Thomas Stretton Esten Western Desert 29 April 1942
George Oscar Tichenor Western Desert 11 June 1942
Stanley Blazei Kulak Western Desert 11 June 1942
William Keith McLarty Western Desert 21 July 1947
Arthur Paisley Foster Western Desert 3 September 1942
John Fletcher Watson At Sea 4 December 1942
Randolph Clay Eaton Western Desert 25 March 1943
John Hopkins Denison, Jr. Western Desert 27 March 1943
August Alexander Rubel North Africa 28 April 1943
Richard Stirling Stockton North Africa 28 April 1943
Curtis Charles Rodgers Middle East 1 May 1943
Caleb Jones Milne IV North Africa 11 May 1943
Vernon William Preble Italy 1 December 1943
Charles James Andrews, Jr. Italy 8 December 1943
Charles Kendrick Adams, Jr. At Sea 14 January 1944
Henry Larner Italy 27 January 1944
Alexander Randall, Jr. Italy 8 February 1944
George Edward Brannan Burma 5 May 1944
Robert Carter Bryan Italy 17 May 1944
Dawson Ellsworth Italy 2 June 1944
John Dale Cuningham Italy 4 June 1944
George Alden Ladd Burma 2 July 1944
Donald Joseph Harty Italy 5 July 1944
Thomas Lees Marshall Italy 9 July 1944
Paul Haynes Cagle Italy 5 September 1944
James Bennet Wilton, Jr. Italy 9 September 1944
Ralph Evans Boaz Burma 23 October 1944
William Tuttle Orth Burma 23 October 1944
Albert Studley Miller France 7 February 1945
Bruce Gilette Henderson Burma 15 February 1945
Paul Michael McKenna Burma 73 February 1945
Hilding Swenssen Burma 28 February 1945
Charles Butler Alexander, Jr. Germany 9 April 1945
Jack Wells Douthitt Germany 20 April 1945
Gerald Riley Murphy Burma 20 June 1945
John Wilder Parkhurst Burma 3 July 1945

 

ROLL OF HONOR

1915-1917

Richard Neville Hall France December 1915
Edward Joseph Kelley France September 1916
Edward Carter Sortwell Salonica November 1916
Howard Burchard Lines France December 1916
Henry E. M. Suckley Albania March 1917
Paul Gannett Osborn France June 1917
George Frederick Norton France July 1917
Harmon Bushnell Craig France July 1917
Perley Raymond Hamilton France July 1917
James Wilson Gailey France July 1917
John Verplanck Newlin France August 1917
Paul Cady Bentley France September 1917

 William de Ford Bigelow, AFS 1915-1917, died November 23rd, 1942, while acting as New England Representative, World War I.

 

Thomas Stretton Esten

George Oscar Tichenor

Stanley Blazei Kulak

William Keith McLarty

Arthur Paisley Foster

John Fletcher Watson

Randolph Clay Eaton

John Hopkins Denison, Jr.

August Alexander Rubel

Richard Stirling Stockton

Curtis Charles Rodgers

Caleb Jones Milne IV

Vernon William Preble

Charles James Andrews, Jr.

Charles Kendrick Adams, Jr.

Henry Larner

Alexander Randall, Jr.

George Edward Brannan

Robert Carter Bryan

Dawson Ellsworth

John Dale Cuningham

George Alden Ladd

Donald Joseph Harty

Thomas Lees Marshall

Paul Haynes Cagle

James Bennet Wilton, Jr.

Ralph Evans Boaz

William Tuttle Orth

Albert Studley Miller

Bruce Gilette Henderson

Paul Michael McKenna

Hilding Swenssen

Charles Butler Alexander, Jr.

Jack Wells Douthitt

Gerald Riley Murphy

John Wilder Parkhurst

 

Victory

The battle's won. Across the weary earth
The many nations that men thought had died,
Defenceless, meek, ignobly crucified,
Have proved the Resurrection. Not with mirth
And empty laughter do we bid the war
Farewell, but rather, quietly, in a deep
Proud grief and heartfelt gratitude we'll weep
For those there was no time to mourn before.
Then taking up the challenge that they willed
As legacy-the work they would have done
With fresh foundations we will start to build
The world anew. confident, fearing none,
Nor resting till the pledge has been fulfilled
Beyond their dreams. The battle's just begun I

--G. I Lee

The above poem was first published in the Transatlantic DAILY MAIL

 

WOUNDED IN ACTION, WORLD WAR II

Thomas Barbour, II Newell O. Jenkins
Ralph W. Beck Robert E. Kennedy
Daniel P. Beatty George Barr King
Franklin S. Billings, Jr. LeRoy H. Krusi
Clifford J. Bissler Norman Laden
Henry S. Bonner Alan P. Martin, Jr.
Walter Bradley Alexander McElwain
Turner Bullock Dayton T. Mitchell, II
George R. Bunker Raymond McK. Mitchell
Wallace A. Chapin Stephen I. Munger, IV
Robert C. Coffey B. Stuyvesant Pierrepont
Allen Y. Davis Charles Pratt, Jr.
Richard G. Decatur William H. Rawdon
Frank A. Dignam James E. Reppert
Stuart M. Donaldson Clifford O. Saber
Edgar S. Driver Joseph N. Schicker
William B. Eberhard George A. Sears
Frederick E. Ellis Lorenzo Semple, III
David A. Binary Norman Shethar
C. Manning Field Arthur M.P. Stratton
Benjamin P. Ford George E.M. Stumpp, III
Robert G. Frazer George F. Stutz
Warren G. Fugitt Edward E. Tanner (twice)
W. Dean Fuller, Yr. H. William Taylor, Jr.
Warren G. Fuller Reginald B. Taylor
Robert F. Glasser Lawrence Tome
Bert E. Grove David C. Viall (twice)
Richard T. Hamilton Richard A. Von Glatz
John C. Harkness Richard C. Waller
David DeV, Heath William B. Warden
Joseph B. Helfrich, Yr. Arthur L Wheeler
John N. Hobbs John. Garrett Wilson
Dennis D. Hunt Richard B. Winder, IV
Daniel James Robert L. Yancey

 

PRISONERS OF WAR IN WORLD WAR II

Richard Craig Anderson Italy Liberated April 1945
Mortimer William Belshaw Western Desert Exchanged
John Clement France 1940 Released after Armistice
Donald Q. Coster France 1940 Released after Armistice
Peter Cooper Tiemann Glenn Western Desert Exchanged
George Farquhar James King France 1940 Released after Armistice
Alexander McElwain Western Desert Exchanged
Houghton Pierce Metcalf, Jr. Italy Liberated April 1945
William Walter Mitchell Western Desert Exchanged.
Charles Elliott Perkins, Jr. Western Desert Exchanged
Laurence Collier Sanders Western Desert Exchanged
Alan Rutherford Stuyvesant Western Desert Exchanged
Harry Gregory Wait France 1940 Released after Armistice

-----------------------------------------------------------------

With this issue the A.F.S. Letters come to an end.

Through your willingness to share them with others they brought you all closer to your son or husband overseas and so served their purpose. Mrs. Field was in charge of editing them and to her and Joan Belmont who helped her goes all the credit for what they have meant to you.

The A.F.S. will go on. Plans are nearly completed to insure its operation as a peace-time organization. It can not only preserve what each of its members gained in his associations during these two wars, but it can also play an essential part in furthering the goodwill its men have already engendered among those with whom they have campaigned.

It seems to me fitting that at this time I should thank you, the families, for your infinite patience and thoughtfulness during these past years to those of us at 60 Beaver Street in whose hands the administration of the American Field Service lay. With security, censorship, with difficulties of communications and all the dislocations that war brings, we realized your anxieties but could do little except try to re-assure you. Yet we found you always considerate and understanding and this confidence helped make the task easier, I am deeply grateful.

I beg you to continue your interest and support and not let the unselfish record of an ideal which these pages sum up belong only to the past.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

AWARDS AND DECORATIONS

 

GEORGE MEDAL

Neil M. Gilliam

 

ORDER OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE

Douglas G. Atwood Honorary Member
Ralph S. Richmond Honorary Officer
Charles S. Snead Honorary Officer
Frederick W. Hoeing Honorary Member
Douglas G. Atwood Honorary Member
Arthur Howe, Jr. Honorary Officer
Chauncey B. Ives, Jr. Honorary Member
Richard E. Paulson Honorary Member

 

BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL

Harcourt Amory, Jr. Gibson D. Hazard
Ralph W. Beck George E. Holton
Lawrence G. Bigelow George B. Lester
Walter Bradley Charles E. Perkins, Jr.
Walter J. Brethauer Charles S. Satterthwait, Jr.
William H. Browning II Charles O. Stewart
Robert M. Campbell Morton B. Strauss
Calvin B. Dunwoody Robert J. B. Sullivan
Charles W. Farnham, Jr. Samuel J. Tankoos, Jr.
C. Manning Field Howard S. Terrell
Richard Field John G. Wilson
Benjamin P. Ford Charles M. Wright
Merle E. Hall  

 

MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES

Daniel Adams Charles Henry Horton
William W. Baer, Jr. Daniel James
Frederick E. Balderston Charles E. Johnson, Jr,
Edmund Baylies Chanler Y. Keller
Livingston L. Biddle, Jr. Philip A. Litchfield
Robert F. Blair, Jr. Warner E. Love
Frederick W. Bohning George F. McKay
James A. Briggs Thomas L. Marshall
James McC. Brindley John R. Meeker (twice)
Kirk Browning Michael V. Moran
Robert C. Bryan Jay L. Nierenberg
Thomas R. Byrd Julian R. Orton, Jr. (twice)
Paul H. Cagle John R. Peabody
Ward B. Chamberlin III John deJ Pemberton, Jr.
Frank B. Cliffe, Jr. Ralph H. Poole, Jr.
Thomas L. H. Cole Vernon W. Preble
Thomas N. DePew Charles M. Rector
Edgar S. Driver Laurence C. Sanders
Norman D. Fenn Charles S. Satterthwait, Jr.
Edgar A. Fitter, Jr. Friench Simpson, Jr.
Laurence S. Garland, Jr. Peter E. Sloane
Neil McD. Gilliam Drayton M. Smith
Thomas Hale Joseph N. Smith
Donald J. Harty Samuel S. Truitt
Merrill G. Hastings, Jr. William D. Watson, Jr.
Ray A. Hauserman, Jr. (twice) Richard B. Winder
Leo E. Hillery Bernard H. Wood III

 

MEDAILLE MILITAIRE

John Davis Dun
Lorenzo Semple III
George Oscar Tichenor

 

CROIX DE GUERRE

Jeremy Addoms Reg. George F. J. King Corps
Charles B. Alexander, Jr. Army Martin P. Knowlton Div.
Frederick M. Blow Reg. Edward C. Koenig, Jr. Reg.
Albert C. Burrage III Reg. LeRoy H. Krusi Div.
David C. Burton Reg. George E. McCandlish Reg.
John Clement Corps Alexander McElwain Reg.
Charles H. Coster (twice) Div., Reg. Philip E. M. Meyer Div.
Donald Q. Coster Corps Wright A. Nodine Reg
Charles Cutler Curtis Reg. Richard Norton Div.
Jack W. Douthitt Army Hilgard Pannes Reg.
John D. Dun Army Francis N. Rich Reg.
John E. L. Earle Div. Walter G. Roberts Div.
William B. Eberhard Div. Lorenzo Semple III Army
Warren G. Fugitt Div. William G. Shearman Reg.
Horace W. Fuller Reg. Gayle S. Smith Reg.
Walter D. Fuller, Jr. Reg. LeClair Smith Div.
Dean W. Graves Reg. Charles Stehlin Reg.
Thomas O. Greenough (twice) Corps, Reg. David F. Stetson Reg.
John K. Hammond Div. Alan R. Stuyvesant Army
William T. C. Hannah Reg. Lewis R. Stuyvesant Div.
Wendell M. Hastings Reg. Jon Thoresen Reg.
John C. Hodel Reg. George O. Tichenor (twice)- Army
Bertrand Hutchinson Reg. H. Gregory Wait Corps
John S. R. James Reg. Erwin H. Watts Reg.
Charles N. Jefferys Div. Harold B. Willis Reg.
Alfred G. Johnson Reg.    

 

AWARDS, WORLD WAR I

Légion d'Honneur

2

Médaille Militaire

5

Croix de Guerre

245

Section Citations

21

 

AMERICAN DECORATIONS

 

BRONZE STAR

Warren Graves Fugitt

 

PURPLE HEART

Charles B. Alexander, Jr. Dennis D. Hunt
Franklin S. Billings, Jr. Norman Laden
Richard G. Decatur Charles Pratt, Jr.
Dawson Ellsworth Joseph N. Schicker
Robert G. Frazer David C. Viall
Warren G. Fugitt John Garrett Wilson
Richard S.T. Hamilton  

---------------------------------------------

POLISH DECORATIONS

 

BRONZE CROSS OF MERIT WITH SWORDS

Robert M. Applewhite Samuel Mason III
Lawrence G. Bigelow Quentin F. Maule
William G. Congdon Lawrence D. Printup
John C. Harkness Arthur R. Zimmer

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CAMPAIGN RIBBONS

BRITISH

1939-45 Star

1536

men
Africa Star

740

"
Italy Star

947

"
Burma Star

370

"
France-Germany Star

107

"

UNITED STATES

"Under the provisions of War Department Cable WARX 29101, 30 January 1945, the European-African-Middle Eastern campaign ribbon is awarded, for outstanding and conspicuous service with the armed forces under difficult and hazardous combat conditions."

EAME 86 men

ITALIAN

Il Cuore di Rincalzo 6 men

 

BATTLES PARTICIPATED IN BY AFS.

FRANCE

1939-1940

MIDDLE EAST (485, 567, FF)
  Bir Hacheim

May

1942
  Knightsbridge

"

"
  Tobruk

June

"
  Mingar Quaim

"

"
  El Alamein

September

"
  Tripoli

January

1943
  Mareth Line

March

"
  Enfidaville

April

"
  Tunis

May

"
  Cap Bon

"

"
ITALY (485 & 567)    
  Termoli

October

1943
  Volturno

"

"
  Garigliano

"

"
  Sangro

December

"
  Ortona

"

"
  Anzio

January

1944
  Cassino

February

"
  Gustav Line

May

"
  Arezzo

July

"
  Arno

August

"
  Gothic Line

October

"
  Serrio

March

1945
  Bologna

April

"
GERMANY-HOLLAND (567)   April-May

1945
INDIA-BURMA The Japanese attack on Imphal began in March, 1944; the Imphal area was cleared of Japanese in June 1944
  Tiddim

October

1944
  Kalewa

December

"
  Shwebo

January

1945
  Meiktila

March

"
  Mandalay

"

"
  Pegu

May

"
  Prome

"

"
  Rangoon

"

"
FRANCE

"

"
  Vosges

Nov. 1944- Jan.

1945
  Colmar

Jan. - Feb.

"
  Lauter

March

"
  Rhine

"

"
  Black Forest

April

"
  Stuttgart

"

"
  Constance

April-May

"
  Vorarlberg

"

"
  Arlberg

"

"

 

FUNDS COLLECTED

From September, 1939, to the middle of 1944, the American Field Service raised its own funds. To those who so generously donated this money and to those who helped in the raising of it, go our sincere thanks.

In the spring of 1944, the AFS became a Member Agency of the National War Fund, and of the $2,460,040.37 received by the Service from September, 1939 to December 1945, $683,599.96 was supplied by the NWF. The following is the breakdown of funds received:

From Contributions
and other sources

From National War Fund

Total
1939   -

$30,899.32

 

30,899.32

1940   -

304,047.81

 

304,047.03

1941   -

216,384.45

 

216,384.45

1942   -

581,528.54

 

581,528.54

1943   -

497,903.29,

 

497,90329

1944   -

131,009,15

237,809,23

368,818.38

1945   -

14,667.85

445,790.73

460,458.58

 

$1, 776,440.41

$683,599.96

$2,460,040.37

 

Of this total received, the sum of $2,188, 615.11 was expended in and for the field. The administration expense of the AFS, including the running of the New York Headquarters, was 7.4%, We were able to operate at this very low percentage because of the many volunteer workers who formed the staff of the New York office.

 

ACHIEVEMENT

The above sum enabled AFS to carry over 1,000,000 wounded and sick during the period 1940-1945. This is about double the amount carried lit the last war, 1914-1917.

  

NUMBER OF MEN IN AFS

WORLD WAR I      France 1915-17  (6 months enlistment period)

2500
WORLD WAR II 1939-45 (18 months enlistment period)

2196

Total strength of various theatres:

France 1940 77
Free French Syria 1941 17
Kenya 1941-42 2
Middle East 1941-43 807
Mediterranean Theatre 1943-45 799
B. L. A. (Holland & Germany) 1945 2-57
France 1945 123
India-Burma 1943-45 812
Total strength overseas on VE Day 891

------------------------------------------------------------------

DISTRIBUTION OF MEN

Every state in the Union was represented except North Dakota, South Dakota, and Utah; the following by 60, or more:

1.

New York 434

6..

Illinois 101

2.

Massachusetts 223

7.

California 94

3.

Pennsylvania 211

8.

Ohio 85

4.

Connecticut 119

9.

Wisconsin 62

5.

New Jersey 107

10.

Michigan 60

 

Men other than U.S. citizens were as follows:

Canadian 3 South African 2
Dutch 2 Spanish 1
English 2 Swiss 1
Norwegian 1    

 

------------------------------------------------------------------

EMBARKATIONS

THEATRE

UNITS
   
Middle East

39
Central Mediterranean

66
India-Burma

60
France 1944-45

10

----------------------------------------

EMBARKATIONS
(Transfers from one theatre to another not included)

THEATRES
 

VOLUNTEERS
France 1939-1940

77
Kenya Colony 1940-1941

2
Syria (Free French) January 1941

17
Middle East November 1941-January 1943

807
Central Mediterranean February 1943-May 1945

827
India-Burma April 1943-August 1945

615
France June 1944-April 11945

1107

Note: In the Battle of the Atlantic three AFS units were torpedoed on the outbound voyage, and four on the home-bound.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

24 volunteers in World War II are sons of AFS men who served in World War I

AFS 1940-1945

AFS 1914-1917
William B. Bennett, Jr. William B. Bennett
Lawrence G. Bigelow Donald F. Bigelow
Alexander Boyd Jackson H. Boyd
Bernard F. Desloge Joseph T. Desloge
Joseph T. Desloge, Jr.

"
Francis Arthur Foster Arthur P. Foster
James McDougal Foster

"
Michael G. Hall Walter Phelps Hall, Jr.
Raymond J. Hanks Raymond T. Hanks
Edward Pierce Johnson William McK. Johnson
Lucien Kinsolving Charles McIlvaine Kinsolving
LeRoy H. Krusi LeRoy F. Krusi
Perrin Hamilton Long, Jr. Perrin Hamilton Long
Stephen I. Munger, IV Stephen I. Munger, Jr.
Beauveau Nalle Albert Nalle
G. Eustice Paine, Jr. George Eustice Paine
Henry S. Peltz John DeW. Peltz
Alan D.K. Potter Philip B.K. Potter
William Alexander Rich Dominic W. Rich
Henry Stephen Tilton Elmer H. Tilton
Samuel S. Walker, Jr. Samuel S. Walker
Willard Brewer Walker William H. Walker
Henry Garneau Weld Garneau Weld
John Gale Wright Whitney B. Wright

 

AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES,

Elbridge Adams Connecticut
Prof. Edwin N. Adriance Massachusetts
Wharton Allen Colorado
Belford P. Atkinson Ohio
R. Randolph Ball California
E. Geoffrey Bangs California
R. O. Beach Texas
William DeFord Bigelow Massachusetts
Barron F. Black Virginia
Herbert C. Blake New York
Frank H. Boyd Ohio
Louis Bromfield Ohio
John H. Brooks Pennsylvania
J. Paulding Brown District of Columbia
Prof. Leslie H. Buckler Virginia
Roger A. Burrell Ohio
Steve L. Burwell Mississippi
Leslie Buswell Florida
William P. Church Illinois
Robert D. Clark Minnesota
Archie R. Connor Arizona
Walter Cope Pennsylvania
Beman G. Dawes, Jr. Ohio
Donald E. De Tray Ohio
Jackson Dick Georgia
Hector Dodds New York
Prof. C. V. Donovan Illinois
Sherman Ellsworth Washington
S. Prescott Fay Massachusetts
David Ford Ohio
Robert France Maryland
Robert Friedlich New York
Wells Gilbert Oregon
Prof. Robert K. Gooch Virginia
Charles H. Griesa Missouri
Merle E. Hall Iowa
Raymond T. Hanks Ohio
J. Clifford Hanna Michigan
L. Douglas Heck Connecticut
S. W. Hendrix, Jr. Indiana
Ralph B. Hill Arkansas
J. Dana Hutchinson New York
Robert H. Hutchinson London (England)
James M. Irwin Ohio
Charles E. Johnson North Carolina
F. Kirk Johnson Texas
Wallace B. Johnson New York
Earl T. Johnston Oklahoma
Harry R. Karnaghan New York
LeRoy F. Krusi California
Frank LaFlamme New Hampshire
G. Norbert LeVeillie New York
Charles W. B. Lindeman Washington
A. Edward MacDougall New York
Paul H. Martin West Virginia
Thomas F. McAllister Michigan
Verner McClelland Alabama
John H. McFadden, Jr. Tennessee
Prof. Thomas Means Maine
Perry H. Merrill Vermont
Berkeley Michael Iowa
Alexander Mitchell Florida
Curtis Moffat Massachusetts
Stephen I. Munger, Jr. Texas
Joel H. Newell Massachusetts
John R. Nichols ldaho
Thomas J. O'Brien Utah
Frederick Olmsted Maine
J. Robert Orton Ohio
Schuyler Parsons Rhode Island
Perry J. Patton California
Harold W. Peffers Connecticut
Norman A. Peters Michigan
Jerome Phillips Alabama
Wallace B. Phillips London, England
Fred Post Florida
Lars S. Potter New York
William Prickett Delaware
Lawrence E. Pumpelly New York
Jack F. Rabey Georgia
John V. Ray West Virginia
Barclay Robinson Connecticut
Thomas A. Robinson Pennsylvania
Clifton Rodes Kentucky
Prof. Samuel Rogers Wisconsin
Kenneth Rotharmel Louisiana
Ernest R. Schoen Georgia
Edgar Scott Pennsylvania
John L. Scott Washington
Edward N. Seccombe Connecticut
E. A. Shelton Texas
Arthur A. Shirley Michigan
Herbert R. Spencer Pennsylvania
James M. Sponagle Arizona
Carl Stix Ohio
Henry Taylor Pennsylvania
Lee S. Thompson Michigan
James M. Tomkins Connecticut
John W. Upsher Oklahoma
Bradlee Van Brunt Wisconsin
Alex Vonnegut Indiana
W. H. Ward South Carolina
Alton Waschka Louisiana
Garneau Weld Missouri
Wade White Massachusetts
William W. White Illinois
Dr. John B. Whitton New Jersey
Martin B. Williams Virginia
Whitney B. Wright Califomia
William J. Wright Ohio

 

FOUNDER OF THE AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE

A. Piatt Andrew founded the American Field Service in 1915 when he went to French General Headquarters at Chantilly and persuaded the Army High Command that American volunteer ambulance drivers could be trusted to work at the front lines.

He re-organized the existing rear service attached to the American Ambulance Hospital in Paris and sent three sections of 25 men each to the front in April, 1915.

Under his direction the Service grew and when taken over by the U.S. Army in November, 1917, was serving practically every French division from Switzerland to Belgium as well as providing a transport service known as the Reserve Mallet from April 1917, to November 1917.

Before organizing the Field Service, A Piatt Andrew had been a professor of economics at Harvard University, a member of Senator Aldrich's monetary commission, and Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. After his AFS service he became Colonel U.S.A.A.S., received the D. S. M. , Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre. He was elected Representative to Congress from the North Shore District of Massachusetts and served continuous terms until his death.

AFS at Verdun - 1916

AFS at Beauvais - 1940

Western Desert - 1942

Anzio - 1943

Jungle convoy in Burma - 1944

Crossing the Rhine - 1945

Through the Austrian Tyrol - 1945

STEVE

" ....sage in council, dominating in action, merry in play, tender of heart, respected by all and beloved by associates and friends."

"UNCLE BILL" WALLACE

who, with loyalty and affection, supervized the departure and arrival of over twenty-one hundred AFSers during more than five years of war.

 

TRIBUTES TO THE AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE. 1940-1945

AMBASSADE
DE LA REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE
AUX ETATS-UNIS

WASHINGTON, le July 15,1940

Dear Mr. Galatti,

Will you kindly transmit the following message to the members of the American Field Service who are returning from France.

On your return from France I am glad to send you my warmest greetings. After the hard days you have lived in my country, I want to express my deepest gratitude for the invaluable help and the comfort you gave to thousands of wounded and refugees under most severe circumstances. I am sure the devotion you and all the members of the American Field Service have shown towards my compatriots and the gallantry you have displayed on the battlefields of France will long live in the hearts of Frenchmen and will be a precious memory of times otherwise tragic."

With best personal regards

Yours very sincerely

(signed)
Saint-Quentain

* * *

Secretary of State for War

War Office
Whitehall
S.W. 1

30 October, 1940

My dear Mr. Galatti

Some time ago Rex Benson wrote to me and told me in outline about the work that you and the American Field Service wider you are doing to provide, staff and equip ambulances for service with the British Army in the Middle East

I cannot resist the opportunity this gives me to write and tell you personally of our gratitude and appreciation. I know that your most generous offer has been accepted to the limit of operational considerations and that a very impressive number of fully equipped ambulances with complete staffs will shortly be ready for attachment to our Middle East Forces.

This splendid gift from the American Field Service is another tangible proof of American citizens' sympathy with the Cause to which we are pledged and I earnestly hope you may find some means of conveying to all who share in it the lasting gratitude of myself and the Commander and men of the Army

To you and your Staff I would say that I can realize the extent of your contribution in organizing the gift and sending it to us in so complete a form and I thank you all most warmly.

Such gifts as yours are an invaluable encouragement and inspiration to all of us in this country, civilians and fighting men alike, and I cannot too cordially express our appreciation.

I should like lastly to reaffirm the assurance already given to you that we have taken all the necessary steps to ensure that the American Field Service personnel is protected by the terms of the Geneva Convention.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
David Mayesson

* * *

L A 529 N TWS PD 3 MINS - PGI Governors Island NY 5 242P

Mr. Stephen Galatti
American Field Service
1 William Street

Nov 5 1941 3:20 P.M.

PLEASE CONVEY MY CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY FOUR VOLUNTEERS WHO ARE ABOUT TO LEAVE THE UNITED STATES AS MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE TO THE NEAR EAST STOP THE UNSELFISH DEVOTION THAT PROMPTED THEM TO JOIN IN RELIEVING THE SUFFERINGS OF THOSE WHO ARE DEFENDING DEMOCRACY IS AN INSPIRATION TO ALL OF US STOP I HOPE THAT THEIR SERVICE WILL BRING THEM THAT PERSONAL SATISFACTION THAT ALWAYS COME WITH THE PERFORMANCE OF AN IMPORTANT AND DIFFICULT ASSIGNMENT STOP I JOIN WITH MILLIONS OF THEIR FELLOW COUNTRYMEN IN WISHING THEM GODSPEED

(signed)
HENRY L. STIMSON

* * *

DEC 29 1941 1:30 PM

LA 506 56-Ottawa Ont 1213P

STEPHEN GALATTI - DIRECTOR GENERAL AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE
UNION CLUB NEW YORK NY

I HAVE JUST BEARD THAT A SECOND PARTY OF AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE VOLUNTEERS IS SHORTLY LEAVING TO JOIN THEIR COMRADES WHO ARE ALREADY WITH THEIR AMBULANCES SERVING THE ARMIES OF GENERAL AUCHINLECK I SEND YOU MY THANKS FOR THE NOBLE HELP WHICH YOUR ORGANIZATION IS GIVING AND I WISH THEM ALL GOD SPEED AND SAFE RETURN

(signed)
WINSTON CHURCHILL

* * *

K/AF
FORCE FRANÇAISES LIBRES
-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-
FORCE L
1ST FREE FRENCH GROUP
-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-
ETAT MAJOR * 2 BUREAU
-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-
No 596/2

Q. G le 20 Avril 1942

Le Général de Division de LARMINAT
Commandant la Force L
à
Monsieur Stephen Galatti, Esq,
s/c Mr. Le Colonel Ralph Richmond
A.F.S - S.T. G.H.Q. M.E.F.

C'est avec une vive satisfaction que j'ai vu arriver les 10 conducteurs de l'American Field Service, Volontaires pour servir avec les Forces Françaises Libres. Ils seront particulièrement utiles à la 1ère Brigade dans les circonstances actuelles

L'appui ainsi donné aux Forces Françaises Libres, s'ajoutant aux multiples services que rendent les voitures sanitaires de votre formation, valent à l'American Field Service toute la reconnaissance des Forces Françaises Libres,,

Je vous prie d'agréer l'expression de cette reconnaissance avec tous mes remerciements personnels.

(signed)
/1e Général de Brigade
adjoint

(stamped) FORCES FRANCAISES LIBRES

* * *

FRANGE LIBRE
"Honneur et Patrie"

New York - 4 Mai 1942

Le Haut-Commissaire
de L'Afrique Française Libre

Cher Monsieur Galatti,

Mon passage par les Etats Unis d'Amérique me procure le plaisir de vous voir et de vous remercier du grand appui que vous nous avez apporté, avec l'aide de Membres de l'American Field Service.

Les 23 voitures d'ambulance, dont vous avez doté, si rapidement, nos formations sanitaires, sont toutes utilisées par nos forces, en campagne, en Cyrénaique ou en réserve en Levant Ces voitures d'ambulance sont destinées à un très important et un très lourd service. Leur destruction par les bombardements est à prévoir également

C'est donc une pensée sage que de songer à leur constituer une reserve de remplacement, afin que l'évacuation et le transport de nos blessés puissent avoir la garantie de se trouver toujours assuré, quoiqu'il advienne. Je vous présente cette demande en toute simplicité, encouragé par la générosité avec laquelle vous nous avez aidés.

Veuillez transmettre mes remerciments à tous vos collaborateurs et croire, cher Monsieur Galatti, à l'expression de mes très reconnaissants sentiments.

(signed)
A. Sice

* * *

Subject: - Missing A.F.S Personnel and Vehicles.

HQ 2 NZ DIV
M(Div) 1/5

11 Jul 42

Dear Colonel Richmond,

I greatly regret to have to inform you that of the twenty men and ambulance cars attached to 2 NZ DIV three men and two cars are missing. There is strong presumptive evidence that this loss occurred during an engagement with enemy forces on the night of June 27, 1942.

In an action at MINGAR QUAIM the 2 NZ DIV was surrounded by enemy tank forces and had to fight its way out at night. Several NZ and AFS cars carrying wounded came out with the forces. Three NZ cars were destroyed, one APS car hit by a high explosive shell and destroyed and a second AFS car probably hit.

On summing up after the melee it was found that Messrs. BELSHAW, SANDERS, and MITCHELL together with two cars were unaccounted for.

It is a possibility that one of the drivers may have received injuries when his car was hit but unfortunately I cannot give you more definite information than that the men are missing, probably prisoners of war. I hope you will convey my sincere sympathy to the relatives of these men.

I would like to take this opportunity of expressing to you and through you to all your officers and men, my very deep and sincere appreciation of the excellent work they have done and are continuing to do for the New Zealand Division,

All have been keen to be where the battle is thickest, and their invaluable help has not only simplified the evacuation of casualties, but has enabled wounded to be operated on much earlier and has thus greatly enhanced their chances of recovery.

Once again on behalf of the NZ Forces I thank you.

Yours faithfully,

(signed)
G.A. Ardagh
COLONEL NZMS
ADMS 2 NZ DIVE.

* * *

WENDELL L. WILLKIE
15 Broad Street
New York, N.Y.

August 10, 1942

My dear Mr. Galatti:

The unselfish and vital work being done by American Volunteer ambulance drivers on the all-important Libyan and Egyptian battlefronts is familiar to every American. Stories of their heroism and daring in bringing aid to the wounded have already become proud legends of this War. The American Field Service has done a splendid job in its operation of this life-saving work and American men on these battlefronts, they, too, may count on being supported by such a fine forces

Good luck to you,

Sincerely yours,

(signed)
Wendell L. Willkie

* * *

HQ ENZ DIV
5 Oct. 42

Officer Commanding
American Field Service
General Headquarters, Middle East

My dear Colonel Richmond,

It has been my intention to write to you ever since the 2 N.Z. Division came out of the line, but unfortunately this has been delayed by a short spell in Hospital,

The purpose of this letter is not a mere polite acknowledgement of services but a desire to express a genuinely sincere and warm appreciation of everything done by the Officers and men of your Service whom we consider it an honor to have had. with us.

The two and a half months of this happy association were difficult and strenuous for all, but they served to establish a firm bond between your men and our own.

Casualties amongst AFS men inevitably occurred but considering the eager way in which AFS driver persistently volunteer to "get in amongst it", I think we may consider it fortunate that losses were not heavier.

The truest judges of worth are the soldiers themselves and in this respect I can assure you that our own drivers with whom your men worked, all officers and men of the N.Z. Medical Services and most important of all, the wounded, expressed nothing but admiration and praise for the AFS.

These sentiments I most heartily endorse, and on behalf of the GOC and members of the 2 N.Z, Division I would once again express our deepest gratitude to the Officers and men of the AFS as a result of whose tireless service, so many New Zealand lives have undoubtedly been saved.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
P.A. Ardagh, Colonel, NZMS

* * *

BRITISH EMBASSY
WASHINGTON, D. C.
December 8th, 1942

Dear Mr. Galatti,

I have just been looking at some figures giving the service record of the men of the First Unit of the American Field Service Ambulance which went, a year ago, to our Eighth Army in the Middle East, at the original request of General Sir Archibald Wavell.

I must send you a line of warm congratulation on the splendid record of this unit, particularly at Bir Hacheim, Tobruk, and El Alamein.

It is interesting to see what a very representative body of men they were, coming as they did from twenty-two States of the Union and forty universities and colleges. I am sure you know how much their work has been appreciated but I cannot refrain from adding a personal line of congratulation.

Yours, sincerely,

(signed)
Halifax

* * *

Le Général de Gaulle 4 Carleton Gardens
No 2819 /CAB Le 11 dec. 1942

Monsieur le Directeur,

"Je tiens à vous exprimer combien j'apprécie les services rendus par l'"American Field Service" à la France.

Dès le début de la campagne de 1940, vos ambulances transportaient nos blessés sous le feu de l'ennemi, come pendant l'autre guerre. Voue étiez à nos côtés en Syrie, puis en Lybie. A Bir Hacheim, vous étiez présents aussi; deux morts, trois blessés, deux prisonniers et un disparu, pris sur l'effectif de vingt et une ambulances, témoignant de l'actif devouement avec lequel l''American Field Service" s'est dépensé pour la France Combattante.

Je vous prie de partager avec les familles de ceux que vous avez perdus, mes condoléance émues. La France n'oubliera pas ses amis d'Amérique qui ont fait volontairement pour elle le sacrifice de leur vie.

Veuillez agréer, Monsieur le Directeur, l'expression de mes sentiments distingués,

(signed)
C. de Gaulle

* * *

HEADQUARTERS
Service of Supply
United States Army Forces in the Middle East
Office of the Ordinance Officer

Commanding Officer,
American Field Service,
G.H.Q.M.E.F.
Cairo, Egypt
January 4, 1943

Dear Sir,

1 Realizing your continued interest in former members of your Command, this Headquarters would like at this time to inform you of the excellent service being performed by approximately thirty former members of the of the American Field Service who were employed by the United States Army for duty in Asmara Arsenal, Asmara Eritrea. High Ranking Officers of this Arsenal have been enthusiastic in their praise of the effort being put forth by these men and have expressed a desire for as many more as we are able to employ. The work these men are doing is varied in nature and although a long way from the front line, it is a very important part of our War effort in this theatre,

2. This Headquarters will continue to interview with a view of placing in Asmara Arsenal any or all members of the American Field Service who are released by you and elect to follow their former comrades to Eritrea.

Sincerely,

(signed)
S.W. Connelly,
Lt.Col. Ord.Dept.
Ordinance officer

* * *

(Excerpt from an INS news dispatch written by correspondent George Lait)

WITH THE BRITISH EIGHTH ARMY at GABES, April 8 --43

There are literally thousands of Montgomery's men who are alive today thanks to American Field Service volunteer American ambulance drivers piloting American-made ambulances donated by American funds.

* * *

BRITISH JOINT STAFF MISSION
OFFICES OF THE COMBINED CHIEFS OF STAFF
WASHINGTON

25th May, 1943

Dear Mr. Galatti,

I was very pleased to have the opportunity of meeting you to-day and discussing the participation of the American Field Service in future Indian Army operations. Your offer to supply personnel for an Ambulance Company amounting to two hundred and fifty men is much appreciated and I know that they will be of great value to my Army.

I well recall the original offer of four hundred ambulances and drivers made to me as Commander-In-Chief, Middle East Forces, by the American Field Service in May 1941.

Although I had left Egypt too soon to have your men under my command, the reports that I received fully justified the promises made that the American Field Service could do a good job in the Middle East, and I am confident that they will render equally valuable service in India.

I understand the advance party is at present enroute and I look forward to the early arrival of the full company

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
A.P. Wavell

* * *

Medical Directorate
G.H.Q.
M.E.F.
July 28, 1943.

Col. R.S. Richmond, A.F.S.
H.Q.A.F.S. GHQ. MEF
66

Dear Richmond,

The following paragraph appears in a report by the A.D.M.S., 4 Ind. Div., relating to the Tunisian campaign:

It is desired to place on record the gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by the drivers of the American Field Service ambulance cars attached to the Division.

I would like to record my own appreciation of the good work your men continue to do in the forward areas. It is most heartening to know the old spirit still lives,

(signed)
W.C. Hartgill
Major General
D.M.S.

* * *

MESSAGE TO AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE HEADQUARTERS, MIDDLE EAS

On the occasion of the fourth anniversary of the establishment of the American Field Service in this war may I take the opportunity of expressing my gratitude and that of my Army for the invaluable work they have performed. They have marched with us over many miles and have never railed to render invaluable and efficient service. I am most grateful for their help.

(signed)
General Montgomery

* * *

GHQ MEF
43686/ AG1
Sept. 43.

From: General Sir Henry M. Wilson

My dear Colonel,

On the fourth anniversary of the formation of the American Field Service, I wish to congratulate all members on the valuable and important work they have performed since AFS Units commenced operating with the British Forces.

The excellent work all members of the AFS have done has, I am glad to note, been reflected to some extent, by the honors already awarded during the present hostilities. You personally must feel very proud to command a Unit that has throughout the triumphant North African campaign been connected with the Eighth Army,

Will you please convey my appreciation of the good work performed, to all members of AFS now serving in the MEF.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
H.M. Wilson

* * *

The White House
Washington

September 14, 1943

Dear Mr. Galatti:

Almost four years ago, well before the United States entered the present war, the American Field Service reviewed its impressive record of 1914-1918, reorganized its forces, and began again the work of sending a corps of young Americans overseas to operate ambulances in war areas.

Since the reorganization of the Service on September 29,1939, its men have seen bitter action and worked under heavy fire, always with valor, beside the forces of the French and the British. Serving voluntarily and largely at their own expense, they have saved thousands upon thousands of lives that the Allied forces might grow larger and stronger, and that the day of victory might be hastened.

As these men approach the fourth anniversary of their service in this war, I wish to congratulate them, to thank them, and to give expression to the admiration in which they are held by our people.

In serving our Allies, they serve America

Very sincerely yours,

(signed)
Franklin D. Roosevelt

* * *

American Field Service
60 Beaver Street
New York, N.Y.

September 27, 1943.

FOLLOWING MESSAGE RECEIVED ON FOURTH ANNIVERSARY AT MIDDLE EAST HEADQUARTERS --

AMBULANCE DRIVERS AFS PLACED DISPOSITION MEDICAL SERVICES FIGHTING FRENCH GIVEN COMPLETE SATISFACTION DURING TUNISIAN CAMPAIGN AND WHILE STATIONED IN TRIPOLI.

THEIR WORK MUCH APPRECIATED BY VARIOUS MEDICAL OFFICERS UNDER WHOSE ORDERS THEY HAVE SERVED

(signed)
MAJOR MONTFORT
Director-Medical Services
Forces Françaises Libres

* * *

BRITISH JOINT STAFF MISSION
OFFICES OF THE COMBINED CHIEFS OF STAFF
WASHINGTON, D.C.

16th October 1943

Dear Mr. Galatti,

Colonel Benson tells me that the American Field Service, whose volunteers have done such splendid work with the Eighth Army during two years of North African campaigning has just celebrated the Fourth Anniversary of its services in this war. The value of these services is shown by the fact that not only is the strength of the Ambulance companies being maintained, but a new company has now been provided for operations in Burma; moreover, I was delighted to hear the other day that the first platoon from North Africa has arrived in Italy.

Having followed with the closest interest the work of your volunteers I should like to congratulate and thank them through you for their splendid spirit and for the services that they have rendered to our wounded, services which will not easily be forgotten by my countrymen.

No small share of the success of the American Field Service is, I feel sure, due to your untiring energy and that of your Headquarters staff,

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
Field Marshall Sir J.C. Dill

* * *

MESSAGE OF CONGRATULATION

The A.D.M.S. wishes to congratulate all personnel concerned on the rapid and successful evacuation of over one hundred wounded across the GARIGLIANO on the night 11/12 Feb. 44.

(signed)
W. Davis, Major R.A.M.C.
Comd. 'A' Coy- 185 Fd Amb.

* * *

From:- Major General W.R.C. Penney CBE., DSO., MC.

Headquarters,
1st Br Division
C.M.F.
Feb 44

Dear

I want to let you know just how well Mr. Baylies and his ambulance drivers have done since they joined the 1st Division for the Anzio operation.

They have met all calls, never spared themselves and have set an example of gallant and loyal service which has earned the admiration and gratitude of all who have witnessed it.

With very many thanks and all good wishes for the future of your organization. I am proud to have had the detachment with us.

Yours very sincerely

23/2

Cat. Carleton R. Richmond, Jr,, AFS
Det 485 (AFS) Amb Car Coy,
c/o HQ 57 Area, CMF

* * *

No. 14 CANADIAN GENERAL HOSPITAL

R.C.A.M.C. - C.A., C.M.F.

28 February, 1944.

  Officer Commanding,
485 Company,
American Field Service.
Volunteer D. Burke
  C. Craig
  F. Rogers
  H. Baker
  L. Messerschmidt
  H. Blair

1 The marginally-named Volunteers are being withdrawn from this Station tomorrow and it is felt that a note of commendation and appreciation would be in order at this time.

2. The American Field Service ambulances have greatly facilitated the transport arrangements at this Station and the Volunteers who have been attached to this Unit have been most cooperative and helpful at all times. The cheerful and willing spirit always shown by the Volunteers in the performance of their duties has been greatly appreciated by all ranks of this Unit.

3. May we express our appreciation of the American Field service and our thanks to the Volunteers who have been attached to this Unit.

(signed)
(H. Gordon Young) Colonel
Officer Commanding

* * *

From: Major General Sir Ernest Cowell K.B.E., C.B., D.S.O., T.D.

ALLIED FORCE HEADQUARTERS
OFFICE OF THE SURGEON

----------------------------------------------------

Ref: - M.3392

To: Colonel Richmond
Commanding A.F.S. Units,
c/o D.D.M.S.,
A.C.M.F. Admin. Echelon
C.M. F.

--------------------------------------------------

On my recent tour of the front I have again seen for myself the splendid work done by the drivers and ambulance cars of the A.F.S.

Will you please convey to all concerned my thanks and warm appreciation of the splendid work done, untiring zeal and loyal devotion displayed by all.

We are very grateful for the assistance your organization is rendering to the Medical Services of the British Army.

(signed)
E.M. Cowell
Major General
Surgeon, D.M.S., A.F.H.Q

29 Feb 44

* * *

From: Major General Sir Ernest M. Cowell K.B.E. C.B., D.S.O

Office of the Surgeon
Allied Force Headquarters
British North African Force
29 Feb 44

----------------------------------------

Dear Mr. Galatti:

I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my deep appreciation of the splendid work done by members of your organization under the command of Allied Force Headquarters,

I have on more than one occasion seen the drivers work at the very front under fire and performing their task with cheerfulness, courage and devotion

These men with their vehicles have been instrumental in saving many lives. They live under hard conditions but do not grumble and never complain.

We are very grateful for the assistance your organization is rendering to the Medical Services of the British Army.

I am yours sincerely,

(signed)
E.M. Cowell

* * *

Lieut-General Sir Oliver W.H. Leese, Bt.,
G.O.C. EIGHTH ARMY

23 April 44

My dear Colonel Richmond,

I am delighted to hear that the War Office have authorised the wearing of the Africa Star by all members of your AFS Units, on the same terms as the British personnel.

The work done by your Units since May 42, when they first joined the Eighth Army at GAZALA has been of the utmost value.

I hope that you will continue with us until we reach BERLIN.

Yours ever

(signed)
Oliver Leese

* * *

H. Q., A.A.I.
C. M. F.____
8 May 44.

PERSONAL MESSAGE FROM BRIGADIER
R.W. GALLOWAY, C.B.E., D.S.O,,
                  D.D.M.S., A.A.I.

Before leaving to take up an appointment in U.K., I wish to thank all ranks of the Medical and Nursing Services of A.A.I. for their hard work and loyal co-operation during the difficult period since the occupation of Italy.

Big battles have been fought, casualties have been heavy and the hospitals have been working at crisis expansion for long periods without extra staff.

In addition, Medical and Nursing Officers volunteered to assist in the care of civilian typhus, cases during the epidemic in Naples.

They also did invaluable work for the Yugo-Slav Refugees and are now running hospitals for the Yugo-Slav National Army of Liberation.

By their devotion to duty and grand spirit, all difficulties have been successfully overcome and the wounded and sick well cured for at all times.

I also wish to thank all ranks of the M,A.Cs and A.C.Cs --- both American Field Service and R.A.S.C. for the excellent work they have done.

(signed)
(R.W. Galloway)
Brigadier,
D.D.M,S., A.A.I.

* * *

H.Q. 5 KRESOWA INF DIV
May 1944

Dear Major,

I wish to thank all personnel of the American Field Service who have worked with my Division, for their outstanding performance in maintaining unbroken the flow of evacuation of wounded.

The work has been heavy, but the drivers of your ambulances have never failed us and many of our wounded undoubtedly owe their lives to them.

Even when our MDS was forced to move by enemy shelling and threatened with disorganization by casualties to the start, the evacuation of wounded was uninterrupted owing to the rapid transfer and re-setting up of equipment. The untiring assistance rendered by the American Field Service on this occasion was invaluable.

I am most grateful for the willing help and collaboration we have received from you.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
Major General

* * *

Rear HQ 2 Polish Corps CMF
9 June 1944

Dear Major Snead,

I would like to offer to you and to your entire staff our very sincere thanks for their very valuable assistance during the recent operations, and especially to Lieut. MURRAY and the drivers of "D" platoon, for the devoted way in which they carried out their work.

All our men have expressed the highest appreciation of their services throughout, and the success of our scheme of evacuation was in no small way due to their efforts.

I hope that we may have the opportunity of working together again in the future.

Yours very sincerely,

D.D.M.3. 2 Polish Corps. CMF

(signed)
Dr. Dietrich
Colonel

* * *

Confidential.
No. 185536 A1
Rear HQ. 11 Army Group,
DELHI 16 Oct. 44

Subject: American Field Service

To: - HQ., Fourteenth Army.

-------------------------------

The following Censorship extract from a letter written by a British NCO in 33 Corps, to a friend in the U.K, is forwarded for your information and communication to the OC American Field Service.

The C. in C. wishes to add his appreciation to that of this unsolicited testimonial.

We have the Yankee boys here, but only in the capacity of American Field Amb. All Volunteers and a finer set of boys I never wish to meet. They're bringing our lads back wounded at a speed of about 5 m.p.h. absolutely slow and steady, whether shell or bomb was falling --- not a bump, whereas other drivers go crashing along and the poor injured lads on the stretchers are bumped all over. Yes, to do a stretch of winding road of over a 100 miles at a steady 5 m.p.h. wants some doing --- and they did it; chaps say it was like riding in a Pullman."

S d/x       x       x Lt. Col.
for General, C-in-C. II Army Gp.

* * *

Allied Force Headquarters
Office of the Surgeon,
Central Mediterranean Force,
21st December, 1944.
---------------------------

Dear Colonel Galatti, --------------------

"-------------------------I would like to assure you of our unfailing gratitude for the splendid service your drivers are giving us. The conditions in the forward areas are vile in the extreme ---what with disrupted roads, foul weather, and a vicious enemy; but nothing daunts these drivers in their determination to get the casualties back ---whatever the difficulties. We are indeed proud of their record of devotion to the cause of the sick and wounded,.------------------"

Yours very sincerely

(signed)
(W.C. Hartgill)
Major-General
Surgeon, D.M.S.

* * *

ALLIED FORCES HEADQUARTERS
OFFICE OF THE SURGEON
-------------------------------

Colonel Richmond, Commanding,
American Field Service, c/o HQ, 56 Area, CMF
----------------------------------------------------------------

This, almost certainly being the last occasion on which Christmas will find us still at war in Europe, I would like to take the opportunity of thanking all ranks of the Motor Ambulance Convoys, Motor Ambulance Sections, and of the Ambulance Car Companies --- not forgetting our gallant friends of the American Field Service ---.for the splendid service they have given to their sick and wounded comrades,

Through long and exhausting hours, under the most arduous conditions of disrupted roads, of foul weather and often under the hazards of enemy fire, they have carried on undaunted in their devotion to those committed to their charge,

I am indeed proud of their share in the work of the Medical Services and I wish them all a Merry Christmas and the best of luck and happiness in the New Year,

(signed)
W.C.Hartgill, Major-General
Surgeon, D.M.S., A.F.H.Q.

21 Dec. 44

* * *

REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE
Liberté - Egalité - Fraternité

GOUVERNEMENT MILITAIRE DE PARIS
Etat-Major Particulier
No 361 GMP/CAP

Paris, Le 31 janvier 1945

Le Général de Corps d'Armée KOENIG
Gouverneur Militaire de Paris

à

M. le Représentant de l' "American Field Service"
auprès de l'Armée FRANÇAISE

Je viens d'apprendre, avec une très vive satisfaction, que trois sections de l' "American Field Service" se trouvaient de nouveau à la disposition des armées françaises

La première section, attachée au 433e Bataillon Médical, est en action dans les Vosges depuis octobre 1944. Deux de ses volontaires ont été blessés au feu, et trois de ses voitures - ambulances détruites par le tir d'artillerie ennemi.

La deuxième section est rattachée au 431e Bataillon Médical.

La troisième section fait partie du 8e Bataillon Médical. Comme leur ainée, ces deux sections sont rattachées à des divisions françaises qui se battent dans l'Est,

A ma connaissance, sept citations, avec Croix de Guerre, ont été décernées pour faits de bravoure au feu à des volontaires de la première section, entre autres à l'officier commandant l' "Amerlcan Field Service" en France, le Major C.H. Coster.

L' "American Field Service" a, dans l'armée française, des titres de noblesse qui remontent à la Grande Guerre 1914-1918. Il était à nos côtés en 1939 à Beauvais. Mais je ne puis oublier, et les soldats de la France Libre avec moi, que l' "American Field Service", maintenant de retour dans une France libérée, a voulu servir à nos côtés pendant les années sombres,

Au Levant en 1941, en Libye, en Cyrénaïque et en Tripolitaine en 1942 et 19:43, il nous a fourni une aide très appréciée: les volontaires des Vosges et d'Alsace sont les dignes successeurs des volontaires héroïques qui à Bir Hacheim et à El Alamein, ramassèrent sous les balles et les bombardements leurs camarades français, et mériterent les plus hautes distinctions pour leur bravoure.

Je tenais à vous dire cela comme on acquitte une dette de gratitude.

Croyez-moi sincèrement votre

(signed)
KOENIG
(Seal:) Gouvernement Militaire de Paris
Le Général

* * *

A.D.M.S. 5 Kres, Inf. Div.
--------------------------------
O.C.A.F.S. in Italy
31 Jan 1945

Dear Sir:

After the changement of the platoon "D" by "B" platoon 485 A.F.S company --- I wish to send to you my thanks and avowals for the hard work which "D" platoon did during the time from 15.x.1944 to 31.1.1945 working with my medical troops. Their bravery and sacrifice saved the lives of many Polish soldiers,

Yours sincerely,

A.D.M.S. 5 Keres, Inf. Div.

(signed)
Dr. Kaczanowski, Major
P.A.M.C.

* * *

30 Hyde Park Gate
London, S.W. 7
14th February, 1945

My dear Director General,

I am writing to tell you that I have just returned from a visit to India and Burma and while in Burma I saw one of the American Field Service units at work, and I would like you to know how very much the work they have done for us in that theatre of war is appreciated by the Commanders of the Forces there. I saw what a fine company of men you had collected and I was not at all surprised to hear the. accounts of the gallantry and devotion with which they had carried out their arduous job. It was a great pleasure to meet them and I am sure you yourself must be very proud of the work they have done.

With kindest regards,

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
Alex Hood.

* * *

SPECIAL MESSAGE FROM
THE
ARMY COMMANDER
To All Ranks
567 Ambulance Car Company, (American Field Service)

The time has come for you to leave the Eighth Army. Before you go, I want to congratulate and thank you all for the part you have played in the sequence of great successes which have brought the Eighth Army from Egypt to the plains of Lombardy.

Team work is the secret of success in waging war. Each man is a member at the team and each man is responsible for the results. With Eighth Army the results are plain for all to see. In Africa we defeated a skilled and determined enemy, and we pursued him from Egypt to Tunis. In Italy we have driven him from some of the strongest natural positions imaginable, and back across some of the most difficult campaigning country in the world: and we have caused him irreplaceable losses.

You leave at a time when we can look forward with confidence to an early and final victory over the Germans. To this and you have already contributed decisively, and whatever the future may bring I am confident that your progress will be as distinguished as it has been in the past while serving with the Eighth Army.

Good luck to you all.

(signed)
R.L. McCreery
Lieut-General
G.O.C. Eighth Army

Main HQ
Eighth Army
March 1945

* * *

Officer Commanding
No. 152 Squadron
Royal Air Force
India
19th February, 1945

Dear Lieutenant Fenn,

Please permit me to offer to you and all the men serving under you some expression of our gratitude for the really magnificent work done by all personnel under your command during the Bomb incident on the 13th February, 1945.

At night, within four minutes of being asked you turned out the six ambulances requested. Your Medical Orderlies and Drivers performed a rapid and sterling service, and in this one night were responsible for the saving of many lives. Many of the injured men have been our comrades on this Squadron for over four years and we are correspondingly grateful.

It is such turnouts, and such work performed with such spirit that will. bind the friendship of our two countries. Believe me, Sir, I remain in deep gratitude.

Yours sincerely,

Sd............................
(Grant Kerr) S Ldr. (DFC)
Officer Commanding ,
no. 152 Squadron, R.A.F.

* * *

3191404. Pte. .C. Cleghorn
1st Bn London Scottish
C.M.F.
19th Feb. 1945.

Dear Sir:

On behalf of my friends and myself I would like to express the sincere admiration which we have for the members of the American Field Service, whilst serving in our unit, to write all their gallant exploits would take too long, so we hope by this short letter the people of America will appreciate the good work that these volunteers are doing.

We ourselves belong to an Infantry Unit and we have had the good fortune of having one or two of your drivers attached to us, during that time not one has ever failed in currying out his duty, even under the most trying circumstances, --- I myself, have seen them carrying on for days without sleep, evacuating wounded, their cheerfulness during these operations was an inspiration to many a wounded soldier. I also think that during that time they did a great deal to bring about a closer Anglo-American relationship, even now I think we are much closer than ever before.

Infantry men are supposed to be hard-boiled, but we still take our hats off to the men of the A.F.S. each time we talk of them it is with a feeling of pride and admiration.

Many of our American friends have since gone home, namely Steve McInnes, Frank Emmett, Mort Wright, Ken Brennan and a good few others, on behalf of my friends and I we would like to extend our best wishes and thanks for the good work they have done for us during their period with the Eighth Army.

We are at the moment priviledged with having one of your oldest A.F.S. members with us, John Meeker, he is a very loyal member and I should imagine he is the high light of many a British Division.

Before I close, Sir, we would like to wish you and the A.F.S. the very best of luck for the future and I hope that in the days to come you will carry on the good work, of which I am sure you will.

On behalf of the London Scottish Medical Section we extend our best wishes.

I am Sir ,

Yours Sincerely,

R.C. CLEGHORN

* * *

Ire Armée Française
Bataillon Médical No. 431
Ire Cie de Ramassage

S.P. 76979, le 24 Février 45

Le Médecin Commandant MASSEGUIN, cdt
la Ire Compagnie de Ramassage du
Bataillon Médical No. 431

à

Monsieur l'Aspirant, Commandant le
Détachement de l'AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE

Comme suit à l'inspection passée hier, le Février 1945, je suis heureux de vous dire toute ma satisfaction.

Comme je vous l'avais dit à Gerardmer, les 11 voitures sanitaires de la Compagnie, étaient en mauvais état, à cause du travail fait dans les montagnes dos Vosges.

Je suis heureux de voir que non seulement vous avez pu assurer impeccablement votre service mais que vous avez réparé au mieux les voitures et qu'elles sont fort bien entretenues.

Je vous serais reconnaissant de transmettre ces remerciements à votre personnel,

(Signed)
J. MASSEGUIN
(Seal) 432e B.M. -Ie C.R.
Commandant

* * *

Subject: Service

3/16/45

To: G.H.Q. AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE
  56 Area Naples C.M.F.

From: ARC Field Rep, --- Pesaro Province

The writer is Field Representative American Red Cross assigned to A.M.G.

During the past two and one half months units of your organization at rest in the area have been asked to assist in the transport of ill and wounded civilians. The immediate and cheerful response that all requests were met with are, to the writer, indicative of the spirit of service behind the A.F.S. organization.

Vehicles and personnel drove many miles over roads sometimes almost impassable.

In as much as this service was all in addition to regular duties the writer desires to express appreciation end praise for service rendered. It enabled many wounded and ill to receive treatment end care without which recovery would have been doubtful,

W.E. GRAINGER
ARC F.R.

* * *

H.Q. 19 Indian Division,
S.E.A.C.
3 April, 1945.

TO A" PLATOON, American Field Service.

On the conclusion of the Mandalay Campaign, may I send you my own personal thanks and that of the whole of the 19th Indian Division for all the magnificent work you have put in for us.

All of us, of all races end creeds, are more than appreciative of your courage, your patience, and the great care you take of our wounded and sick no matter what the physical difficulties or how heavy the enemy fire.

Thank you very much indeed.

(signed)
T.W. Rees,
Major General
19th Indian Division

Flash of 19th (Dagger) Indian Division

All "A" Platoon men have been made honorary members of the 19th Division by General Roes and also given permission to wear the Division flash.

* * *

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Washington, D.C.

Committee: MILITARY AFFAIRS.
7 May, 1945.

Dear Major Payne:

It was certainly a pleasure to be able to visit you in the field so that I might see for myself the great contribution which the American Field Service has made toward the cause of Anglo-American understanding and cooperation. Everything that I saw confirmed statements made to me by officers of the Eighth Army with whom I had talked, that the American Field Service was indeed the first actual step toward establishing Anglo-American relations in the early days of this war and that ever since it has been constantly of the greatest value in cementing them.

I know that I cannot express to you the gratitude of the American people for the services you have rendered internationally, because you and your men undertook this mission voluntarily, serving world interests for your country without desire or hope of any gain or recognition. Nevertheless, it must be a great satisfaction for you to know that your work is appreciated and that it will bear fruit for a long time to come in the growth of friendship between all English-speaking peoples and their allies.

I shall be most happy in telling people over here of your good work over there for the United States.

Sincerely,

(signed)
CLARE BOOTHE LUCE

* * *

Officer Commanding
American Field Service
Coy 567, Platoon C
---------------------------------

I should like to express my appreciation of the most excellent done by your personnel at this camp. This has been no easy task and one that has had to be done against time, and against the risk of infection with typhus. I cannot speak too highly of your men for whom no job was too difficult or too risky.

(J.A.D. Johnston, Lt. Col. RAMC
OC 32 Brit CCS Gp)
SMO Belsen Concentration. Camp

BLA
20 May 45

* * *

SPECIAL ORDER OF THE DAY
By Lieut Colonel M.I Gonin, RAMC

I wish to thank all ranks of the 11(Br) Light Field Ambulance and every member of 567 Coy American Field Service Unit who have worked with us so closely, for what you have done since coming to BELSEN Concentration Camp on 17 April 1945.

...........

You undertook what, for this unit, was the thankless and unspectacular task of clearing BELSEN concentration camp. Our American friends and yourselves, with the B.R.C.S., have moved well over 11,000 sick from BELSEN. To do this, you have worked for a month amid the most unhygienic conditions inside huts where the majority of internees were suffering from the most virulent disease known to man, You have had to deal with mass hysteria and political complication requiring the tact of diplomats and firmness of senior officers. During the first ten days in the Concentration Camp and before any organized attempt had been made to feed the sick in those huts you distributed 4,000 meals twice daily from what could be scrounged by initiative and subtlety.

By collecting medical equipment from all over Germany you produced a dispensary which has supplied drugs for 13,000 patients a day and has met the demands of excitable medical officers of all races requiring the most exotic drugs in half a dozen different languages. You have, without hesitation, acted as undertakers, collecting over 2,000 corpses from the wards of the hospital area and removing them to the Mortuary --- a task which the RAMC can never before have been asked to fulfill,

Life can never be quite the same again for those who worked in the Concentration Camp, but you will go with the knowledge that the 11(Br) Lt. Fd. Amb. has once again done a good job.

Brig. H.L. Glyn Hughes, CBE DS0 MC and Lt. Col. J.A.D. Johnston, MO, SMO BELSEN Camp, join me in thanking you all for the part you have played in achieving the Impossible.

(M.W.Gonin) Lieut Colonel RAMC
Commanding No U (Br) Light Field Ambulance.

BELSEN
23 May 45

* * *

Ière Armée Française
Direction du Service de Santé
No. 12805 DSS/T2

P.C., le 55 mai, 1945.

Le Médecin Général Inspecteur
GUIRRIEC, Directeur de Service de
Santé de la Ière Armée Française

à

Monsieur le Commandant Coster
Chef de l'American Field Service.

Mon Cher Commandant,

Vous avez bien voulu, par votre lettre du 18 mai, 1945, me faire part du prochain repatriement du personnel des sections de l'American Field Service.

Dès réception de cette lettre, les ordres ont été donnés pour que ce personnel soit regroupé à Baden-Baden et à Dietingen (431e et 433e B.M.)

Au moment où vous et vos compatriotes allez regagner les Etats-Unis, il m'est particulièrement agréable de rendre hommage aux qualités de courage, d'endurance et de dévouement dont les ambulanciers américains ont fait preuve au cours de la campagne 1944-45.

Toujours présents aux côtés de leurs camarades français, ils ont participé avec calme et courage à toutes les opérations qui ont moné la Ière Armée Française des bords de la Méditerranée aux montagnes du Tyrol.

Le Service de Santé de la Ière Française est heureux et fier d'avoir compté dans ses rangs de si brillants et courageux représentants de la Grande Nation Alliée.

Les citations et décorations qui ont récompensé les plus belles actions ne souligneront jamais assez combien a été précieux pour nous, le généreux concours que les Volontaires de l'A.F.S. nous ont spontanément apporté.

Nous garderons pieusement le souvenir de ceux tombés auprès des nôtres, pieusement, au champ d'honneur.

Malgré les regrets que votre départ entraîne après de longs mois de travail et de luttes communes, je vous adresse pour vous et vos hommes, mes souhaits très sincères de joyeux et prompt retour dans vos foyers et je vous prie de transmettre à tous, mes chaleureuses felicitations et l'expression de ma reconnaissance,

Croyez, Mon cher Commandant, que je suis très sincèrement heureux de vous rendre les sentiments de gratitude que vous avez bien voulu me témoigner avec tant de cordialité. Votre nom restera inséparablement lié a ceux de mes collaborateurs de la Direction du Service de Santé avec lesquels vous avez vécu les heures inoubliables des campagnes de France et d'Allemagne qui nous ont menés à la Victoire.

* * *

TAG HEADQUARTERS
21 Army Group,
B.L.A.
16 June, 1945,

Dear Hoeing,

You are shortly leaving this theatre to go to SEAC. Before you go I should like to thank you and all your unit for the fine work which you have done in this theatre,

I have known the American Field Service since I took command of the Eighth Army in 1942. You were with me from El Alamein to Tunis, and again in Italy, and now you have served with me during this campaign in North Western Europe. This fine Volunteer service has throughout done a first class job of work, of which you can all be justly proud.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
B.L. Montgomery,
Field Marshall.

* * *

HEADQUARTERS.
EIGHTH ARMY
C.M.F.

From Lieut-General Sir Richard L McCreery

9th July, 1945.

A/c930

Dear Mr. Galatti:

Now that the last American Field Service Unit has left my Army, I want to express to you my warmest thanks and appreciation of the splendid work which the men of the American Field Service Units have done with the Eighth Army throughout the Italian campaign. No words of mine can express adequately the admiration and gratitude that All Ranks of the Eighth Army have for your men. At all times of the year, often in the most difficult mountainous country, in snow or deep mud, the American Field Service men have always got to our wounded, and have succeeded in evacuating them quickly and safely. Special mobile detachments of troops in areas without roads have always wanted ambulances of an American Field Service unit with them, and a great spirit of comradeship has been built up between our soldiers. I hope that the many friendships which have been made will continue, and will be a source of strength to our two Countries in the days to come.

Yours very sincerely

(signed) R.L. McCreery
Lieut-General

* * *

SOUTH EAST ASIA COMMAND HEADQUARTERS

22nd July, 1945.

Dear Mr. Galatti:

I want to tell you how greatly I value the work of the American Field Service in this Command.

It was Field Marshall Wavell who first asked the Field Service to form an ambulance unit to help in the forward evacuation work of the Burma campaign.

The Field Marshal knew what he was talking about, for your people had been with the Eighth Army in the Middle East.

The Field Service Unit joined the 14th Army late on in 1943, and since then I believe that it has served with every Division in that now famous Army. Seven volunteers lost their lives. A number were wounded. And not so long ago, at the Rangoon Victory Parade Investiture, I had the great pleasure of presenting to Lieutenant Neil Gilliam the George Medal, the highest British award for bravery for which a non-British civilian is eligible.

In these Field Service volunteers, you have sent us some of the best Ambassadors that ever left the States.

I hope that the work of the Field Service is as well known in America as it deserves to be.

Yours Sincerely

(signed)
Louis Mountbatten

* * *

Dominion of New Zealand

OFFICE OF MINISTER OF FINANCE
WELLINGTON N.Z.

10th August, 1945

Mr. Stephen Galatti,
Director General,
American Field Service,
60 Beaver Street,
New York 4, N.Y.

Dear Mr. Galatti,

This note is sent in acknowledgement of the one that you wrote under date of 16th July notifying the withdrawal of your Field Service volunteers from the European theatre and I am glad to note that your organization is still to carry on its good work with the British troops under the South East Asia Command,

It was a great privilege to be associated with your men and we are proud of the work that your organization has done among the New Zealand forces at different places in North Africa and Italy.

With every good wish,

I am,

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
NASH

* * *

THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON

September 10, 1945

Dear Mr. Galatti:

The impressive record of the American Field Service in the saving of thousands of lives both in this war and in World War I has won the admiration of everyone who has seen this organization in action.

From 1914 until the end of the first World War the members of the American Field Service, serving voluntarily and largely at their own expense, made an enviable name for themselves because of their loyal devotion to duty and their valorous conduct under fire.

Reorganized September 29th, 1939, the American Field Service again resumed its task of rescuing the wounded on the battlefields of Africa, Italy and France The many decorations awarded its members and the high casualty rate incurred are eloquent evidence that the organization has lived up to the high traditions it established in the last war.

On the occasion of your sixth anniversary in this war, I voice the gratitude of the nation for the outstanding contribution the American Field Service has made in aiding the wounded soldiers who fought for our Allied victory.

Very sincerely yours,

(signed)
HARRY S TRUMAN

* * *

HEADQUARTERS U.S. MARINE CORPS
Washington

Sep. 12, 1945

Dear Sir:

The U.S. Marine Corps recognizes, and counts in computation of points towards demobilization, service in the American Field Service.

While the Marine Corps has never had direct contact with your splendid organization, the importance of your work is fully appreciated.

Sincerely yours,

A.A. Vandergrift
General, U.S.M.C.
Commandant of the Marine Corps.

* * *

D.O.No.2849/6/M
Medical Branch
Headquarters, Fourteenth Army
South East Asia Command
12th September 1945

Dear Marsh:

Now that the time has come for our long association to be ended, I feel sure that I must, before you go, convey to you the deep appreciation, which I share with the whole of the 14th Army, of the gallant and distinguished services rendered by the American Field Service during the Burma campaigns,

The American Field Service has I know covered itself with glory on the other fields but I feel sure that in no other theatre was more valuable and more devoted service given than in Burma.

It is with the greatest regret that I take my leave of you now, and I can assure you that the sentiments of affection and gratitude which the A.F.S. has inspired in me and in my staff are shared not merely by the whole medical service of the 14th Army, but most emphatically by the fighting soldiers of the British, Indian and African forces, whose safety and care has ever been your first consideration.

Yours sincerely

(signed)
G. MacAlevey

Lieut-Colonel W. L. Marsh
American Field Service

* * *

Major W.G.L'A. Erskine,
15th Punjab Regt.,
O.C. Red Cross Bureau,
Belvedere
CALCUTTA
4 Oct. 45

My dear Craven,

A long time ago, a Capt. Humphrey of the American Field Service came to my office and asked for advice and help.

In my then capacity of Deputy Asst. Adj. General I was able, after a deal of work, frustration, and effort, to give him the information and publicised instruction which he needed.

It was such a trifling service that I dismissed it from my mind altogether.

Then I took over this job, the question of finding educated and reliable staff at first seemed insuperable.

Your service came to the rescue, and I found myself in the unique position of being a British Officer with American other ranks serving under my Command.

Now they are leaving me. I already said how greatly distressed I am to lose them.

They have proved that the gallantry they shared in the field was just a reflection of the character which is born into the hearts of these gentlemen.

The. work they were asked to do called for a human understanding, far beyond the capacity of the average soldier. They discharged their duty wonderfully.

For fear of leaving out even one man I cannot praise individuals. However, I ask you to bring to the attention of the H.Q. of the American Field Service in the U.S.A. and if possible to the American Press, the fact that your ranks have done an outstanding humanitarian job, and that I, representing those British Officers and other ranks who have the good fortune to work with them, am profoundly grateful.

Please tell all the boys that they have performed a worth-while duty in a manner which does credit to their nation, their faith, and above all to themselves.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
W.G.L'A. Erskine, Major
Red Cross Information Bureau

* * *

From: General Sir William J. Slim, KCB, CBE, DSO, MG.

No. 10093 MS
HQ Allied Land Forces,
South East Asia
4th October, 1945

Dear Mr. Galatti:

Now that the war has ended with the conclusion of operations in this Theatre I would like to take the opportunity to place on record my most sincere and grateful appreciation of the outstanding work done by the American Field Service.

Wherever they have been employed, and at their own wish this has always been in the forefront of the battle, they have distinguished themselves by their courage to an extent that has filled their British, Indian and Gurkha comrades with admiration and affection.

Many hundreds of my soldiers owe their lives to the devotion of the American Field Service, and when the Service leaves this Theatre its members will take with them the remembrance and gratitude of all British Empire troops who have served with them.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
W.J. Slim

* * *

Hq. Eastern Command
c/o .12 ABPO. 2 Nov, 1945

Dear Major Crane,

I feel that I cannot allow you to leave India for good without trying to express, in a small way, the appreciation that we all feel for the magnificent work which the American Field service under your command have carried out,

Although I have not had the experience of having your ambulance drivers serve directly under me, I have known them in other theatres of war. Their courage, keenness and their determination to be in the thick of things is well known to me in the battles which took place in Southern Italy, and I am perfectly certain that the same spirit prevailed in your Unit out here in India.

The services that you have rendered to us will, I know, never be forgotten, and I sincerely hope that all those who suffered from wounds or sickness while serving with the British and Indian Army will recover their health.

Wishing you all good luck in the future,

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
N. Carthe
Major General

* * *

From: Lieut.-Genl Gordon Wilson, CB, CBE, MC, KHS, DMS
D.M.S. in India

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, INDIA,
Medical Directorate,
NEW DELHI, G.H.Q. A.P.O.
28 November, 1945.

My dear Craven:

I hear that you are departing from India in the near future.

Although your unit has been serving ALFSEA I have inside knowledge of the splendid work which has been done by the American Field Service. I must record my deep sense of appreciation of the work done by you and your unit, and I ask you to accept my best wishes for the future happiness and success of you all,

Bon Voyage, and "Well Done".

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
G. Wilson

* * *

From: General Ronald F, Adam, Bt., K.C.B., D.S.O., O.B.E.

War Office Annex
Hobart House
Grosvenor Place,
London, S.W.1.

4th December 1945.

My dear Galatti:

Thank you so much for your very kind letter of the 27th of November, and for your cable.

I felt it was the least we could do to give some send off to those very gallant officers and men of the American Field Service who had, at great sacrifice to themselves, contributed so much to relieve the sufferings of British killed and wounded. As you well know, I have always felt that we treated your men none too well but it was quite clear to me that they had enjoyed working with the British Army. I have had many letters of appreciation from Commanders-in-Chief overseas on the work that the American Field Service has done.

It has been invaluable having King here to deal with and I personally much regret the departure of all these men.

Thank you so much again for your very generous letter; it was not a duty, it was a pleasure.

I hope that the American Field Service will be able to let us have nominal rolls of the men and the medals they are entitled to. I promised they would get their medals before anyone else in the British Army. One of the troubles is that although we have issued the ribbons, no one has got down to designing the medals, so there may be some delay.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
R.F. Adam

* * *

Medical Directorate,
G.H.Q. C.M.F.
4th December, 1945.

My dear Galatti:

Many thanks for your letter of 11th September which has reached me after considerable delay. I much appreciate your kindly remarks.

It was with mixed feelings that we watched the departure of the American Field Service from this theatre; gladness, to see so many fine fellows returning to their homes content with a job well done, and sadness, at the breaking up of a body of volunteers who have played so unique and valuable a part in this total world war.

All through the difficult days of the Desert battles and again, throughout the length and breadth of mountainous Italy, in fair weather and foul, these volunteers drove their ambulances right up to the combat troops, never daunted by enemy fire or difficult terrain in their zeal to bring help to their sick and wounded comrades. It is true to say that there are many thousands of British soldiers who owe their limbs, if not their lives, to the wonderful work done by these drivers. Words cannot really express the deep admiration and appreciation of the gallant efforts of the "A.F.S." which lie in the hearts of our men, and of those near and dear to them, and I am certain that these thoughts will ripen into a memory that will be cherished for all time.

Finally, I would like to express to you personally and to all executive officers of the American Field service, our grateful thanks for the unceasing flow of ambulance cars and drivers to this theatre of war; by these gracious and generous acts you have done much to cement the bond of fellowship and goodwill which exists between our two Nations and which augures so well for the future peace of the world,

Yours very sincerely,

(signed)
William C. Hartgill

* * *

Major-General T.C. Thompson
Director of Medical Services
H.Q S.A.C. (Singapore) SEAC
15th December, 1945

My dear Craven,

I hear that you and all your units are shortly off to the U.S.A. and home.

I am directed to convey to you, and to all members of the American Field Service units who have so ably assisted the medical services on the eastern Burma front, the appreciation of the Supreme Allied Commander, South East Asia Command, on the work which you have done. You have done a fine job through thick and thin and have very materially helped the sick and wounded of all nationalities on the eastern front, help which all patients have fully appreciated.

As Director of Medical Services on the eastern front I personally wish to take the opportunity of thanking you and Major March and all the others of your units for the very fine job you have done and for the magnificent help which you have given over the past years to our field casualties. The last time I saw one of the units was down in the Kalewa jungles on the way into Burma in dust and mud. I was then impressed as I had been before, by the happy enthusiastic spirit which carried them through difficulties and dangers, and at times some mud and dust. Their work has been appreciated enormously by all who have come in contact with them. I would be grateful if you would pass on our thanks to all the men who helped us.

I wish you good luck for the future.

Yours sincerely,

(signed)
Treffry O. Thompson

* * *

57 A.F.S. Amb. CAB Coy

C.M.F.

July 31

Dear Colonel,

I wish to express on behalf of all the R.A.S.C. & A.C.C. men attached to this unit, our appreciation of the thought which resulted in the present of a wallet to each of us. We shall, we hope, be able to all them with stirling notes in the near future.

They are, I feel, a reminder of more than the friends which we have all made amongst Field Service men, they are a reminder that we, who knew so little of each other's ways of life before the war, have been able to work in amicable and I think efficient partnership for so long,

Once again, thank you.

Yours sincerely,

Webb

* * *

Government of India
Information Services
2107 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington 8, D.C..

April 1, 1946

C-IN-C PRAISES AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE'S WORK

Speaking at the end of the Victory Parade in Delhi on March 9th, the Commander-in-Chief in India, General Sir Claude Auchinleck, paid tribute to the work of the American Field Service.

General Auchinleck expressed his regret that no members of the Service were able to participate in the March.

"I am sorry," the C-in-C said, that no members of the American Field Service were available to take part in the parade. This small., independent, voluntary organization which, in 1939 as in 1914, was in at the start, operating ambulance companies with the British forces before the United States declared war, has won the special regard of the Indian Army.

"American field Service Units were with Indian Divisions in the Middle East in 1941 and later in Tunisia, Italy and Burma. They were always to be found well forward, as their casualties prove, and they earned a high reputation.

"We are happy to be able to absorb a number of their men into the Indian Army as officers, and they proved their worth as combatants as they had already done as non-combatants.

"I wish that American Field Service could have been on parade, but I can assure those who have already gone home that the Indian Army does not forget them."

* * *

A. E. Jones
68 Kenmore Gardens
Bishopbriggs
Larkashire
Scotland

August 1, 1945.

Dear Mr. Galatti;

I have tried for quite a long time now to write this letter, it was something that happened last Tuesday that made me make my mind up. I met two old friends, Field Service men, in Glascow.

It is very unlikely that you will remember me, I met you only once during your visit to Italy, when you inspected the Workshops, but I have been with the American Field Service from May, 1942, till I came home in April, so perhaps as one of the oldest British members I can make the following offer. It is the only way I have, Mr. Galatti, of trying to thank all the Field Service men whom I met for the grand time I had and for a million memories of happy days, but most of all for all they did and are doing for other British Tommies.

Mr. Galatti, if at any time any Field Service man should be in Scotland I want him to get in touch with me. I will try very hard during his stay in my country to help him enjoy himself and may be able to show him many places of interest.

I was sorry I met Charlie Lefferts and Gordon Crawford just a wee bit too late, they were just on their way to London. They are both old Service men and both were very good friends of mine when I was abroad. It was grand seeing them. I just felt like taking both of them through the busiest part of Glascow and shouting to everyone, "Here are two of the Field Service who have done so much to help we British Tommies."

So, Mr. Galatti, if ever you know of any man coming to Scotland please give him my address. I will be really proud to do anything I can for him --- or them.

In closing, Mr. Galatti, I send best wishes to all in the Field Service wherever they may be, but especially to all, who served in Africa and Italy with 485.

Yours very sincerely,

(signed)
A.E. Jones
or as I will be better known as to the Field
Service, "Jock".

P.S. Maybe Major Perry and Major Ray Mitchell will be interested to know I never got that American Field Service Ribbon.

* * *

===============================================

The editor is grateful to Mrs. Ford King (mother of HQ's Rosette King) for her painstaking work on the AFS route map which we proudly include here. Thanks are also due "Bill" Wallace and "Dunny" Hinrichs, both AFS veterans of Wars I and II, for the planning and execution of our operations chart, and to Frederick T. Chapman, well known commercial artist and member of AFS Unit 88, for the cover this, the last issue of "AFS LETTERS".

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