PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

        TO AMERICA

Across the ocean to the aid
Of international liberty,
In order that the world "be made
Safe for democracy",
Your armies come in numbers vast
And, where the battle storm is growing
Into the fury of the blast
Your sons are going.

Now along the battered fields
The enemy is failing back
Where the line is crushed and yields
To your intense attack
The thunder of your guns awake
The startled echoes as they follow
Where the roar and tumult shake
Hill and hollow.

Over shattered trench and road
Forward go your fighting men
Where grenades and shells explode
As they charge again,
Storming trench and fort and town,
See the beaten foe go under
When your grim barrage comes down
With its thunder.

Your far vision consecrates
The work you have set out to, do,
Glorious United States
Now you fight anew
Against the hosts of tyranny,
And you shall gain their strongest portal
And win for world-wide liberty
Life immortal.

Will. CARY SANGER, Jr. 1st. Lieut. Inf.
(formerly member of S.S.U. 9)

France, Sept. 15th, 1918.

-------------------

BELLA MATRIBUS DETESTATA

Crimson and green the poppies bloom
Canopy of a soldier's tomb
Eighteen summers, so youthful, ah,
Bella matribus detestata!

Beauty and youth and grace are hers,
Passion and lust in their hearts she stirs
Forced is her smile, so wistful, ah,
Bella matribus detestata!

Little faces so pinched and blue
Small stone cottage in ruins, too,
Dark is the past, but the future, ah,
Bella matribus detestata

David DARRAH,
Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

              CAMBRAI

(Suggested by an article of Percival Phillips
in the London Daily Express.)

                   ---

Out of the sullen mists of dawn
That clung around her blackened walls
The pale and mournful spectre rose
                      Of Cambrai.

Within the streets of th' dead town
There flitted slinking forms of grey
That filled the shadows of the squares
                      In panic.

The roaring voice of guns that cried
With flaming tongues across the skies
Spoke in an awful litany
                      Of warning.

For vengeance of the pride that lay
With Cambrai's beauty in the dust
Was creeping through the early mists
                      Of morning.

And, seen across the writhing ground
Where ebbed and flowed the battle tide,
This ghost of former glory called
                      To freedom.

While Freedom's armies stormed her gates
And free men wrote her deathless fame
In blood and flesh upon the ground,
                      She beckoned.

And wave by wave the sea of men
Swept closer to the shattered town
Until, the sullen mists of dawn
                      Were vanished.

Then vanished, too, the forms of grey
Save those inert upon the ground
That had defiled the ancient name
                      Of Cambrai.

And in their place the busy streets
Pulsated with the even beat
Of marching legions of the hosts

                      Of Freedom.

Thus onward, onward Freedom sweeps,
For out of mists of doubt and pain
The vision of a fettered dream

                      Has risen.

J. B. C. - 17/635.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

PHILIP WINSOR

Philip Winsor died at a hospital in Bassang on October 24th, as a result of grippe and its complications. Winsor joined the old Field Service section 4 in June 1917, and enlisted in the army and continued a member of that section when it became S. S. U. 627. He was twenty-five years old, a graduate of Harvard, and his home was in Weston, Massachusetts.

-------------------

GEORGE EATON DRESSER

George Eaton Dresser is reported to have been killed, while in service with the American tanks. Dresser entered the T. M. branch of the Field Service in June, 1917 and served in 526 B until November 1917, when he joined the Red Cross ambulance service in Italy, from which he subsequently passed into the American Tank Service. Dresser was 19 years of age, a student at Phillips Andover Academy, and his home was in Chicopee, Massachusetts.

-------------------

GEORGE LANE EDWARDS, JR.

George Lane Edwards, Jr., 1st. Lieut. in Motor Transport Corps was killed by a shell on the 26th of October, 1918. Edwards joined the American Field Service in May 1917 and was assigned to T. M. U. 133. He was later sent to the officers' school at Meaux and on graduation was appointed commandant adjoint of T. M. 211. In November 1917 he was commissioned 2nd Lieut. and was recently promoted to 1st. Lieut. in the Motor Transport Corps. Edwards was a student at Yale University and his home was in St. Louis, Missouri.

-------------------

The following order of the day' was issued from the. Réserve Mallet.

October 29, 1918

Général Order
      No 52

1. The Commanding Officer of the American Mission M. T. D. Reserve Mallet announces with deep regret the death of Lieutenant George L. Edwards Jr. This officer was killed by enemy shell fire while putting in safety the lives of his men on the night of October 24th 1918.

2. Lieutenant Edwards had been in this command since its inception. He was a member of the American Field Service, and enlisting in the army as a private, rose to the rank of 1st Lieutenant. He always gave the best that was in him, and was appreciated, liked and admired by all his comrades whether of higher or of lower rank. He went to his death bravely doing his duty, as becomes an American Soldier.

P. B. K. POTTER,
Captain Q. M. C.
Commanding.

-------------------

RESERVE MALLET

The following American Field Service men serving with Réserve Mallet have been commissioned 2nd. Lieut. M. T. C, as date of September 25th, 1918.

William M. Bristol Robert J. McClintock
Mayo A. Darling Donald W. Stewart
George L. Herrick Lee B. Wood
Horatio J. Harper Elbert A. Young, Jr.
John I. Kautz Raymond Young.
Wendell P. Harper.  

Promoted from 2nd. Lieut. to 1st. Lieut. M. T. C.

John C. Barker Leland E. Wells
Robert R, Black Donald B. Percy.
Gordon C. Thayer.  

-------------------

LETTERS

Extract from a letter from Rowland W. Dodson (T.M.U. 181) dated October 21, 1918.

"Chipman and. I finally reached our regiment after three days and nights of wandering up and down the countryside and of utilizing about every form of transportation except aeroplanes. The French information bureau at the railhead told us our destination, but couldn't route us. Told us to get there somehow, which we did but of course at the cost of much time and patience.

"Things started rolling a few days after we arrived and we have been on the go pretty much ever since, advancing into a beautiful green country untouched by war. Everything goes well except the rain and mud, the former keeping us and all we have damp or wet, and the latter keeping us dirty..

"The inhabitants of this country, liberated by our progression, are all smiles, and make things quite pleasant for us when we stay overnight at a farmhouse or village. It was interesting to watch the men of our battery buying milk from the old woman who owned the farm. She had evidently set a low price purposely and the men thought it too little, so there was much polite argument and passing and return of compliments.

"The Boches were forced out of this region so fast that very little has been wrecked. Some of the bigger towns show damage but as the country is mostly a region of separate farms and homesteads, the total damage is not as appalling as in parts of France. As a matter of fact, you have a better idea of how the war goes on the whole than we, as the newspapers are irregular and several days late. By the time they reach us we are usually some distance ahead of the line they indicate. I hope this will continue (that is by advancing the line and not by retarding the papers) and to all indications this seems likely up our way."

27 Batt. 3me Groupe, 232 Reg. A. C.

-------------------

Company "B", 210th Engineers
Camp Funston, Kansas, September 28, 1918.

Dear Editor,

You have been sending me copies of the weekly news of the old Field Service, and you can believe me, I am sure glad to get them. Naturally there have been many changes about which I know nothing, but there is always interesting news whether or not it is personal. My enlistment in the Field Service ended November 5th, 1917, and I started back to the dear old U.S. expecting to be back in France within the next few months, but so far "nothing doing", and ten months have already passed. I came back on the Adriatic, landing in New York on the 30th of November. On the 14th of December I enlisted as a buck private in the rear rank of Uncle Sam's Army. I was assigned to Company D, 301st Ammunition Train, at Camp Devens, Massachusetts. I put in an application to go to the Officers Training Camp, and on January 5th, 1918, I started in a long grind of sixteen weeks at the O.T.C. at Camp Devens, Mass. I was among those graduating when the course closed April 20th. Everyone who graduated was given, a Sergeant’s Warrant and sent back to his old organization. When I went back to mine I was put in as 1st sergeant for a short while, to get used to the orderly room work. On the 25th of May I was suddenly shipped to Camp Lee, Virginia, with all of the rest of the successful candidates from Devens.

When I landed at Lee I found nearly 3000 other candidates from all parts of the United States. Everyone of us was given discharge "To accept a commission", on the 31st of May. On June 1st we were all commissioned as 2nd Lieutenants in the National Army. We have all been changed since to the United States Army. I was attached to the Infantry Replacement Camp for duty until July 16th, when I was transferred to Camp Funston, Kansas.

Upon arriving here I was sent to a Platoon Commanders School, for Infantry work. Everyone at the school was a second lieutenant. We all carried packs and rifles for two weeks over these Kansas Hills in the hottest kinds of weather. After the school I was attached to the depot brigade for a while and then I was assigned to Company "C", 10th Ammunition Train, and was placed in command. I formed the company and remained in command about four weeks, when I was relieved of my assignment and attached to the 10th Motor Supply Train. I remained there about a week and was then sent up here ten days ago. I was placed in command of Company B, and that is where I am now. Yesterday I received notice that I was assigned to the 20th Infantry but would remain here until further notice. I expect that that will be changed before 1 have to report for duty with the 20th,

Camp Funston is about three miles from Fort Riley Kansas. There is a large monument a mile the other side of Riley that marks the Geographical center of the United States. The Camp is situated out in the hills and fields of Kansas, far from any town, Kansas City, Mo. 150 miles away being the nearest town of any size. The camp itself is very compact, making it necessary for the troops to go out into the hills and drill. At present we leave camp at seven thirty in the morning and don't return until four-thirty in the afternoon. Everyone takes a full pack and we eat our meals out there.

This is the only camp I have been in where there is what they call a "ZONE". This is a part of the camp that is set aside for stores and theatres. There are three theatres, one a Stock Company, another a Vaudeville, and the third a Movie. There are also large pool-rooms and ice-cream parlors, and clothing stores. That gives a pretty good variety and one can buy almost anything there.

The only F.S. man that I have seen over here was Tom Jones, now of the 37th Division, formerly of Section C, T.M.U. 526. I met him at Camp Lee, Va. about three months ago.

Give my best regards to all, and tell them that I will be there as soon as Uncle Sam will send me.

Sincerely yours,

CHAUNCEY R. HOOD (T.M.U. 133)
2nd Lieutenant, Inf. U.S.A.

-------------------

NOTES

Colonel Percy L. Jones, head of the U. S. Army Ambulance Service, has been spending a fortnight at 21, rue Raynouard, recuperating from a recent illness.

-------------------

C. Winant (S. S. U. 3) aspirant French Artillery, who was made a prisoner of war last June has escaped to Holland.

-------------------

Malcolm Olsen (T.M.U. 184) has gone to Italy with the Wynne-Bevin Ambulance Section for a short period.

-------------------

John F. Howe, formerly in T.M.U. 133, now in French Artillery recently received a croix de guerre.

-------------------

S. J. Colford has, received commission as 2nd. Lieut. U.S. Marines.

-------------------

Paul Cadman (S.S.U. 8. and T.M.U. 133) has been promoted to Captain U.S.F.A.

-------------------

Russell Davis of T.M.U. 526 who afterwards went to Italy with the American Red Cross, has returned to America.

-------------------

Dudley F. Wolfe (T.M.U. 526) has left for England to enter the U. S. Army Service.

-------------------

The following A. F. S. men have gone to the M. T. C. School at Decize.

E. C. Lawrence (S. S U. 13) P. A. Rie (S. S U. 19).
W W. McCarthy (S. S. U. 17) J. W. Shaw (S. S. U. 2).
A. G. Standing (S. S. U. 32) K. A. Wood (S. S. U. 68.)
E. D. Townsend (S. S. U. 1)  

-------------------

B. Robinson (S. S. U. 67) has gone to the Artillery School.

-------------------

L. G Smith (S. S. U. 2) and Frederic R. Colle (S. S. U. 28) have gone to the Infantry School.

-------------------

W. Howard Renfrew (T.M.U. 526) and John A. Gordon (T.M.U. 184) have joined the Artillery School at Fontainebleau.

-------------------

The Field Service Headquarters will be glad to buy and send home Christmas presents for any of its members who may wish to avail themselves of this opportunity.

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Walter Ralph Malm S.S.U. 14 Bureau of Aircraft Production, District Metallurgist, San Francisco District.
William McKinley S.S.U. 4 Student A. T. C. Lehigh University, U.S.A.
George Van Santvoord S.S.U. 8 Sgt. 39th Regt. U.S. Infantry, American E. F.
Willard D. Saulnier S.S.U. 64 Civilian Ship Construction, U.S.A.
Maxwell Carleton Shattuck S.S.U. 8 Lieut. Field Artillery, American E. F.
Victor Applegate Space S.S.U. 71 Pvt. Infantry, Camp Devens, Mass.
James Rich Steers, Jr. S.S.U. 29 Pvt. Saumur Artill. School, American E. F.
Daniel Joseph Sullivan S.S.U. 64 2nd Lieut. Aviation, Pilot, Gersner Field, La.
Roger P. Stone S.S.U. S8 Disqualified for Army Service.
William E. Van Dorn S.S.U. 2 Sgt. U.S. Air Service, England.
Wallace Nathan Wells S.S.U. 9 2nd Lieut. A Batt. 79th F. A. American E. F.
Elisha Wittlesey T.M.U. 133 Ship fitter --- Ship Building, U.S.A.
Kenneth T. White S.S.U. 4 1st Lieut. F. A. Attached to Air Service, 2nd A. I. C. A. P. O. 717.
Hawley Lester Smith S.S.U. 65 1st Lieut. Infantry, camp McArthur, Texas.
Henry P. Davison, Jr. Headqrs. 2nd Lieut. U. S. Naval Air Service.

-------------------

VISITORS AT, 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

Lansing Warren (S.S.U. 70) U. S. A. A. S.; Burnet C. Wohlford (S.S.U. 10) U. S. A. A. S.; R. W. Gauger (S.S.U. 65) U. S. A. A. S. ; James M. Irwin (S.S.U. 70) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S.; W, B. Champlin (T.M.U. 133) 2nd Lieut. M. T. C., M. T. C. School No 1 ; Junius O. Beebe (S.S.U. 30) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; Wm. T. Tapley (T.M.U. 397) 2nd Lieut. M. T. C. School No. 1; Newell W. Wells, Jr. (S.S.U. 28) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; Arthur J. Bennett (S.S.U. 8) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S.; Maurice F. Block (S.S.U. 29) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S.; Norman C. Nourse (S.S.U. 67) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; J. C. B. Moore (T. M. U. 526) 2nd Lieut. Aviation; Willard C. Jones (T.M.U. 133) Trans. Dept. American Red Cross; L. H. Davidson (T.M.U. 184) A. R. C.; C. F. Roe (T.M.U. 526) A. R. C.; H. H. Reid (T.M.U. 526) A. R. C.; Edward S. Storer (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Joseph R. Greenwood (S.S.U. 15) Capt. U. S. A. A. S.; J. T. Walker (S.S.U. 29 and T.M.U. 133) Aspirant French Artillery; Donald Campbell (S.S.U. 69) A. R. C. Italy; James H. Lewis (S.S.U. 16). U. S. A. A. S.; W. de F. Bigelow (S.S.U. 4) Capt. U. S. A. A. S.; J. R. Fisher (S.S.U. 2 and 20) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S. ; L. Buswell (S.S.U. 2) R. L. Smyth (T.M.U. 133) 261e R. A. C.

 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

--------------------

Mr. Henry Davis Sleeper has been made Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur by the French Government in recognition of his indefatigable efforts during the first three years of the war as the American Representative of the Field Service. Mr. Sleeper is now Director at the A. E. F. Headquarters, 21, rue Raynouard.

-------------------

WORK OF THE AMBULANCE SECTIONS

During the Allied advance on the Western front since September 25th the ambulance sections have been most active and many of the former Field Service sections have performed especially dangerous and arduous work under the most difficult conditions. Much of the evacuation was through devastated country where the roads were in truly terrible condition, full of shell holes and mine holes and crowded beyond belief with convoys of every description and with troops ---at times it required from one to two hours to go a distance of five kilometres.

The postes de secours were constantly being advanced and changed. As it was all new country, and new roads it required much ingenuity and initiative on the part of the Section Commanders to help establish the postes de secours and arrange the service efficiently under continually changing conditions. Naturally the drivers had to meet the same difficulties.

In the sector where my echelon was established the following old Field Service sections were working and it was largely due to their former experiences and practise that they were able to render such distinctly creditable service : S.S.U. 621, Lieutenant Westbrook (old 68), S.S.U. 623, Lieutenant Campbell (old 66), S.S.U. 626, Lieutenant Johnstone (old 2) S.S.U. 632 (old 14), S.S.U. 633, Lieutenant Ives (old 15) S.S.U. 634, Lieutenant McClure (old 16), S.S.U. 638, Lieutenant Butler (old 26); S.S.U. 639 (old 72), S.S.U. 642 (old 30). Most of these sections for several weeks had practically no cantonnement except in abris, ditches or under tents out in open country. Often every car of the section was out every night for six or eight nights running. The postes de secours had to be very close to the lines on account of the advance and the drivers were often in easy range of machine gun fire. The evacuations became continually longer as the lines advanced, as it took some time to move up the field hospitals. The work was done well, cheerfully and enthusiastically and the many citations that are to come to the men show what was thought of their work by the divisions. Every section kept every car going and the service was never interrupted.

Other Field Service officers who did equally good work with their sections were Lieutenant Fletcher, S.S.U. 517 (formerly with old 4 and 14), Lieutenant Seymour, S.S..U. 580 (formerly with old 17), Lieutenant Harding, S.S.U. 592 (formerly with old 67), Lieutenant Owens, S.S.U. 552 (formerly with old 8), Lieutenant Frantz, S.S.U. 551 (formerly with old 18), Lieutenant Kinsolving (formerly with old 4) and Lieutenant Dudgeon (formerly with old 14).

W. DE F. BIGELOW (formerly old 4)
Capt. [J. S. A. A. S.      
Echelon Américain, Parc D.

-------------------

                 TO SERBIA

First to feel the shock and storm of war,
First to hear the echoing cannon's roar,
When the savage foe came forth
From the regions of the north
To your door.

Daring, brave, indomitable land,
At the river's bank you took your stand,
Held the striving hordes at bay
Through each desperate night and day
Valiant band.

There amid the tumult and the flame,
When the battle shock against you came,
Driving back the invader's men
There you gained, time and again,
Lasting fame.

Later --- when the foe in numbers vast
Over your defensive lines swept past,
You were ever in the thought
Of your soldiers as they fought
To the last.

Though you passed through agony and pain
Losing nearly all of your domain,
You fought on, and would not yield
In the strife for town and field,
Hill and plain.

Now --- a change comes in the battle-tide;
See your men advancing far and wide,
Forward in the cause of right
With the Allies in the fight
At your side.

Though your towns are battered, wrecked and burned,
When your fields to you shall be returned,
Victor in the battle's strife,
Your brave land shall have new life,
Nobly earned.

Wm. CARY SANGER, 1st. Lt. Inf.
(formerly member of S.S.U. 9)

France, September 24th, 1918.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

WILLIAM NOBLE WALLACE

Word has reached the headquarters of the death of William Noble Wallace, formerly of Field Service section number 1. Wallace was Lieutenant in the Marines and is reported to have been killed on October 9th. He served with Section 1 from June until November 1916. He was 23 years of age, a student at Yale and his home was in Indianapolis, Indiana.

-------------------

FREDERIC MOORE FORBUSH

Word has just been received of the death of Frederic Moore Forbush in Philadelphia, October 6th. Forbush was a member of old section 8 from April until October 1916. With the outbreak of the war he entered the navy and in this service he had made ten round trips on transports from America to France and return. His death was caused by pneumonia. Forbush was 21 years old and his home was in Detroit, Mich.

-------------------

COMMANDANT MALLET'S TRIBUTE TO LIEUT. EDWARDS.

The Chef d'Escadron Commanding the Reserve, regrets to announce the death of Lieutenant Edwards of the American Army, commanding Company "C" of section-groupe T. M. 251, on the field of honor October 24, 1918,

Following the unloading of a transport in the region of L...; part of his company underwent a violent bombardement. Lieutenant Edwards immediately hastened to the point of danger. After having directed the personnel and the material to a place of safety, he wished to go over the bombarded road once more to make sure that none of his men had remained there. It was at this moment that he was hit by a shell and so badly wounded that he expired at the hospital of G.. , without having recovered consciousness.

Lieutenant Edwards has been serving France for 17 months. It was in the month of May 1917, that he joined the Reserve as a volunteer in the American Field Service. He was enlisted in the American Army on the first of October of the same year and received his commission as an officer in the month of January 1918.

His commanders lose, in losing him, a capable and conscientious officer, his comrades a true friend, his men an excellent Commander.

All will cherish a stirring remembrance of this noble victim of the great Allied cause for which he fell.

-------------------

MEDAILLE MILITAIRE

William Pearl (S.S.U. 1) has just been awarded the médaille militaire by the French Government. Pearl was severely wounded on the 17th of August, 1917, in the region of Verdun. Although he has not as yet recovered the full use of his arm he is engaged as a civilian worker with the United States Army. He has already been decorated with the croix-de-guerre (two citations).

-------------------

LETTERS TO THE BULLETIN

To the Editor of the Bulletin:

Old Four has left another of its members on French soil and with his burial a bit of each one of us was interred with him. Phil Winsor died on October 24 in a French hospital of complications of the grippe. He was buried the following day with the military honors of an American officer. An American General was at the ceremony, an American played "taps" and American infantry fired the last salute. The section did not learn of its loss until two days after the funeral, when it came as a sobering shock.

Winsor served in the Paris Service of the American Ambulance Field Service early in the history of the service. He came over again in June, last year, and has been in this section since July 7, 1917. He was beloved by all the fellows, and his loss is one that will be constant.

-------------------

R. W. Westwood, S.S.U. 627 (old 4).

Extract from a letter from Hugh Wilson MacNair (S.S.U. 65) from A. R. C. Military Hospital No. 1:

"Due to the wrath of the Hun, the destructive quality of steel, and existing circumstances I find myself on my back in bed. In fact Fritz was so inconsiderate as to get me in the leg whereupon an amputation was necessary.

"After spending my time in a French hospital from October 5th until yesterday, 20th, I was sent here at Neuilly. Please tell any of the 622 men who pass thru to come to see me."

-------------------

TO AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE BULLETIN

Referring to your issue No. 68 of October 26th, will you kindly give us details that will enable us to investigate the statements made in the article entitled " Nocturne in E Minor?"

It is not and never has been the policy of the Y. M. C. A. to make a distinction between officers and enlisted men in respect to the amount or kind of service. At the request of the Army authorities special clubs, messes, and buildings have, at many points, been set aside for the exclusive use of officers but at the same point there will always be found a similar kind of service for the enlisted men. In this connection we would refer you to General Order 45, Headquarters of S. O. S., September 25th, 1918.

H. F. Sheets,
Associate Chief Secretary.
Y.M.C.A.

-------------------

NOTES

W. Clarkson Potter (S.S.U. 1) 1st Lieut. U. S. Air Service is reported missing.

1st Lieut. William H. Wallace (S.S.U. 4 and 28) has been promoted Captain U. S. Air Service. He is at present on detached service with Motor Transport Reserve, 1st American Army.

The following former American Field Service men have been commissioned 2nd Lieutenant U. S. Sanitary Corps attached to U. S. Army Ambulance Service.

J. O. Beebe S.S.U. 30 N. C. Nourse S.S.U. 67
N. W. Wells S.S.U. 28 J. M. Irwin S.S.U. 70
A. J. Bennett S.S.U. 8 E. H. English S.S.U. 4
M. F. Block S.S,U. 71 T. J. O'Brien .S.U. 15

-------------------

PROFOND AND BEWILDERED MEDITATION
indulged in by
Reginald Vincent Spottiswoode II. Harvard ‘20

Back in Boston my low-hung Mercer was one of the brightest spots on Tremont Street every Saturday afternoon. My garage bill, as I remember, assumed rather prodigious proportions, but it spared me the trouble of looking under the hood for two years.

Now I am conducting the dubious destinies of that which is known as a Ford ambulance. My mechanics paws wear the conventional mourning. I can change a tire in a foot of mud and retain my composure when the car rolls off the jack and on to my foot. I know a commutator from a carburator, a knock from a miss.

In Cambridge I wore an antique brown hat, a shaggy fur coat, the bill for which put me at outs with the head of the house for a month, a pair of overshoes that flapped and clanked where ever I went and an exuberant vest that would put a Matisse landscape or the camouflaging on a 380 to shame.

At present I am displaying my somewhat angular proportions in the humble garb of a buck private, the same as some four million others. My sole touch of individuality is a liver-like coat sans sleeves.

Not so very long ago I could smoke no cigarette but Benson and Hedges. I knew the weak and the strong points of every cuisine in town. No less than twenty bartenders knew me as "Reggie"; Highball John gave me his photograph. Charley Wirth at one time considered the proposition of naming a cocktail after me.

Yesterday I suffocated for two hours in front of a Co-op, trying to buy a package of Blue Caporals. When I get stuck out ten miles from nowhere with a boîte de singe, a piece of cold fish and a crust of bread I'm now able to make a passable meal thereof. I carry a collapsible cup in my hip pocket now, so that when some brancardier flourishes a bidon of pinard I shan't lose out.

There was once a time when I could get away with tea at the Copley, when the third from the end at the Follies could see me and my Mercer, when, in short, I was something of a wag with the wenches.

Just now I find that the wooden-shoed, cotton-stockinged, calico-dressed, slatternly-hatted village mag at the corner café looks like the Queen of Sheba.

Back in Randolph I developed an accurate wing, throwing my shoe at the unfeeling person who woke me at eight-thirty every morning.

And over here, some strange change has come about --- for I'm beginning to feel it a privilege to be awakened in the middle of a black night to carry some silent, suffering Frenchman who has done more for his country than I have ever done for mine.

Back in Boston I often noticed the scurrilous glances of the mob, the passing slurs of the herd, the side whispers of "lily" and "Percy" and "wheat", (evidently referring to me).

Last week I received a letter from my Aunt Harriet. She's a proper soul, altogether too narrow and rockbound, --- and she never had much use for me. In her letter she said that this war was "making a man of me". And despite her restricted outlook on life, her ingrained New Englandism, I think perhaps Aunt Harriet is right.

Its all very puzzling.

Gno Lbo.

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Chester R. Tutein T.M.U. 526 2nd Lieut. Air Service, American E. F.
Hamilton Martin Warren T.M.U. 133 2nd Lieut. U.S. Army Camp Grant, Rockford, Ill.
Sherman Leland Whipple, Jr. T.M.U. 184 Pvt. S. A. T. C., Harvard.
Berkeley Wheeler S.S.U. 27 Treasurer, Industrial Service, U.S.A.
Clement Baldwin Wilcox T.M.U 37 Sgt. Tank Corps, Co. B, 328 B'tn. American E. F.
Harry L. Williams S.S.U. 26 A. R. C. Ambulance Service in Italy.
Francis Thayer Hobson T.M.U. 133 Pvt. D Co. 2nd Machine Gun B'tn, American E. F.
Gordon Edward Howland S.S.U. 16 Chief Yeoman, Supply Of flee, War College, Newport, R. I.
Anson Jesse Ives, Jr. S.S.U. 68 Flying Cadet, Air Service, U.S.A.
Robert Treat Knowles S.S.U. 13 Field Artillery, O. T. S. Camp Taylor, Ky.
Austin Blake Mason S.S.U. 8 1st Lieut. Air Service Military Aeronautics.
Herbert D. Miller T.M.U. 184 Instructor of War Work, Tufts College, U.S.A.
James Knox Miller S.S.U. 64 Cadet, Aviation. Camp Dick, Dallas, Texas.
John Emery Minty S.S.U. 17 Chief Quartermaster, Naval Aviation, Dunwoody Institute.
Ogden Nevin S.S.U. 1 U. S. A. A. S., S.S.U. 504.
Joseph Weir Sargent S.S.U. 64 2nd Lieut. F. A. 17. S. A.
George W. Scribner, Jr. S.S.U. 26 Not in Service.
Luther Ashton Wait T.M.U. 526 Not in Service.
N. P. Stewart T.M.U. 184 2nd Lieut. Tank Corps, Camp Tobyhanna, U.S.A.
James Irwin Taylor S.S.U. 8 Chief Q. M. U. S. Naval Aviat. Department, Akron, Ohio.
James S. Taylor S.S.U. 3 Construction Engineer, Emergency Fleet, U.S.A.
Russell W. Tapley S.S.U. 1 U.S. Aviation. U.S.A.
Frederick John Thieme, Jr. S.S.U. 69 Pvt Co. 7, Engineers, Camp A. A. Humphreys, Va.

-------------------

VISITORS AT, 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

Edward N. Seccombe (S.S.U. 2) U . S. A. A. S.; Thomas J. McGowan (S.S.U. 16); Archibald E. Lewine (S.S.U. 8) U. S. A A. S.; Walter Humphreys (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S.; Ewen Maclntyre Jr. (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; J. R. Fisher (S.S.U. 2 and 20) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S.; T. M. Brunson (T.M.U. 184) Fontainebleau ; James W. Harle (S.S.U. 10) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; Edward S. Storer (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Douglas M. Smith (T.M.U. 526) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau; B. P. Eldred, Jr. (S.S.U. 66) 115e Brigade Fontainebleau; Frederick Lester Sexton (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S.; R. T. Hanks (T.M.U. 133) 59° Brigade, Fontainebleau; Edward D. Kneass (S.S.U. 10) Fontainebleau; Robert F. W. Moss (Chef de Parc) American Red Cross; J. Timothy Walker (S.S.U. 29 and T.M.U. 133) Asp. French Artillery; W. de F. Bigelow (S.S.U. 4) Capt. U. S. A. A. S.; Edward W. Kane (S.S.U. 28) U. S. Naval Aviation; Walter K. Varney (S.S.U. 14) U. S. A. A. S.; Robert A. Dole (T.M.U. 526) U. S. Air Service; Willard C. Jones (T.M.U. 133) ; J. H. Eastman (S.S.U. 14) 1st Lieut. 94th Aero Squadron; H. E. Adams 1st Lieut. American Red Cross; R. L. Smyth (T.M.U. 133) 261e R. A. C.; John F. Howe (T.M.U. 133) Aspirant French Artillery; James O. Beebe (S.S.U. 30) U. S. A. S.; A. J. Bennett (S.S.U. 8) U. S. A. A. S.; C. E. McCreedy (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; N. C. Nourse (S.S.U. 67) U. S. A. A. S. ; M. F. Block (S.S.U. 71) U. S. Â. A. S.; N. W. Wells (S.S.U. 28) U. S. A. A. S.; J. M. Irwin (S.S.U. 70) U. S. A. A. S. ; Leslie Buswell (S.S.U. 2); August A. Rubel (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Donald Ordway (T.M.U. 242) 1st Lieut. M. T. C., Mallet Reserve; Richmond Ordway (T.M.U.242) 1st Lieut. M. T. C., Mallet Reserve; M. M. Knight (S.S.U. 27) Fontainebleau; Robert R. Reiser (S.S.U. 33) Fontainebleau; Robert L. Buell (S.S.U. 15) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau; Ned Bell (T.M.U. 133) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau; J. R. Greenwood (S.S.U. 15) Capt. U.S.A. A. S.

 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

November 11, 1918.

THE GREAT WORLD DRAMA IN WHICH WE HAVE BEEN PRIVILEGED TO TAKE OUR PART HAS ENDED. THE VAST ARENA IS FOREVER SILENT. FRANCE, ONCE MORE CROWNED WITH BATTLE GLORY, HAS BECOME AGAIN THE "DOULX PAYS" OF GENTLE TRADITION. OUR COUNTRY. TOO, ON THE SOIL OF FRANCE HAS BEEN REBORN. IT IS A NEW ERA IN THE WORLD'S HISTORY UPON WHICH WE ARE ENTERING. IT IS A NEW AMERICA TO WHICH WE SHALL RETURN. WE, WHOSE FORTUNE IT IS TO HAVE LIVED DURING THESE IMMORTAL HOURS WILL NEVER LOSE WHAT WE HAVE GAINED IN MEMORIES AND INSPIRATION. LIKE FRANCE, IN THE WORDS OF CLEMENCEAU, "DIGNE DE LA GUERRE" --- MAY WE ALSO BE "DIGNE DE LA PAIX."

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

RICHARD VARION BANKS

Word has been received that Richard Varion Banks was killed in a motor truck accident near Nancy about ten days ago. Banks joined the service in June 1917 and was in T.M.U. 526 of the Camion Branch. He was released in November 1917 to join the U.S. Air Service. Banks was 24 years of age, was a student at Rensselaer Polytechnic, and his home was at Ossining, New York.

-------------------

LEON H. DONAHUE

I am sorry indeed to send for your records the news of the death of Leon H. Donahue of Gloucester, Massachusetts. He came originally to the Field Service in September 1917 and afterwards enlisted in the U. S. A. A. S.

The service has lost a very faithful soldier and the section a very loyal comrade. He is and will continue to be missed. In this busy, changing life there is perhaps no better tribute that could be paid.

J. G. B. CAMPBELL,
S. S. U. 623 (old 66).

-------------------

WHY NOT?

The Bulletin depends upon its readers for its contributions. Whether or not it is interesting and in fact whether or not it shall continue to exist depends upon you and not upon « 21 ».

Those of you who are to have the privilege of forming part of the armies of occupation are destined to have experiences unlike any that have gone before. During the coming weeks, too, you are going to have more leisure than you have had during these last six months of surging, battle. Why not use some of the idle hours in putting into words some of the scenes of which you have been witnesses and so add to the present and future interest of these columns. Why not?

-------------------

LITERARY LETTERS

Dear Editor,

I was both pained and surprised to read in a recent issue in your publication a wild effusion on a play by Wm. MacFee--- pained with Mr. Barrett and surprised at you. I am rather inclined to agree with the ideas of a certain "J. W. C. " about the standards you ought to maintain not that I dare to criticise poetry --- in your paper, which is supposed to represent an old and honorable institution, the American Ambulance Field Service, and later the American Field Service.

I think you ought to discriminate, Mr. Editor. You should never have allowed Mr. Barrett's letter to appear in its present form, How much better it would have been to have inserted a little notice informing all whom it may concern that Mr. Barrett heartily recommends Mr. MacFee's late play, "Aliens? " Never, even in the days when we bought "Boys of "76". and "Wild West" --- you remember those good old days, don't you, Mr. Editor --- have I encountered such an "ensemble " of obscurity of thought, bad grammar, and poor diction.

Can any one explain to me what that first sentence, what that first paragraph means? I admit I don't know and neither do you. In the second paragraph we are lead breathlessly up to a climax ; then the author rudely drops us into space. I never will forgive him for having left me, suspended there by my fingers until I grew weary and fell off disconsolately, to find myself in the quagmire of the third paragraph. I am irresistibly lead to the inference that this is the first modern play Mr. Barrett has read. Who on earth goes around preaching to us that there is only one "style" in existence and that to be found only in the works "of our literary fathers?" This is a base libel on jut modern intelligence. Mr. Barrett makes the world-old mistake in thinking he is the first to have made a certain discovery that there is such a thing as modern style. Let Mr. Barret buy --- or if he can't find one I will send it to him --- a copy of Mr. Arnold Bennett's Books and Persons " and he will find that the said author has also made Mr. Barrett's discovery, as far back as May 27, 1909, as evidenced by his essay on Meredith. As for the fourth and last paragraph --- well! I give up! Will. anybody tell me if they have ever read a play that was not written in the "conversation method."

Your time is limited, Mr. Editor; so I will try to be brief. Elementary grammar teaches us certain fundamentals about a sentence, and although in certain cases exceptions are allowable, I refuse to consider the second sentence in the second paragraph one of these cases. Then in the fourth paragraph the author begins "The author --- play" and then --- Mr. Editor, I cry out against this torture of our poor old English language --- he starts his next two sentences with a subjectless verb. Why not substitute commas for the periods and make the three all one sentence, which would be proper English, anyway, even though a bit complex?

As for diction, all I can say is that I have never seen characters of a play "operated." One operates a coal mine, or a doctor operates, but only in Punch and Judy shows do they "operate" characters. Mr. Barrett is a confirmed disciple of progress, I infer, but I will wager a sou against a Boche helmet that he does not find such spelling as "thoroly" and " "thru" in his beloved "Aliens." This is a guess, for I have not read the book, but, however, I am willing to take a chance.

Finally, all I have gotten out of Mr. Barrett's rather lengthy diapason. of praise is that we should all read this marvellous play, which I hope to do in, the near future, with the kindly help of Brentano's.

H. K.,
S. S. U. 627 (old 4).

-------------------

Dear Editor,

I just finished reading a dissertation on the Field Service, entitled "Trucking to the Trenches", emanating from John I. Kautz, former member of the service, and I suggest that J. W. C. or L. W. get busy. Here's a chance in this book for some wonderful knocking. Not on the rhythm, punctuation, diction, proofreading, or farfetched, sentiment contained, but in the facts.

Kautz remarks casually in one chapter that an arm he hurt cranking a car was about well and he expected shortly to go back to the trenches. If anyone in the old camion service ever got to the trenches, as I remember it, it was because he was drinking, not wisely but too well, and even then I remember no instances of it. The only trip to the trenches that was actually such, was a little escapade of two friends of mine, Harold French and John B. Fletcher, who left their camion alongside a road and hiked up the line one night. They only got as far as the second line of trenches however and got pinched there.

Kautz also. speaks about men coming in after having stopped spent rifle balls with their tin derbies. Now I wonder why he made the number so low. Every man in the camion service can show you a nick either in his helmet or in the camion he drove that was done by enemy shrapnel. Again with regard to casualties. Kautz says that only a few men of his section are disabled by wounds. He throws the statement aside as hardly worth mentioning in the next sentence by the casual explanation that they are only flesh wounds and the sufferers from them will soon be back to duty. Now there may have been a number of men with light flesh wounds in Kautz section but it does not stand to reason that there were, everything considered, from the fact that almost everyone in the cannon service who ever got wounded was cited in army orders and given a decoration. As far as official reports go on the other hand the only two men who were ever wounded by enemy fire were Thompson and Lamont.

But the crowning opportunity for L. W. or J. W. C. lies in Kautz reference to what he was about to send his orderly out to do for him. Now, all of its will admit that the old Field Service days were the great days, but never at their palmiest zenith do I or any of the former members I have been able to consult, remember anyone being assigned a personal orderly, not even those of us who held the rank of brigadier, which Kautz says he held and which he explains was higher than the similar rank in the infantry or artillery.

We all like to throw the bull and each has a brand of his own but this bull of Kautz to an audience of camion drivers amuses but does not impress, and so I wish you would "sic" J. W. C. and L. W. on him.

D. D.,
(Mallet Reserve).

-------------------

EXTRACTS FROM PERSONAL LETTERS

John W. Ames (S.S.U. 2) aspirant in French Artillery, wrote from Aix-les-Bains, November 7, 1918:

"I was wounded in the right forearm and hand just a month ago. I got caught in a little hole near the battery by a volley of 77s and they came so thick for a few minutes that I did not dare move and one landed right beside me getting me from the elbow down and chewing up about half my right hand. I was lucky as it was I guess, but if my choice had been asked I would have preferred having it in the left hand. After spending a week in a perfectly fierce little hospital near the front I was shipped down here in a freight car and here am pretty well fixed up. it is a good hospital and the surgeon is a corker, which is the main thing. He is going to operate on me in a few days and try to give me the use of what is left of my hand and arm. Then I probably have another month ahead of me before being well so that I hope I may be able to get up to Paris for Xmas. "

-------------------

Aspirant J. Timothy Walker, Jr. (T.M.U. 133) writes on November 9th:

"It hardly seems possible, yet it is quite evidently, true that it is not raining, but is in fact a very beautiful day. Think of it, a day not only without rain, but actually the sun! As the Lieutenant says surely it is the end of the war, when we have good weather in Belgium.

"I wish you could have seen how pleased the sous-officiers were with the carton of Bastos cigarettes from the old Field Service. It so happened they were almost entirely out of tobacco, and so the cigarettes were really a gift from leaven. They asked me to thank you, so you will please consider this the formal thanks and appreciation of the sous-officiers of the quatrième batterie."

-------------------

Another old ambulancier, J. W. H. (old 2 and 10) writes as follows:

"I am sitting in my ambulance and I must tell you about the little bug that has made his home somewhere in my coat. He is the cutest little fellow I ever saw. Whenever I have nothing to do I can always find him in where the sewing is. The other day I was looking for him and I thought I felt two of them, but I guess I was mistaken. It is nice to think a little fellow (like this one is) will have a warm place to spend the cold winter. And you need never think I am all alone. It gets pretty cold over here but I know he will keep warm. And when the shells go screeching overhead I wonder what would become of him if I were killed. But I guess he must take the same chances as I do. The other day when 1 was scratching for I must have the hives or something, one of the fellows in the section told me to get some queer named salve and rub on myself. So I did and it is just fine for little Eustace. He is getting much larger and very fat. 1 am sure he likes the salve. But my itching doesn't get any better, yet I think it will soon. It is no fun to itch and scratch all night, and besides I am afraid to disturb little Eustace. If I could take off my clothing he would not he disturbed. Otherwise I am alright."

-------------------

X writes

"I saw a train of wounded arrive few days ago, and among the French wounded being carried out was a- man whom I recognized. He was an American, Van Duzer Burton, formerly member of Sections 13 and 8 of the American Field Service. He had been badly wounded twice in the leg and was also gassed. I have been told that he had been decorated for bravery. He was serving with the --- Artillery with the --- Division of Cavalry and has been in the French army since February. Burton was physically, disqualified from the American army and was a former member of a squadron of New-York cavalry."

-------------------

NOTICES

The Field Service Headquarters will he glad to buy and send home Christmas presents for any of its members who may wish to avail themselves of this opportunity.

-------------------

Owing to the increasing number of weekly visitors at headquarters, the Field Service has rented two apartments, one at 16 rue Raynouard, and the other at 3, Square Raynouard, opposite 21. These apartments are for former members of the Field Service who are now officers in the U. S Army, and who, when in Paris, may care to stay at headquarters, but may be glad to have special comforts and conveniences. A caretaker is employed for these two apartments, who, on request, will get breakfast, or, if notice is given in advance, will be glad to arrange for private lunch or dinner in the dining rooms. The rates for single rooms in these apartments are 8 francs a day. Meals, of course, can always be had at headquarters across the street.

Any officers who may care to take advantage of this new arrangement, may have rooms reserved for them by notifying the headquarters as far in advance of their coming as possible.

-------------------

The Rockefeller Commission for the Prevention of Tuberculosis in. France is interested in securing some American Personnel in the way of ; (1) Chauffeur-mechanicians, preferably between 25 and 35 years of ago, who can drive a truck, operate a motion picture machine and set up and demonstrate health exhibits, in connection with travelling lecture outfits, which this Commission is now operating in several departments in France ; (2) they are also interested in securing some Americans, preferably between 30 and 45 years of age, who have a good command of French, to serve as Directors and Lecturers for these travelling educational outfits. The work will probably last for three to five years, and the Commission will probably not be interested in employing either lecturers or mechanicians for less than one year.

If any member of the old Field Service should be interested in making inquiries regarding the salary or other particulars, he may communicate direct with Mr. Warren H. Booker, 12, rue Boissy-d'Anglas, Paris.

-------------------

NOTES

Robert P. Lamont, Jr. T. M. U. 133-F who returned to America in December 1917 after being seriously wounded in the battle of the Chemin des Dames was married on October 29th to Miss Jean Hopkins at Winnetka, Ill.

The following Aspirants in French Artillery are going to an Artillery Observation School:

Harry W. Patterson (T.M.U. 133).
Frank Caldwell (S.S.U. 66).
Robert Hyman (T.M.U. 242).
R. Simmons (T.M. U. 184)

-------------------

COMMISSIONS IN U. S. A. A. S.

Lieut. H. A. Webster (S.S.U. 2) has been promoted to Captain, Sanitary Corps.

The following members of the old Field Service ambulance sections have recently been commissioned 1st Lieutenant U. S. A A. S.:

Louis M. Quirin (S.S.U. 65). -
Bertrand E. Tremblay (S.S.U. 66).
Walter J Gores (S.S.U. 70).
Robert R. Jewett (S.S.U. 72).
George L. Wilson (S.S.U. 69).
Russel H. Potter, Jr. (S.S.U. 28).
Jack D. King (S.S.U. 71).
Gurnee H. Barrett (S.S.U. 32).
Ewen Maclntyre (S.S.U. 2).
Carl A. Randau (S.S.U. 14 and 10).
Roger A. Burrell (S.S.U. 14).

This makes the total of American Field Service men serving as officers with the United States Army Ambulance Service as follows

U. S. A. A. S. Lieut. Col

1

  Major

1

  Captains

3

  1st Lieutenants

61

Sanitary Corps Captain

1

  1st Lieutenant

1

  2nd Lieutenants

  8

  Total

76

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

John Clifford Hanna T.M.U. 133 U. S. A. A. S., S.S.U. 635.
Robert Matter S.S.U. 3 Ensign, U. S. N. Aviation Force, Paris.
Alvin R. May S.S.U. 71 Pvt. B. H. 26, Hospital Corps, A. E. F.
Logan T. Mc Nemeny S.S.U. 2 Capt. Aviation Section. A. E. F.
Philip Sumner Page T.M.U. 537 Ensign Naval Aviation, U.S.A.
Horace Wentworth Shepard S.S.U. 30 Officers Training School Camp Meade, Maryland.

-------------------

VISITORS AT, 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

Daniel Gale Turnbull (S.S.U. 66) U. S. A. A. S. ; James W. Harle (S.S.U. 10) Sgt. U. S. A. A. S. ; Aubrey L. Thomas (S.S.U. 8 and 13) U. S. A. A. S. ; M. T. Block (S.S.U. 29) 2nd Lieut. San. Corps ; Edward Samuel Jr. (S.S.U. 18) U. S. A. A. S.; Henry B. Warren S.S.U. 18) U. S. A. A. S. ; Chas. H. Griesa (S.S.U. 2) 1st Lieut. 356th Infantry; Lawrence C. Ames (S.S.U. 68) 2nd Lieut. Air Service; Harold B. Willis (S.S.U. 2) ; A. H. Manley (T.M.U. .526) U. S. A. S.; Benjamin O. Jacobsen (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S. ; Willard C. Jones (T.M.U. 133) A. R. C. Marseilles; Vernon E. Caughell (S.S.U. 10 and 14) U. S. A. S.; Thomas R. Tarrant (T.M.U. 526) U. S. A. S. ; Edwin H. English (S.S.U. 4) U. S. A. A. S. ; Arthur M. Dallin (S.S.U. 1) 178 Reg. A. T., 38e Batterie ; B. V. Emery (A.R.C.) 25e Btn. Chars Legers; Benjamin C. Tower (T. M. Camp) 101st. F. A. ; David L. Garratt (S.S.U. 66) 32° R. A. C., Fontainebleau ; Erwin L. Egger (S.S.U. 13) 17e Batt. 120 Regt. A. L.; F. D. Ogilvie (S.S.U. 2) British Red Cross.

Among the recent visitors at "21" were the following Elève Aspirants from Fontainebleau:

K. C. Wesley (S.S.U. 69). Richard Temple (T.M.U. 526).
H. D. Wood (S.S.U. 69). Clarence E. Roe (T.M.U. 526).
D. J. Post Jr. (S.S.U. 9). Raymond Hanks (T.M.U. 133).
John A. Gordon (T.M.U. 184). Fred. P. Goodrich (S.S.U. 12).
L. H. Davidson (T.M.U. 184). G. E. Rehm (S.S.U. 12).
Francis C. Jones (T.M.U. 133). Douglas M. Smith (T.M.U. 397).
David M. Wesson (S.S.U. 70). M. E. Dickerman (T.M.U. 184).
Charles H. Fabens (T.M. U. 526.) Raymond H. Fussell (T.M.U. 397).
B. P. Eldred Jr. (S.S.U. 66). Henry M; Hamilton (S.S.U. 69).
Francis P. Nash (T.M.U. 397). Edward D. Kneass (S.S.U. 10).
John R. Craig, Jr. (S.S.U. 2). Charles F. Adams.

 

 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK AT 21, RUE RAYNOUARD

PARIS

Subscription Rates

Three Months

Fr 2,00

Civilians by post

Fr. 2,75

Six Months

4,00

"      "       "

5,50

-------------------

NOTICES

A Thanksgiving Dinner will be served at 21 rue Raynouard on Thursday, November 28th, at 7 P. M. It is hoped that all former Field Service men in Paris will be able to attend. The price of the dinner will. be 8 francs. Accommodations being necessarily limited members will not be able to bring guests.

-------------------

The Field Service Headquarters will be glad to buy and send home Christmas presents for any of its members who may wish to avail themselves of this opportunity.

-------------------

IN MEMORIAM

PHILIP NEWBOLD RHINELANDER

Word has been received through the American Red Cross at Berne informing us of the death of Lieut. Philip N. Rhinelander of the 20th Aero Squadron, who was reported missing in action last September.

Rhinelander joined the American Field Service in July 1916 and went out to Section 9. He volunteered in December to go to the Orient with Sec. 10 where he remained until July 1917. He then was released to go into Aviation. He was 22 years old, a student at Harvard and his home was in Lawrence, Long Island.

-------------------

WALTER L. SAMBROOK

Word has just been received that Walter L. Sambrook died in Paris on September 9th, 1918. Sambrook joined the Field Service August 12th, 1917, being attached to T. M. U. 397 until November 13th, when he enlisted in the U. S. Army. He was a student at the University of Syracuse, 24 years of age, and his home was in Watervliet, New-York.

-------------------

ALEXANDER B. BRUCE

Word has also been received that Lieut. Alexander B. Bruce, formerly of T. M. U. 526 American Field Service, was killed in August, 1918, in the U. S. Air Service. Bruce was 24 years of age, and his home was in Lawrence, Massachusetts.

-------------------

LIEUTENANT BOUDOUY

Word has just reached the Bulletin that Lieutenant Boudouy died at the front, after a short illness, of grippe. Lieutenant Boudouy had long been associated with the Field Service. He was the French officer of Section 14 from the time it went out until it was taken over by the U. S. Army. He remained with the Section afterwards, only lately transferring to another branch of the automobile service. His interest in this section and in the Field Service will always be remembered by the many friends he made among the American Volunteers.

-------------------

COMMISSIONS FOR OLD A. F. S. MEN

The following old Field Service men have been commissioned 2nd Lieut. M. T. C.

These men were serving with the U. S. A. A. S. and owing to their experience and capacity in that service were given commissions in the Motor Transport Corps.

Arthur B. Belden (S.S.U. 68).
Walter D. Carr (S.S.U. 66).
Harwood B. Day (S.S.U. 1).
Norman J. Kann (S.S.U. 12).
Joseph B. Keyes (S.S.U. 16).
Albert J. Magnus (S.S.U. 20).
Elmer Naslund (S.S.U. 31).
William H. Richards (S.S.U. 17)

M. L. Hanavan formerly of T. M. U. 397 has just been commissioned 2nd Lieut. Motor Transport Corps.

C. Freeborn (S.S.U. 2) has been promoted to Captain Intelligence Section.

Philip T. Sprague (S.S.U. 8) has been promoted to 2nd Lieut Chemical Corps.

C. Baird (S.S.U. 2 and 3) has been promoted to Captain F. A.

-------------------

CITATIONS AND DECORATIONS

The following old A. F. S. men (S. S. U. 30) are among the members of S. S. U. 64'2 who have received citations in Divisional Orders of the French Army for their courage in action while carrying on the evacuation of the wounded of the division to which their section has been attached: Privates 1st. class John Brook, Francis D. Corman, Harold G. Crawford, Charles W. Love and Philip R. Palamountain.

First Lieutenant Martin S. Owens, commanding S. S. U. 552; formerly of S. S. U. 8, has been cited in Divisional Orders of the French Army, receiving the croix de guerre with silver star; also Lieutenant Owens received a personal letter from General Pershing, the Commander-in-Chief of the A. E. F. commending him for his attempt to rescue Privates 1st. Class Charles Dolan and George Mayer.

-------------------

Hugh Wilson MacNair (S.S.U. 65) has been awarded the Distitiguished Service Cross. MacNair was serving in Section 622 of the U. S. A. A. S. and was severely wounded last September.

-------------------

        THE RUMMY RUMINATES

O' coarse, this g'air, it ain't no opry buff,
Thair ain't no bands nor cheering over here,
An' sometimes life is pretty doggone tough
An' everyday is desolate and drear.
You eat a mess o' vittles that don't grow
On high-brow menus, sech as hash or stew,
For army vittles, they ain't much I know,
An' yet they fill your belly up for you.
Mebbe you sleep in an abandoned shed
Some "onery cows called " home" just t' other day,
Or on some brancard dyed in dirty red
Where a poor poilu bled his life away;
While all the time them howling cannons keep.
A-shooting hell into the hellish Hun,
An' making sech a racket you caint sleep
But off and on --- an' when the night is done
You're tired and sick, an', Gawd! how you do long
For jest one minute of the ease you knew
When you was home and life was one gran' song
An' "fill-a min-yon" had the place of " stew ".
But, what-ta-hell, aint this a man's-sized war?
Aint you-all never yet outgrown your nurse?
Then what-a', you forever kicking for?
It aint so bad it couldn't be no worse.
The days, they drag, but, shucks, they's work for all
An' each day means its gettin' near to when
Th' Ky-zer's goin' to have an awful fall,
An' we can stand for anything 'til then!
What if the food aint what you ust-a eat
An' feather beds are mighty doggone rare,
Say! wont them rich old dinners home taste sweet
When you get back to breathe good Yankee air?
An' think o' goin' up to hit th' hay
In your own room, filled up with sleepy peace,
With not a non-com in the world to say
When them contented, snorin' sounds shall cease
Bo, I can live through ten long years for this;
To know the Huns are licked, and then to go
Back to a home that holds :a greater bliss
Because I played a part in this here show.

J. B. C., 17/635.

-------------------

            REIMS

'T is night and all is dark
     I hear the shells roar by,
     Against a dusky sky.
I see a flash of brillant red

On yonder plains what are those forms
     That loom austere, on high?
They are the mighty towers of Reims
     That stand against a dusky sky.

O, when shall conflicts cease,
     And mankind even be
Content to 'dwell in God's fair-land
     In peace, in love and harmony.

Russell Davey GREENE,
Air Service A. E. F. (Formerly S.S.U. 68).

 

                TO ONE I SLEW

I killed your body. I quenched your breath,
But it wasn't your life I sought,
And the thought that I sent you unto your death
With a measure of sorrow' is fraught.

So I give you my tears for a life made void.
Still, it stood for a sinister power
'T was your life attainted with this I destroyed,
Like a beautiful poisonous flower.

David DARRAH,
Reserve Mallet.

-------------------

FROM PERSONAL LETTERS

16 November, 1918.

Dear Field Service

Just a note to thank you for package of cigarettes and chocolate, received last night. I can assure you it was welcome. Here we are in an awful little village on the Belgian border where we happened to he passing when we got the news of the armistice. Six days have given us more or less of a chance to gather ourselves together aria get a bit settled again. But the cooperatives are not yet working and we are far from any Y. M. C. A. so chocolate and cigarettes came as gifts from the gods. Thanks again, therefore. I hope to he in to sec you soon and to celebrate a bit.

Charles Bayly, Jr.
Aspirant 3e R. A. C.

-------------------

Captain F. J. Beatty (S.S.U. 4) now in the 118th Infantry writes:

"Some time ago I mailed you some francs for a subscription to the Field Service Bulletin, but have never received any copies. Please try to start it going at once, as I'm anxious to know what the old crowd are doing.

"We are en repos for the time being, after a month or so of busting up the Hindenburg line."

-------------------

Candidate Howard R. Coan, 7th Co., G. M. G. O. T. S. writes from Camp Hancock Georgia, October 27th:

"As a member of S.S.U. XXVII for six months I still enjoy receiving the Bulletin with its close association with experiences and people those of us who served as volunteers can never forget. When I came back to the States in August I had no idea where I should be, but now I am located at the Machine Gun officers' Training School for at least three months, and wanted to let you know my new address. In the last Bulletin received, September 21st number, I was glad to see that Jim Parmalee, who was in my Section has graduated from Fontainebleau.

"I hope to be back in France before many months, in the meantime, Greetings to all. I used to know ‘over there’ ".

-------------------

Aspirant John H. Chipman (T.M.U. 184) writes on November 10th from 258 Batterie, 232e Reg't d'A. C., Secteur 20:

"You may be interested to know things are going mighty well here. We've lost the Germans! They are retreating so fast we can't make our horses live long enough to catch up with them (we lost three just today after completing a 70 kilometer trip since yesterday A. M.).

"The country here is not very badly damaged but the people, I can tell you, will be glad to see those articles on "How To Get Fat in Thirty Days ".

"I am enclosing a Fiver to the honored editor of the Bulletin for a subscription as far as it will go and when he needs more he can count on me."

-------------------

NOTES

R. W. Litchfield (S.S.U. 14) M. T.C. was taken prisoner last July.

Donald L. Campbell (S.S.U. 69) who has been with the American Red Cross in Italy will return to the United States shortly as a convalescent.

S. W. Senter (S.S.U. 10) is now Sgt. Co. B, 304 Battalion Tank Corps, American E. F.

The following former American Field Service men are included in the class recently graduated from the Ecole Militaire at Fontainebleau, and are now Aspirants in the French Army.

Harry Dale Wood (S.S.U. 69).
Kenneth C. Wesley (S.S.U. 69).
Henry M. Hamilton (S.S.U. 69).
David M. Wesson (S.S.U. 70).
John Craig, Jr. (S.S.U. 2).
David J. Post, Jr. (S.S.U. 9).
G. E. Rehm (S.S.U. 12).
F. Goodrich (S.S.U. 12).
Charles H. Fabens (T.M.U. 242).
Raymond H. Fussell (T,M.U. 397).
Francis P. Nash (T.M.U. 397).

-------------------

PRESENT ACTIVITIES OF FORMER A. F. S. MEN

Thomas Ridgway Coward T.M.U. 526 Intelligence Division, Office of the Counselor, Washington.
William Ferdinand Huffman S.S.U. 27 2nd Lieut. Field Artillery, Camp Jackson, S. C.
Theodore E. Obrig S.S.U. 26 Mobile Field Laboratory, 87th Division, American E. F.
Frederick Norris Spaulding T.M.U. 184 Pvt. F. A., C. O. T. S. Louisville, Ky.
Lucius Ellsworth Thayer S.S.U. 8 Coxswain, Navy, Co. 2, 3rd. Regt. Pelham Bay, N. Y.
Donald M. Walden S.S.U. 2 2nd Lieut. F. A. 90th Aero Squadron, American E. F.
Charles Paine Winsor S.S.U. 1 1st Lieut. 22nd U. S. Infantry, U.S.A.
Oliver Wolcoot S.S.U. 2 Capt. Headquarters 26th Div. American E: F.

------------------

VISITORS AT, 21 RUE RAYNOUARD

Kenneth T. White (S.S.U. 4) Lieut. 2nd Corps Aeronautical School; John S. Carter, Jr. (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S. ; Joel H. Newell (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Joseph Bixby (S.S.U. 2) U. S. A. A. S.; Philip T. Sprague (S.S.U. 8) Lieut. Chemical Warfare Service; Leslie Buswell (S.S.U. 2) ; J. R. Greenwood (S.S.U. 8) Capt. U. S. A. A. S.; R. W. Gauger (S.S.U. 65) U. S. A. A. S.; F. D. Ogilvie (S.S.U. 2) British Red Cross; Henry B. Warren (S.S.U. 10) U. S. A. A. S. ; Richard E. Goss (S.S.U. 10) U. S. A. A. S.; Edward Samuel Jr. (S.S.U. 10) U. .S. A. A. S.; William J. Losh (S.S.U. 14 and 10) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. A. S.; George T. Griffin (T.M.U. 155) Garden Service No. 1, A. E. F.; Robert Rieser (S.S.U., 33) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau; Harry B. Harter (S.S.U. 70) French Air Service; R. T. Hanks (T.M.U. 133) 59e Brigade, Fontainebleau ; Francis C. Jones (T.M.U. 133) 59th Brigade, Fontainebleau ; George M. Hollister (S.S.U. 3) 2nd Lieut. U. S. Infantry; L. R. Hunter (S.S.U. 30) ; E. D. Kneass (S.S.U. 10) Elève Aspirant, Fontainebleau ; C. F. Roe (T.M.U. 526) Eleve Aspirant, Fontainebleau; D. M. Smith (T.M.U. 397) Eleve Aspirant, Fontainebleau; Richard Temple (T.M.U. 526) Eleve Aspirant, Fontainebleau; Donald L. Campbell (S.S.U. 69) American Red Cross; Bennett C. Wells (T.M.U. 526) 1st Lieut. U. S. A. S. ; H. W. Patterson (T.M.U. 133) Observation School, French Artillery ; Frank Caldwell (S.S.U. 66) Observation School French Artillery; R. Simmons (T.M.U. 184) Observation School, French Artillery; Robert Hyman (T.M.U. 242) Observation School, French Artillery; Edward S. Storer (S.S.U. 13) U. S. A. A. S.; Arthur B. Kinsolving (S.S.U. 4) Lieut. U. S. A. A. S.; G. Hinman Barrett (S.S.U. 32) Lieut. U. S. A. A. S.

______________________________________________
7619 - S. P. I.. 27, RUE NICOLO- PARIS (XVIe)


AFS Bulletin Number Seventy-Three

Index