant French Artillery has just been awarded a second citation.

The following former A. F. S. men have just returned from Italy, having finished their service with the American Red Cross Ambulance Sections: Malcolm Olson (T.M.U. 184), Raymond T. Hanks (T.M.U. 133), F. M. Brunson (T.M.U. 184), J. A. Gordon (T.M.U. 184), R. Temple (T.M.U. 526B), L. H. Davidson (T.M.U. 184), D. F. Wolfe (T.M.U. 526), C. F. Roe (T.M.U. 526) and H. H. Reid (T.M.U. 526).

-------------------

LETTERS TO THE BULLETIN

Aspirant Joseph McMorrow (T.M.U. 133), a recent Fontainebleau graduate, writes from a battery at the front:

"We are all packed to advance to a new position. In fact we are continually on the move. Last night Travis Lane's (T.M.U. 133) battery moved in next to ours, but on account of Fritz continuing his 'strategique' march rearwards, Lane will have to pack up again, almost before he gets unpacked, and move on with us. I am beginning to realize what is meant by a ‘guerre de mouvement' --- a movement from blankets to the road. The packages of tobacco which were given to us by No. 21, when we left, came in mighty handy. In the first place, it paved the way into the good graces of the officers at mess. When we were out of conversational French, we passed the cigarettes or tobacco, which invariably provoked a discussion of the comparative merits of the American and French 'weed'. In fact, we have now participated in so many of these conversations that our vocabularies on this particular subject are amply sufficient to furnish us with table eloquence for ten minutes on the stretch."

Sept., 8, 1918.

       Dear Editor

I was greatly amused at J. W. C. 's outburst of injured sensibilities occasioned by the reading of some of my stuff in the ‘Bulletin'. I am not a poet, neither am I the son of a poet, and I have nothing to suffer from any harsh words directed against any of what J. W. C. has done me the honor to call songs. As a matter of fact they were neither songs nor poems, nor intended as such.

Most of the stuff I sent was scrawled out simply for my own amusement, for lack of any other kind in these ruined villages along the front, and for practice in the use of language so that I would not get entirely out of condition to describe murders, fires, political gatherings, etc., when I get home and back into news paper work again, merely this and nothing more. Be sure I never would have allowed them to get into print had I known they were to be reviewed by a critic of such discriminating and delicate taste as that of J. W. C. I would not willingly have been the perpetrator of such a crime against his sense of aesthetic fitness. And far be it from me to have ever thought of lowering the prestige and dignity of the American Field Service, as J. W. C. infers. to this latter charge I must plead not guilty, but to the charges of poor rhyming, imperfect knowledge of French pronunciation, and general ineptitude, I submit, I hold up my hands, and cry ‘Kamerad '.

In fact I wish to apologize for causing J. W. C. several moments of anguish. I can only say that I little dreamed that my stumbling verses would ever have to pass in review before for the ballad-mongers more pretentious than I, when I reflect that one day they may have to submit to J. W. C.'s approval. And yet what all uplift in public taste there will be when they have learned to do so. As I said I am only, a scribbler. I presume everyone likes to tinker with verses, and maybe even J. W. C. does. Personally I found his review illuminating on a number of perplexing points. And it occurred to me what a great aid to the young poets, and litterateurs it would be to have him give to public sight some examples of verses which would show them how to forge their own lines in conformance to the canons of perfect taste.

In regard to the thing "War" which, was the butt of most of his indignant outburst, I may say that it was simply my effort to put into rhyme a story of an actual happening which I read in a Paris paper some time ago. I disclaim any idea of ever having "sung" in the lines that resulted. However I am reminded of the lines of a poet, (whom even J. W. C. must admit to the hall of fame), about,

... just enough of learning to misquote,
A mind well skilled to forge, or find a fault,

when I re-read my stuff and try to find where 'door' is made to rhyme with 'was ', as J. W. C. says it is made to do so. As for some of the other rhymes such as 'clothes' and ' ‘knows' ; 'all’ and 'Duval ', I confess again to all overfondness for such writers as Byron, who were wont to make 'niche' rhyme with 'with', and ‘print’ rhyme with 'in it', abridged to 'in't’ and for Goldsmith, who made 'aught' rhyme with 'fault', for Pope who made 'beaux' rhyme with ‘rows', and for Tennyson, who blasphemiously made 'moves' rhyme with 'loves '. Having seen these men whose writings for some strange reason or other are still valued in school rooms, break rules, I was no doubt led to follow a bad example, and I tried to avoid too much seeking after the right word in the stubborn places. All of which I ask J. W. C. to spare in mercy, as he is strong in criticism. As for the song 'Madelone', I shall merely let J. W. C. inquire as to its newness, of some of his French comrades.

For the future I promise to be silent or at least discreet. I commend J. W. C. to his task of reviewing the work of such amateurs as I, as a great judge of literature, and defender of the American Field Service, cautioning him only against the defect of ‘not being able to see the wood for the trees '. May he prosper in his subject of criticism.'

Very sincerely yours,

David DARRAH.

Dear Editor

In a recent issue of the Bulletin, Indignant Reader "protests" against the rhyming, in one of the writer's verses, of "men" and "Amiens". He says he "can't do it in any language". Not being in possession of this vast array of linguistic knowledge, the writer feels rather humbled. He would like to explain the matter away by a few apt sentences in Spanish or Italian, or by a few chosen quotations from the original Russian or the ancient Greek. But being possessed of only one language and having but an enforced G. B. D. knowledge of another, he feels rather lost. However, if our critic is really losing sleep, let the writer hasten to suggest a very simple remedy. Simply drop the "s" from Amiens, and then pronounce the end of the word as "en", having previously added the prefix of "A-me". This is really much simpler than changing the rhyming word to "mens," as the critic's unswerving intellect would seem to suggest.

Pained Critic also protests against the remarks regarding the shutters of Amiens for the reason that "they are declared insensate merely because, though blind, they stare without hearing the sentry's tread." According to the writer's best recollection, the metaphor of "staring blindly" is frequently used, if not in "any" language, at least in the English. But then, perhaps our pedantic and matter-of-fact critic would also object to the line 'The very walls have ears." Pained Critic at the same time missed an excellent opportunity to criticize the writer for saying, "Unseeing, cold, the shutters blind stare down." Surely the shutters were not cold in May --- a very warm month. As for the sentry, whom the critic also finds objectionable, he will, for a drink of pinard, he like the shutter, and will "appear insensate, though blind", and "will stare without hearing."

On the whole we should judge that such a matter-of-fact and literal person as Pained Critic is making a mistake in subscribing to the Bulletin. What lie really wants is the Encyclopedia Britannica.

We do not know what Pained Critic can do in "any language" but in writing "American," (as we suppose he would call it!) he lets fall, in all its unintelligibility, the following gem:

"In the very early days, Franco-American, though 'novel, fresh and unhampered by tradition, was horrible enough, but even the innumerable epics of Action 3 never attained the present distortion of the French language."

We don't know anything about section 3 and its distortion of the French language, but we fervently hope that even in its very earliest days it never attained the present distortion of the English.

Sincerely,

Robert A. DONALDSON.

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AFS Bulletin Number Sixty-Five

Index